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Children Who Labor (1912)

Not Rated | | Drama, Short | 23 February 1912 (USA)

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A foreigner who does not understand the ways of this country, applies for work at a mill, but is sent away with the intimation that if has a child at home there will be work for it, but ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)

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Cast

Cast overview:
...
William Hanscomb - the Mill Owner
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Louise Hanscomb
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Mabel Hanscomb (as Leonie Flugrath)
John Sturgeon ...
The Immigrant Father
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The Immigrant Mother
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The Immigrant's Older Daughter
Edna May Weick ...
The Immigrant's Young Daughter
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An Owner of a Mill
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A Friend of Mr. Hanscomb
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An Unskilled Laborer
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The Warden of the Prison
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Storyline

A foreigner who does not understand the ways of this country, applies for work at a mill, but is sent away with the intimation that if has a child at home there will be work for it, but none for himself. We then travel in vision to New York to the home of a wealthy mill owner, to whom an appeal is being made to use his influence against child labor. He indicates that he can do nothing about it, and resents the insinuation that his own child might be one of the unfortunate except for her birth and his protection. His wife shows her interest in the project. We turn to the mill again and find that the foreigner, pushed by his poverty and unable get work himself, finally yields and puts his daughter to work, as the family must have bread. The next thing we see is that Hanscomb, the rich mill owner, has sent his wife and child on a journey, and the little one, getting off the train in a spirit of mischief, is left behind in a small town, which happens to be the same one in which the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

23 February 1912 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(2004 National Film Preservation Foundation print)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

One of the 50 films in the 3-disk boxed DVD set called "More Treasures from American Film Archives, 1894-1931" (2004), compiled by the National Film Preservation Foundation from 5 American film archives. This film has a running time of 13 minutes, an added piano music score, and is preserved by the Museum of Modern Art. See more »

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User Reviews

Every appeal that it makes to the heart it is absolutely probable
30 September 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

There is nothing that so strongly works to make good art as to have one's heart wrapped up in one's subject matter; it is more valuable than experience, training ambition or any other kind of strength. This picture was written by Ethel Browning. Many of its scenes, as produced and acted are very artistic but sincerity glows in every one of its scenes. This reviewer has heard audiences receive good pictures before, but he has never heard the applause that this picture got, given to any other. It was partly because of its subject; the people feel it deeply, but no poor picture would have been received so. The story, artistically manipulated to be effecting, so convincingly moves us that no one stops to think that it is improbable. The picture's life comes from the fact that in every appeal that it makes to the heart it is absolutely probable. Everything that is really significant in it rings true to human life. It is well acted, well photographed. To the exhibitor we will say, it is the popular picture. To the minister we will say here is the chance to give your congregation and Sunday school a sermon that is worthwhile. To the principals of schools we will say, here is education in contemporary conditions for your pupils. To the public we will say, if you see this picture, you'll be enthusiastic for child labor reform and also for moving pictures because they can show you these things. What an optimistic outlook such a picture gives. - The Moving Picture World, March 9, 1912


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