MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 44,620 this week

The Girl and Her Trust (1912)

 -  Short | Drama  -  28 March 1912 (USA)
6.9
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.9/10 from 755 users  
Reviews: 11 user | 1 critic

Some tramps assault the telegraph office trying to rob $2000 delivered by train. The telegraphist girl, trying to help, telegraphs the next station and then the men are captured.

Director:

Writer:

0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 27 titles
created 08 Mar 2012
 
list image
a list of 121 titles
created 23 Mar 2012
 
a list of 97 titles
created 17 Jul 2012
 
a list of 744 titles
created 19 Sep 2012
 
a list of 3859 titles
created 16 Mar 2013
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: The Girl and Her Trust (1912)

The Girl and Her Trust (1912) on IMDb 6.9/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of The Girl and Her Trust.

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Dorothy Bernard ...
Grace, the Telegraph Operator
Wilfred Lucas ...
Jack, Railroad Express Agent
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Edwin August ...
Younger Tramp
Christy Cabanne ...
Baggage Handler (as W. Christy Cabanne)
William A. Carroll ...
Engineer
Charles Gorman ...
Older Tramp, Next to Train
...
Telegrapher's Companion / Remote Station Worker
Walter Long ...
Grace's Bashful Suitor
Charles Hill Mailes ...
Remote Telegraph Operator
Anthony O'Sullivan ...
(unconfirmed)
Alfred Paget ...
Tramp
W.C. Robinson ...
Simple Suitor
Charles West ...
Telegrapher
Edit

Storyline

Some tramps assault the telegraph office trying to rob $2000 delivered by train. The telegraphist girl, trying to help, telegraphs the next station and then the men are captured. Written by Michel Rudoy <mdrc@hp9000a1.uam.mx>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 March 1912 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Girl and Her Trust  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Goofs

When the 2 tramps are taking the express trunk for the station, it is dark outside when they open the door. Looking through the window next to the door, it is light outside. It's also light outside when tramps get outside of the station. The same happens when the telegraph operator leaves the station. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hollywood: Pioneers (1980) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
D.W. Griffith revolutionizes the filmmaking industry (an industry for filmmaking did, in fact, exist by this time) with a simple but groundbreaking film about a girl trying to protect herself and her money.
6 September 2000 | by (Luoyang, China) – See all my reviews

The Girl and Her Trust, like all films made in the early 1900s, is very simple and very short, but Griffith introduces a number of filmmaking techniques that remain widely in use to this day. Earlier films generally played like a stage play, with minimal cutting or editing, and each scene taking place in the same location and generally in the same shot. The Girl and Her Trust was one of the first films to suggest that editing could create artificial environments by linking sets together, and it also gave a better idea of what exactly was going on (the close-up of the girl as she places the bullet in the keyhole is a great example).

Besides that, this film also had a very well-made chase at the end, in which the good guys are in a locomotive chasing the bad guys (the guys who stole the $2000 from the girl - her 'trust') who are pumping furiously on a railroad handcart. Although technically crude by today's standards, this scene had every necessary element of a good chase sequence, and it works very well. The film also introduced the idea of cross-cutting in filmmaking, as well as the idea of filming outdoors (a technique barely and clumsily employed by Edwin Porter in The Great Train Robbery). The Girl and Her Trust is a historic film, but as with all films that were made in the early 1900s, you need to keep its age in mind. It's not going to blow you away with visuals or sound, but if you keep in mind the time period in which it was made, you can begin to really appreciate its innovation.


6 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Girl and Her Trust (1912) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?