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Picciola; or, The Prison Flower (1911)

The incidents of this beautifully pathetic and romantic picture occurred at the time of Napoleon Bonaparte. Comte de Charney is sentenced to life imprisonment for political conspiracy. In ... See full summary »
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Cast

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Theresa Girhardi
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Comte de Charney, a Prisoner
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Storyline

The incidents of this beautifully pathetic and romantic picture occurred at the time of Napoleon Bonaparte. Comte de Charney is sentenced to life imprisonment for political conspiracy. In the same prison, Girhardi, an Italian, is confined. He has a beautiful daughter named Theresa, who visits her father and sees de Charney exercising in the prison yard. She is sympathetic and looks upon the Count as an interesting and attractive person. Her eyes follow him as he bends over the pavements of the yard to examine two tiny green leaves which are springing up in the crack between the pavements and hears him exclaim, "Picciola," or "little flower." The plant seems to take a deep hold upon the Count and day after day, during his recreation periods, its growth furnishes him with new thoughts and occupation as he carefully guards and cultivates it in its development, and when his time for exercising is up he leaves it with hesitancy and regret. Theresa, in her visits to her father, from time to... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

29 April 1911 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Flor do Prisioneiro  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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The sentiment expressed is unusually tender
18 January 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

In this story a little plant springs up between the stones in a prison yard. It is tenderly cared for by de Charney, a nobleman who is a political prisoner. When he fell ill a tea made from its leaves cured him. A petition to Napoleon regarding the plant brought the emperor, in person, directing that the plant be spared, and ultimately securing for this prisoner and one other a pardon. A tender love story is interwoven, supplying heart interest and ending in the girl, a daughter of one of the prisoners, marrying de Charney. The details are worked out with care, and the sentiment expressed is unusually tender. The story grips from beginning to end. - The Moving Picture World, May 13, 1911


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