Old Von Shultz, the first violin, finds as he grows older a longing for companionship. Hurrying from the theater the old musician finds little Helen sleeping on the steps of the stage door.... See full summary »

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Cast

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Von Schultz - an Old Musician
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Helen's Step-Mother
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Helen's Step-Father
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Helen - a Little Waif
Hazel Neason
Charles Eldridge
James Morrison
Mr. Villa
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Storyline

Old Von Shultz, the first violin, finds as he grows older a longing for companionship. Hurrying from the theater the old musician finds little Helen sleeping on the steps of the stage door. He picks her up and takes her to his comfortably furnished home. The old man even grows childish, he is so pleased with the little tot's presence and he gives her the love with which his heart abounds. The next day he learns from the morning papers that Helen's mother and father were lost in a fire. He spends many happy hours with her, playing with her toys. He takes her to rehearsals with him, where she is the pet of the musicians. One year later Helen shows an aptness for the stage. This delights the old musician and the child grows nearer and dearer to his heart. A sad blow, however, comes to him when the Children's Society take the little girl away from him and once more he finds himself a lonely old man. Helen is taken from the Children's Society by a family who make her life one of drudgery. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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2 February 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It is Van Dyke Brooke at his best
23 July 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is a "one man" picture in which the leading character is portrayed in a very able manner by Mr. Van Dyke Brooke. It is good to look at, although it is a trifle sad in its general idea. But that is easily compensated for by Mr. Brooke's rare technique, which is displayed in this picture to the limit. The story is along the lines of the Music Master: that of an old theater musician who found a waif and cared for it until the Children's Society agents came to claim it. The old man and his companions had become attached to the child and the portrayal of the grief of the old musician in parting with the child constitutes the theme, which is carried out in a masterful manner. The story does not descend into any mawkishness. Suffice it to say that it is Van Dyke Brooke at his best. A picture of tender pathos that is well worth while. - The Moving Picture World, January 20, 1912


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