Edward Rose, as president of the Independent Sugar Company, has proved a formidable antagonist of the giant Sugar Trust. His is the only concern which has withstood its advances, and so it ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
George Nichols ...
Mr. Rose
Grace Henderson ...
Mrs. Rose
Verner Clarges ...
President of the Sugar Company
Gladys Egan ...
Little Alice
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Clara T. Bracy ...
A Maid
William J. Butler ...
A Client
Charles Craig ...
In President's Office
Adele DeGarde ...
(unconfirmed)
Edward Dillon ...
At Work
Francis J. Grandon ...
A Partner
Edith Haldeman ...
Little Ruth
Dell Henderson ...
At Work
Arthur V. Johnson ...
(unconfirmed)
Henry Lehrman ...
At Work
Jeanie Macpherson ...
At Work
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Storyline

Edward Rose, as president of the Independent Sugar Company, has proved a formidable antagonist of the giant Sugar Trust. His is the only concern which has withstood its advances, and so it is a most desirable acquisition. Rose has received an intimation, that really amounts to a threat, it would be of mutual benefit should he submit gracefully. He, however, is adamant in his defiance, showing a commendable pugnacity that is admired by the trust's president himself. But in every battle we must look for the traitor and Rose's partner plays the Judas, so that the next morning finds Rose a ruined man, sold out to the trust by his own partner. Crushed in spirit, Rose goes home, where his wife is now acquainted with the disaster through the newspapers. The two children are amazed and hurt at their papa's cold negligence, and are at a loss to know why he should so ignore them, and they become little eavesdroppers at the door of the reception room into which Mr. and Mrs. Rose have gone to ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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children | See All (1) »

Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

8 September 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The heart interest is all through the film
23 August 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The child is omnipresent. Even magnates with their millions are not proof against them, and while this film is in no sense a true story, it represents what happens when children undertake to set crooked things straight. These two little ones insist upon seeing the president of the trust that ruined their father. The loss of the money was not what worried them, but they couldn't quite understand why their father was so indifferent to them. So when they found out they decided to take matters into their own hands and settle them, which they did in satisfactory fashion. Usually the child wins, and in this instance, while it may seem much overdrawn, it is merely another graphic illustration of the fact which everyone understands is true. When they bear home the letter from the trust president the consternation may be imagined. It is useless to undertake to describe anything like this. The heart interest is all through the film, and in these times anything, even a child, that gets the better of a trust, is a hero. - The Moving Picture World, September 24, 1910


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