In this Biograph subject a most powerful moral is presented against all forms of gambling, and it is indeed a convincing lesson to those given to such follies, for although the hero was ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Ruth Hart ...
...
Their Child
...
...
The Westerner
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
William J. Butler
Charles Craig ...
Frank Evans ...
...
Dell Henderson ...
...
At Card Game (unconfirmed)
Adolph Lestina ...
Edit

Storyline

In this Biograph subject a most powerful moral is presented against all forms of gambling, and it is indeed a convincing lesson to those given to such follies, for although the hero was rescued from his desperation by means of the game, still the ordeal he passed through was so terrible that he swore never to tempt fate again in the game of chance. At the solicitation of a friend, who paints his possibilities in brilliant hues, he uses his employer's money in stock gambling. His is the experience of so many others; he loses, and of course takes more in the vain hope of recouping. It is the old story. He finds his neck in the noose of desperation, particularly as he learns that his books are to be examined by the expert accountant. Discovery is inevitable, so he confesses to his employer, who grants him one day to make up the deficit. It seems hoping against hope, but he goes home and tells his wife of his troubles and she allows him to take her jewelry on which to raise a portion of ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 January 1910 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Flicker Flashbacks No. 1, Series 5 (1947) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

You Can't Buy Spirit
1 June 2004 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

The 35 year old D.W. Griffith may have convictions to write and direct, but one thing his short films lack is spirit. You can be the most technically gifted editor in the business, but if there is no soul in your film then it is just a waste of creativity. This eleven minute offering lacked flavour, colour, texture, variety and spirit. It was bland to watch and left absolutely no impression on me whatsoever. It needed a bit a of character and personality, something intimate and universal that would give the story some humanity. I rate this a 3 out of 10 because I'm surprised it was even commissioned to be made. Without a question of a doubt, this short film is a product of the conveyor belt of creativity.


0 of 8 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?