A stern father rules his little family by what he thinks to be the Bible's precepts, but it is simply the influence of his own narrow mind, he forgetting entirely his own youth. Hence when ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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The Young Woman
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The Young Woman's Father
Kate Bruce ...
The Young Woman's Mother
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The Young Woman's Brother
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The Blacksmith
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
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At Barn Dance
Christy Cabanne ...
The Blacksmith's Assistant / At Barn Dance (as W. Christy Cabanne)
William A. Carroll ...
At Barn Dance
Frank Evans ...
Outside Dance
Charles Gorman ...
A Mover
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At Barn Dance
Frank Opperman ...
At Barn Dance
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Outside Dance
W.C. Robinson ...
At Barn Dance
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Storyline

A stern father rules his little family by what he thinks to be the Bible's precepts, but it is simply the influence of his own narrow mind, he forgetting entirely his own youth. Hence when his boy suggests going to a barn dance, he flies into a rage and commands that the boy remain at home. The boy, however, becomes rebellious and goes, and for this act of disobedience the father drives him from the house and forces the rest of the family to swear never to mention his name again. A short time later they move to a new neighborhood, and the boy's sister meets and marries the village blacksmith. The old father has often regretted his harshness to the boy, but his stubborn nature prevents his admitting it. The sister, though, realizes his feelings and writes to her brother, who begs to come home. This almost causes trouble of another nature, for the blacksmith, who knew nothing of the brother, saw his wife in the apparent stranger's arms, and suspicious, was about to leave without asking ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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domestic | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

6 June 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

There are some tense moments in the telling of this gripping story
27 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Into this simple pastoral Biograph has put its best. It is a plain tale of plain people. The adornment is in the acting, chiefly of father and daughter, although mother and son do the full share that the lines lay upon them. The father is of the stern, Puritanical type; whiskers, no mustache, long coat; his Bible is always by him. Every small community has at least one of him, and every small community will immediately recognize the very man in the mind of the writer of the scenario. The father forbids the son and daughter going to the barn dance. The son disobeys. Castigated, verbally and physically, beyond endurance, the son puts in a couple of stiff ones to the paternal jaw. It is hard to repress "Hit him again!" The son is thrown out. The sister gathers her savings and lets herself out of her window to get the small sum to her brother. It is a pretty illustration of a sister's devotion. The father warns the family the son's name is not again to be spoken. The portrayal of the cowed and shrinking mother and daughter is notable. Well, the son gone, the family moves to new fields. The blacksmith comes to board with them. He falls in love with Mary; she, strangely enough, also with him. The son writes home; the father refuses to listen to the letter. Mary and the blacksmith are married, and the latter goes to town. The son comes home. The husband, returning earlier than expected, sees Mary and her brother embracing. Mary and her mother take the son into the room where the father sits asleep. When he awakes he orders out the son. Mary calls his attention to the fact that in his hand there is the collar and tie he tore from the neck of his boy when he threw him out. The father takes his son in his arms. About this time the blacksmith, unable longer to stand the pressure, breaks into the room. Abashed, he drags Mary into the next room to put on her shoulders the new coat he had brought her; he failed, however, to recover in time the note he had left in the coat telling of his intended departure. There are some tense moments in the telling of this gripping story. - The Moving Picture World, June 22, 1912


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