PART I. The incidents of this story are some of those preceding and lending up to the Civil War in 1861 and the Declaration of Emancipation. The central figure in the drama is Uncle Tom, a ... See full synopsis »

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(novel), (scenario) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Credited cast:
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Topsy
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Eliza
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Uncle Tom
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Ophelia St. Clare
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Eva
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Shelby
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Julia Arthur
Matty Roubert ...
Little Harry
Earle Williams
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Storyline

PART I. The incidents of this story are some of those preceding and lending up to the Civil War in 1861 and the Declaration of Emancipation. The central figure in the drama is Uncle Tom, a slave in the possession of the Shelbys of Kentucky. Tom is a peculiarly extraordinary character, possessing all the virtues and none of the bad qualities of his race, a possession brought about by a gradual realization, absorption and practice of Christian principles through a close study of the Bible. To the Shelbys he is an invaluable asset, because of his honesty and trustworthiness. Mr. Shelby, although owner of vast estates, has become greatly involved in debt, as is often the case with aristocracy. His notes have come into the hands of a slave trader named Haley, who presses Shelby for money long overdue. While visiting Shelby on one of his periodic "duns," he agrees to purchase "Uncle Tom" and Harry, a child of a quadroon, Eliza, Mrs. Shelby's maid. It is a hard bargain, but necessity, which ...

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Short | Drama

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Release Date:

31 October 1910 (Denmark)  »

Also Known As:

La cabaña del tío Tom  »

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1.33 : 1
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Connections

Version of Uncle Tom's Cabin (1903) See more »

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Deserves all the applause which it receives
1 August 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

PART 1. The first of a series of three reels, each approximately 1,000 feet, and intended to adequately present this powerful and fascinating drama. This reel depicts the escape of Eliza and the removal of Uncle Tom from his old home in Kentucky. Most of the salient facts in the story up to that point are graphically produced. It is scarcely necessary to go over the story. It is well known to practically every one. The staging is adequate and the actors have caught the spirit of the original story and develop their parts with a skill and intelligence which must be seen to be appreciated. While the story has lost most of its power with the removal of the reason for its existence, it still has a fascination which few are able to resist, and in this film that fascination is retained. It is a picture of power, and deserves all the applause which it receives. The producing firm deserves commendation for the sympathy and excellence of its work. - The Moving Picture World, August 6, 1910. PART 2. The second film illustrating this once popular story. It carries one forward to the death of Eva, showing the affection of Eva for Uncle Tom, the purchase of the old negro by St. Clair, the appearance of Topsy and finally Eva's death. The staging and scenic effects are wonderfully well produced and the story is followed closely enough to make it plain to those have read it. On the other hand, should anyone see it who never read the story the picture tells it plainly enough to make it understood. - The Moving Picture World, August 13, 1910. PART 3. This film, the last in the series, illustrates the re-sale of Uncle Tom to Simon Legree, the escape of Cassie and the cruel punishment and death of Uncle Tom, with the accessories which are described in the novel. What is said of this film may be accepted as applying to the entire series. Probably few novels offer such a fertile field for exploitation in motion pictures as this. The incidents, as described, are dramatic, but they are more. They arouse the emotions more forcibly than almost any other book published, and in playing upon the emotions they excite interest. The acting is sympathetic, with full appreciation of the possibilities of the piece. Perhaps few reproductions of long stories have been so well done. The difficulty generally is that the stories seem disconnected and in a way meaningless; but in this instance the continuity has been preserved, even in the process of elimination which has been unusually severe. But the novel has so many salient features that with only the most prominent shown there is no trouble in holding the interest of the audience. The series will be recognized as an achievement of importance, calculated to excite more than ordinary interest in the minds of almost any audience. - The Moving Picture World, August 13, 1910


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