Alcibiades Shamley and Cassandra, a sweet young girl, with a very bad temper, are married. After the wedding Cassandra prepares her pup, Cara, for the wedding .journey. The Pullman car ... See full summary »

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Alcibiades Shamley
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Cassandra
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Alcibiades Shamley and Cassandra, a sweet young girl, with a very bad temper, are married. After the wedding Cassandra prepares her pup, Cara, for the wedding .journey. The Pullman car porter discovers the dog in the car and Alcy and his bride are promptly put off. She wires her uncle, the vice-president of the road, asking that all the employees of the railway be discharged as Cara has been insulted. Reaching their first stopping place, Alcy is informed that no dogs are allowed. Cassandra insists she will keep the dog and they start out for another hotel. Alcy finally bribes the clerk of a railroad hotel to permit them to keep the pup. They are hardly safely landed, however, before the pup causes trouble. To cap the climax he makes a meal of the maid's new hat. In the meantime, Alcy has been receiving a series of telegrams from his wife's relatives, all in the same vein. The last one is a dandy: "Take my tip. A six-barred fence isn't in it with Cassandra's temper. Some of her own ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short | Drama | Romance

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6 September 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The appearance of Mr. Drew in pictures marks a further step in the progress of the photoplay
4 April 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

When an actor of the standing of Sidney Drew lends his distinguished talents to the photoplay the event is notable, and then, when the vehicle in which he makes his appearance is no less than one of his own successful sketches which has delighted audiences on two continents, "When Two Hearts Are Won," our respectful attention is at once commanded. This sketch might, with no great stretch of imagination, be termed a modern version of "Taming of the Shrew." Alcibiades Shamley marries Cassandra, a beautiful young girl with a temper and a determination to have her own way with things in general, also she is devoted to a pet dog of diminutive proportions, called Cara. After the wedding the pup is prepared for the bridal tour with great ceremony, but the rules of the Pullman Car Company forbid dogs being carried on their coaches, so the Shamleys are put off the train. At the hotel accommodations are refused because of a rule against dogs, but the Shamleys manage to find a resting place in the Railroad Hotel by bribing the clerk to admit the dog. Here the pup makes trouble by chewing up the maid's hat. During these events Alcy has been getting telegrams from his wife's folks warning him against her violent temper, the last one being from her Uncle David which advises Alcy to give her some of her own medicine. Previous events convince Alcy that it is now time to assert himself, so he takes Uncle David's advice and starts in to mix things up on the pretense that the pup has swallowed his collar button. By the time he has wrecked the place Cassandra is completely subdued and asks Alcy's forgiveness. The appearance of Mr. Drew in pictures marks a further step in advance in the progress of the photoplay. Though serving his apprenticeship on the legitimate stage, he early elected to cast his lot with vaudeville, in which field he has gained a reputation and a position equal to that held by his distinguished brother John Drew, the dramatic star. To many patrons of the pictures his features will be familiar. His performance before the camera could not have been more satisfactory had he served a long apprenticeship in the picture studio. Good photography and snappy action throughout make this picture one of the most interesting of next week's licensed releases and a feather in the cap of the Kalem Company.

  • The Moving Picture World, September 2, 1911


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