The first scene introduces us into a drawing room in England where amateur theatricals are taking place and we see one of the big financiers, the Hon. Grant Richmond, of the country in the ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Sir Andrew
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Honorable Grant Richmond
Camille Dalberg ...
The Hostess
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Amateur Actress
Bigelow Cooper ...
Amateur Actor
Ethel Jewett ...
Amateur Actress
Joseph Levering ...
Amateur Actor
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The Butler
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Storyline

The first scene introduces us into a drawing room in England where amateur theatricals are taking place and we see one of the big financiers, the Hon. Grant Richmond, of the country in the audience. The next day at his club, word is brought to him that the Navy Bill is about to come up before the House and that if Sir Andrew, the influential member, speaks in its favor it will pass. The question is what the financial man and his friends can do to prevent the bill coming to a vole or passing. As Sir Andrew proves not to be amenable to argument, the case looks hopeless, but the financial man suddenly bethinks him of the amateur players and he evolves a brilliant plan. Sir Andrew having left the club, Mr. Richmond dashes out, jumps into his automobile and passing the member on his way to Parliament, rushes on until he comes to the house wherein be saw the amateur performance. Knowing that the member must pass this house on his way, he begs them to play the drama as though it were some ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Comedy | Drama

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22 December 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The plot is sufficiently strong to hold the interest
12 June 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An excellent picture purporting to represent an English political intrigue. A certain member of Parliament, whose voice and vote would have passed an objectionable measure, is prevented from reaching the house in time by the opposition's inducing a girl to call for assistance just as he passed her house. She merely re-enacted a scene from amateur theatricals that she had played. This was sufficient to hold him until too late to take part in the debate or vote upon the question. Presumably the bill did not pass. The acting is extremely good and the plot is sufficiently strong to hold the interest of the audience throughout. - The Moving Picture World, January 6, 1912


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