A picture dramatization from Sir Ed Burne-Jones' famous painting, with suggestions from that world famous poem by Rudyard Kipling, each conceded a peer in the literary and world of art. ... See full summary »

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Guy Temple
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Loie - the Vampire
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A picture dramatization from Sir Ed Burne-Jones' famous painting, with suggestions from that world famous poem by Rudyard Kipling, each conceded a peer in the literary and world of art. This great subject handles deftly the realms of the imaginary inner circle of society. (Even as you and I) A fool there was and he made his prayer, To a rag and a bone and a hank of hair (We called her the woman who did not care) But the fool called her his lady fair (Even as you and I). Guy Temple, as "the fool there was" marries his brother's ward, his boyhood sweetheart, Emily. The young husband becomes ensnared in the toils of the Vampire (a destroyer of souls). Clandestine meetings are arranged and the cunning, unscrupulous, satanic actions of the Vampire compels the poor weakling, Temple, to falter and fall before her charms. John Temple, the other brother, determines to save the young husband when he discovers his perfidy, and to recover the jewels given the Vampire by Guy. In a dream he ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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10 November 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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The producer failed to convey the sentiment of the poem
28 September 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An attempt to put into pictorial form Sir Edwin Burne-Jones' picture and Rudyard Kipling's poem. Perhaps the attempt is successful in that it will be understood by those familiar with the picture and the poem. But what about those who are unfamiliar with them? Several near the writer were heard to ask what it all meant, and the probability is strong that many others are in much the same position. It is artistic, it is beautiful in the literary quality it possesses, but it is scarcely plain enough to be understood by the average person in an audience. In other words, the producer failed to convey the sentiment of the poem, however well it was staged and acted. - The Moving Picture World, November 26, 1910


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