A young senator finds himself opposed to the methods of the boss and his particular henchmen in the matter of a certain bill which is being put through in the interest of a group of ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Frank Kenwick - the Insurgent Senator
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John Keenan - the Political Boss
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The Political Boss's Daughter
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E.C. Brady - the Financier
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Storyline

A young senator finds himself opposed to the methods of the boss and his particular henchmen in the matter of a certain bill which is being put through in the interest of a group of financiers. The boss tries the social bait, inviting him to his own home, introducing him to his daughter, wife and friends. He falls in love with the daughter, but even with this subtle influence, they are unable to win him to their way of thinking. As a last resort they draft a suppositious letter charging the girl's father with treachery and graft in case the bill fails to pass. The boss takes care to leave this letter where his daughter will find it, and feeling that her father's honor is at stake, she at once goes to the young senator's office to plead with him not to make his speech against the bill. She uses her womanly arts to such effect that he several times waivers in his determination, but his honor is stronger even than his love. She finally seizes his manuscript and tears it up before him. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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16 April 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A timely topic and catching the popular spirit of to-day
4 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The Edison Company more frequently than some of its rivals gets away from the beaten path and gives the exhibitor something new and striking. It must also be said that the Edison Company has frequently shown itself thoroughly alive to the problems of modern society and has dealt with them in progressive and vigorous fashion. The strongest political picture play at this writing is undoubtedly "The Insurgent Senator." The plot, while slightly reminiscent of political plays on the stage and of magazine stories, is a strong one, and the settings and the acting often reach absolute perfection. The part of the insurgent senator was played with a happy combination of cleverness and reserve, while the small but difficult role of the boss's daughter was rendered with consummate skill. The groupings of the senate while in session and the workings of the legislative lobby are portrayed with faultless fidelity to life and give the picture a very desirable atmosphere of realism. The director as well as the players seem to have taken unusual pains with this picture and the results of their co-operation is most gratifying. "The Insurgent Senator" is not only a novel and splendid theme for the moving picture with a powerful lesson, but it has the additional advantage of being a timely topic and catching the popular spirit of to-day, which is everywhere working for a renewal of old-fashioned honesty in politics. It may well be featured and will get money and prestige. - The Moving Picture World, May 4, 1912


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