Wandering in his childish gambols from the unwatchful eyes of his governess, a little boy mysteriously disappears. Then follows the anguish of parental devotion, Time goes on, lonesome days... See full summary »

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(as Charles J. Brabin)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
The Father
...
The Mother
Barry O'Moore ...
Jack - the Son - as an Adult
...
The Cashier / Jack's Wife
Louise Sydmeth ...
The Governess
Martin Fuller ...
Jack - the Son - as a Boy (as Marty Fuller)
William Porter Jr. ...
Jack's Son
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Storyline

Wandering in his childish gambols from the unwatchful eyes of his governess, a little boy mysteriously disappears. Then follows the anguish of parental devotion, Time goes on, lonesome days and weary nights come and go, the mother's anxious outstretched arms day by day fall closer to her side. Whispering hope into her husband's ear she expires. There is a row in a gypsy camp. A scrawny youth still in his twenties is defending a wretched hag from the brutalities of her husband. For his white act he is turned from the camp, the only home he knows, where he wandered some years before. The hand of fate again marks his course and eventually he becomes the father of a happy home. Happiness and small prosperity are but momentary, for in the wayward flight of time reverses befall him and the merciless fangs of starvation have already begun to gnaw. In desperation, he enters the home of a wealthy gentleman, seated by the fireside. Hearing a strange noise, he turns and, crouching on the floor ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

7 December 1912 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

We are sure it was over the heads of some in the audience
9 April 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A picture that manages to make clear the subtle methods of mental activity, and most dramatically. The first few scenes lacked plausibility; they were conventional and poor. They show how a mother and father lost their only son. The mother dies, but asks to have the boy's room kept just as it was. When the actual story opens the boy, not knowing who he is, has grown up, is married, has a son of his own, and is out of work and in despair. He burglarizes his father's house and is caught. From this point the action leads to a mutual recognition. It is not done suddenly or crudely, but step by step, through mental association, faint impressions at first grow naturally, and by what they are fed on into convincing memories. In making the development from misty ideas to palpable fact real to the audience, the producer deserves high commendation. We don't think it could be made clear to the gallery; we are sure it was over the heads of some in the audience, but to the imaginative it was like food and drink. George Lessey, as the father, and Barry O'Moore, as the son, bear the burden of the work, but Bessie Learn helps a good deal. Gertrude McCoy plays the mother; Louise Sydmth, a governess; Marty Fuller and William Porter play the two boys. - The Moving Picture World, December 21, 1912


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