John Bradley is a trusted clerk with an oil company. Enjoying a fair salary, he is comfortably fixed in a modest little village home with his wife and two small children. Starting from home... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Arthur V. Johnson ...
John Bradley
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Florence Barker ...
Mrs. John Barker
Gladys Egan ...
One of the Bradley Children
Francis J. Grandon ...
At Lucky Jim's Place
Dell Henderson ...
A Gambler
W. Chrystie Miller ...
A Priest
George Nichols ...
The Marshal
Frank Opperman ...
On Street
Alfred Paget ...
A Gambler
Lottie Pickford
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Storyline

John Bradley is a trusted clerk with an oil company. Enjoying a fair salary, he is comfortably fixed in a modest little village home with his wife and two small children. Starting from home in the morning he is accompanied by the two little ones, who always looked forward to each morning's scamper in the hills with pleasurable anticipation. He is met at the office door by the manager and handed a large sum of money with instructions to carry it to the bank. This is witnessed by a well-known gambler of the town, who being in hard link, resolves to get that money by hook or crook. Making a short cut across the little town, he manages to intercept John on his way to the bank, and in the course of their conversation invites him to have a drink, as it is half an hour before the bank opens. The invitation is accepted and while in the saloon the gambler tries to inveigle John into a game, but here his will serves him and he resists the fascination. However, he drinks at the serving of the ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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oil | melodrama | See All (2) »

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Drama | Short

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28 July 1910 (USA)  »

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A print of this film survives in the Library of Congress. See more »

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It is unsafe to tamper with one's weakness
2 August 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

How strong an incentive a six-shooter in the hands of a determined individual may be is graphically illustrated in this picture. Probably the effective argument which forces the gambler to disgorge his ill- gotten gains and will be looked upon as the most striking feature in the picture, but there is a strong moral lesson which deserves equal consideration, conveyed in the difficulty in which John finds himself as a result of his indulgence in a little drink. It is unsafe to tamper with one's weakness, even when one feels strong enough to withstand any temptation that may arise. Some will recognize this feature of the picture, while others will see only the spectacular hold-up of the gambler. After taking part in these warlike and effective demonstrations the good priest takes the opportunity to read John a strong, admonitory lecture on the dangers of gambling. Altogether the picture is good and deserves a long run. - The Moving Picture World, August 13, 1910


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