Count Alphonse Louis Francis Castelene makes his appearance in the little town of Rawhide, via the stagecoach, and presents the proprietor of the tavern with a letter of introduction from ... See full summary »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Victor Potel ...
The Count
Augustus Carney ...
Stump Carney
Arthur Mackley
Fred Church
John B. O'Brien
Harry Todd
Joseph Smith
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Storyline

Count Alphonse Louis Francis Castelene makes his appearance in the little town of Rawhide, via the stagecoach, and presents the proprietor of the tavern with a letter of introduction from this latter's friend in the east. The note reads: "Friend Mackley, This will introduce you to Count Castelene, who comes to your town to look over mining properties. Show him what favors you can. Your friend, Jack Dupont." The Count looks the part. He is tall and lanky, clothed immaculately in the latest Parisian mode and style, and proved immediately a source of great wonder to the gaping cowboys who help him and his baggage from the coach. The Count presents his letter to the tavern keeper, who sees great possibilities for the name and fame of his tavern in harboring a real nobleman. Consequently the Count is given the freedom of the city and told to make himself at home. It is not long after the Count has fairly established himself at the tavern, surrounded by cowpunchers, that some altercations ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Western | Comedy

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Release Date:

7 January 1911 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The story is told with a clarity that leaves nothing to be desired
26 October 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A comedy which possesses all the crisp and attractive qualities that are usually present in comedies from this house. The scene is laid in the West and presents a French count, in immaculate attire, suddenly dropped among the cowboys. Following an altercation he offers to fight a duel, but when the results of a scheme arranged by the cowboys to show his opponent killing duelists by wholesale are seen, he breaks away and barely succeeds in catching the stage on his way back to the effete East, while the cowboys make merry over their successful joke. The character studies are excellent. The story is told with a clarity that leaves nothing to be desired, while the audience does not fail to make its deep interest in the play manifest. - The Moving Picture World, January 21, 1911


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