At the Hunting Lodge there arrives a great braggadocio who boasts that he, while in Africa, only went in quest of big game, showing a lot of skins as trophies of his expeditions. Out he ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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The Brave Hunter
Dell Henderson ...
The Brave Hunter's Rival
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The Woman
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(unconfirmed)
Kate Bruce ...
In Lodge
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In Lodge
William J. Butler ...
In Lodge
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In Lodge
J. Jiquel Lanoe ...
In Lodge
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Storyline

At the Hunting Lodge there arrives a great braggadocio who boasts that he, while in Africa, only went in quest of big game, showing a lot of skins as trophies of his expeditions. Out he starts, accoutered in the most approved fashion, to add to his already extensive collection by bringing back some more embryonic floor rugs, and he came near getting them, or rather, they came near getting him. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short

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22 April 1912 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Released as a split reel along with the comedy Won by a Fish (1912). See more »

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User Reviews

 
One of the Funnier and Cuter Biograph Comedies
24 November 2012 | by (Orlando, United States) – See all my reviews

The Sennett-Normand Biograph comedies from 1911-1912 don't have the zany-crazy nature of the 1912-1913 Keystone comedies. However, they generally have a quieter charm of their own.

Here it is nice to see Sennett playing a different character than his usual hillbilly lover. Sennett looks quite dashing as the big game hunter. He's quite comically cowardly when the real big game shows up. Mabel is so calm and natural with the bear that she appears like a goddess or other worldly creature. She acts as if she's doing the scene with a cat or dog.The only thing to match it is Harold Lloyd's work with a lion in his "Sin of Harold Diddlebach" (1947).

If you want to see a good representative biograph comedy from 1912, this is an excellent example.


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