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The Subduing of Mrs. Nag (1911)

Mrs. Nag objects to her husband having a pretty female stenographer in his office, and orders him to employ one of his own sex. So Miss Prue, the good-looking stenographer to whom Mrs. Nag ... See full summary »

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Mr. Nag
Flora Finch ...
Mrs. Nag
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Miss Prue, the Stenographer
Mrs. B.F. Clinton
James Morrison
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Storyline

Mrs. Nag objects to her husband having a pretty female stenographer in his office, and orders him to employ one of his own sex. So Miss Prue, the good-looking stenographer to whom Mrs. Nag objects, dresses in man's attire. On her way to business one morning she sends a bouquet of flowers to Mrs. Nag, with the inscription, "Compliments of an ardent admirer." Miss Prue apprises her boss of her deed, and when Mrs. Nag arrives at his office, he accuses her of having another admirer. Miss Prue is victorious and when we see her in the last scene she is her own admirable self once more, seated before the typewriter in Mr. Nag's office, with every prospect of being an uninterrupted and permanent employee. Mild and docile, Mrs. Nag modestly enters the office, but offers no objections or interruptions, submissively waiting for her husband to escort her home. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Comedy | Short

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14 July 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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These character plays of the Vitagraph Company are all good
15 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This comic character picture gives the two leading character players, "Bunny" and Miss Finch, of the Vitagraph Company, a splendid chance to show how much can be pictured, almost told, by facial expression, and the amount of characterization that they accomplish is remarkable. But between Little Miss Prue, the stenographer to whom Mrs. Nag objects and the prim Miss Prus, of next day, the supposedly new stenographer, there is such an amusing difference that it alone is worthwhile seeing. These character plays of the Vitagraph Company are all good. This is better than the average, but they are not to be compared with the real comedies that this company produces every now and then. - The Moving Picture World, July 29, 1911


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