A pretty mountain girl has to decide between three suitors, an upright young man from the mountains, a shiftless fiddler, and a visitor from the city.

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Credited cast:
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Charles West ...
Joseph Graybill ...
Kate Toncray ...
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James Kirkwood ...
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J. Jiquel Lanoe ...
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Storyline

The old soldier's little daughter has two persistent suitors. One, a manly fellow, who tells the girl she will marry him in spite of all. Her other suitor is a good-natured, shiftless chap, whose weaknesses are booze and music, he being the village fiddler. He tries to get the lead on his neighbor by presenting her with a mammoth pumpkin. He thinks this little attention should win her, but she has met and become interested in a young stranger from the big city, who is hunting and fishing in these hills. The fiddler, despairing, plays soulfully on his violin, thinking the strains may soften her heart. They do, but for the other fellow, with whom she consents to elope. Her manly friend prevents this, however, by driving the city fellow away. The girl realizes the error of her intentions and accepts her mountain knight, just as the fiddler arrives to renew his suit, aided by the pumpkin. He might have exclaimed, "Well, I'll be darned," but he simply ejaculates, "Oh! Pumpkins!" Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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30 October 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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More suitable for the story teller than the picture maker
12 May 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The characters in this picture are the same in type as those in a recent release of the Biograph Company, "The Revenue Man and the Girl." The backgrounds and scenes also are similar. The players who act the picture are different. On the whole, it is not so successful, being, by its very nature, more suitable for the story teller than the picture maker. This is most noticeable where one of the picture's characters plays on the violin and the effect of his music is shown in the heroine's charge of attitude toward a city man who is visiting the hills. She didn't love him, but under the music's spell, she thought she did. We don't hear any music when the shiftless genius of the hills scrapes on his old fiddle. We suspect that it's pretty dismal sound, but in the next scene we see the girl listening and then we see her fall into the arms of the city man. It doesn't seem very effecting. The two plan to run away together and this speedily brings the story to its climax, the discrediting of the city fop and the girl's recognition of the worthy qualities is a sturdy young mountaineer, whom, without knowing it, she had really loved from the first even while she had repulsed and made fun of him. This, the player's work had shown rather skillfully. The manly mountaineer's part is also very well done as is, in fact, each of the parts. The picture has a good deal of humor, for the fiddler too loved the girl and he thought to win her with pumpkins. That is a very commendable addition, quite true of rural life. The picture will stand, because of the good things that are in it. - The Moving Picture World, November 4, 1911


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