Hank Denby, a miner, has a loving little wife, but he is a brute and abuses her. She bears it patiently until one day when forbearance ceases to be a virtue. He goes out to his work after ... See full summary »

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Hank Denby - the Miner
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Mrs. Denby - the Miner's Wife
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Hank Denby, a miner, has a loving little wife, but he is a brute and abuses her. She bears it patiently until one day when forbearance ceases to be a virtue. He goes out to his work after an unusually violent scene, in which his wife is in tears as a consequence. She is all alone on the mountain, but resolves to desert her husband, to go, anywhere to rid herself of the obnoxious presence of the husband. She packs a few of her belongings, writes a note to Denby, and is about to go out into the world when Philip Baldwin, a prospector much older than she, comes into the cabin in search of food and drink. He is welcomed by the woman as he is kind. He looks about the cabin and notes her preparation for flight in surprise. On being questioned, the girl wife tells him of the ill treatment she has been subjected to and her decision to leave it all. He mildly tries to dissuade her, to no avail. She is determined to leave and asks to be allowed to travel in his company. The big rough fellow ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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19 October 1911 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The film is presumed lost. See more »

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User Reviews

We recommend "The Aggressor" for a critical examination
17 April 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

To those who may have any lingering doubts regarding the high quality of photoplays now coming from the hands of the I.M.P. Co., we recommend "The Aggressor" for a critical examination. It is seldom that anything quite so dramatic is issued by any maker of pictures, and certainly none has offered a better example in motion picture photography or in serious portrayal of basic human emotions. The story is laid in the western mining country where men think and act primitively. A young miner abuses his pretty wife who deserts him for the first man who comes along, another miner. When the husband returns, the knowledge that his wife has left him does not seem to affect him seriously until he happens upon a cigar butt, which discovery conveys to him a realization that she has gone with another man. His jealousy is aroused and, gun in hand, he seeks the despoiler of his home. In the meantime the man and woman have traveled far and are resting in camp. While going for water the man falls over a precipice and is badly hurt. While the woman moans in despair at the side of the injured paramour, the husband, who has been wildly following their trail, arrives and discovers them. The woman prevents an immediate killing and induces her husband to take the injured miner back to their cabin. The injured man recovers and is about to depart when the husband intimates that there is a score between them to be settled. The interloper is reluctant to engage in any hostilities, but the husband forces the issue, with the result that in a pistol duel the husband forces the issue, with the result that in a pistol duel the husband is killed. A terrified witness to the proceedings which she is unable to prevent, the wife rushes to the body of her fallen husband. Finding him dead, she turns upon the other man and drives him from her presence. The plot gives ample play for intense emotion and the work of the Imp players is gratifying in the extreme, in that they do not overplay their parts, which might easily be done. The photographic effects are appreciably heightened in the final scene where the survivor of the duel is seen slowly wending his way over the brow of the hill in the light of the rising sun. It is a picture that is highly creditable to the Imp Company. - The Moving Picture World, October 7, 1911


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