John Adams is a pioneer, living in a log cabin with his wife and baby girl. He digs a bear pit. A big black bear falls crashing into it. An Indian comes upon the captured animal and shoots ... See full summary »

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Dot Adams - a Frontier Child
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The Chief's Son
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John Adams is a pioneer, living in a log cabin with his wife and baby girl. He digs a bear pit. A big black bear falls crashing into it. An Indian comes upon the captured animal and shoots it and secures the skin. Adams meets him with the bearskin on his arm and attempts to take the hide away. The Indian draws a knife, and a fierce encounter takes place, in which Adams lands a crushing blow on the Indian's jaw. knocking him down. As Adams walks away the Indian regains his feet, and fires at the trapper. As the report rings out and the bullet sings past his head, Adams drops to the ground and feigns death. The Indian runs up and leans over him and is clutched by the throat by Adams, who leaps to his feet. The Indian is badly wounded and Adams departs. The redskin happens to be the chief's son, and when he is found by his tribe their rage is unbounded. A war dance is held, and they decide to retaliate by an attack upon the whites. Mrs. Brown, a neighbor, is taken ill and her husband ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short | Western

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Release Date:

13 September 1912 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Settler's Child  »

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1.33 : 1
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A bona fide big feature picture
4 February 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A very desirable, two-reel Indian picture with the interest largely centered in a winsome little girl, daughter of a trapper. The child happens to be left alone in the 1og cabin by her mother who goes to visit a sick friend across the hills The father, looking after his crops, has had an altercation with an Indian and before he can get home, the whole tribe is out on the warpath. The picture is desirable, because the action is thrilling throughout both reels. It is not a one-reel picture padded into 2,000 feet of film; but a bona fide big feature picture. It is breathlessly dramatic and. though not a single situation picture, the center is kept fairly close to the little log cabin all the time. The photography is of a quality that could hardly be improved and renders the commotion and dread, scattered over a big country, it seems, by the horde of reds that descends upon it very stirringly. At the end, we should have been shown the Indians, not only beaten at the fort, but driven out of the valley, because the cabin seems still unprotected after all that nightmare. The picture is so big and thrilling that that is the only criticism we care to make on it. It is a sure winner. - The Moving Picture World, September 21, 1912


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