We see the British Colonel receive his orders to march on to Concord and destroy the stores gathered there by the Continentals. On his staff is a young captain, whose reluctance to take ... See full summary »

Director:

(as Oscar C. Apfel)
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Cast

Cast overview:
...
The Minute Man
...
His Wife
...
His Father
Edwin Clarke ...
His Son
Edna May Weick ...
His Daughter
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A British Officer
James Gordon
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Storyline

We see the British Colonel receive his orders to march on to Concord and destroy the stores gathered there by the Continentals. On his staff is a young captain, whose reluctance to take arms against the "rebels" brings upon himself the ridicule of his comrades. The morning of April nineteenth dawns and we see the Minute Man and his family, consisting of his father, wife and two children, at breakfast. The Minute Man and his son leave for their work in the field, while the others attend to their various household duties. While engaged in plowing, a horseman dashes up and informs them that the British regulars are on their way to Concord. Father and son mount their plow horses and hurry to the house, where they tell the news. Hastily donning their uniforms, they are about to leave, when grandfather insists upon joining them, and, seizing his old battered drum, departs for the front. At Lexington, where the Minute Men are gathering on the village green, to check the British advance, they... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Plot Keywords:

patriotism | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

14 July 1911 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The picture awakens deep emotions and is effective
15 March 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is the second film picturing the British march from Boston to Lexington and of the two this is easily the better. One wishes he could commend it wholly. It if had been only a bit more realistic, it would have been wonderful. Some of it is wonderful, but not the repulse at the bridge. There was no cause for panic as shown. Those troops needed more than that to frighten them. The British soldiers should have been met with a much larger and wider volume of smoke and the panic should, perhaps, have overcome them, as a whole, more suddenly. This was the place to pile up the corpses rather than along the road. At the rate they fell there, there wouldn't have been any left. The picture awakens deep emotions and is effective. - The Moving Picture World, July 29, 1911


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