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The Lady and the Burglar (1910)

Professor Blackburn is an eminent lecturer, a man well past middle age. He has married a beautiful and charming young woman of whom he is deeply enamored. The young wife is very fond of the... See full summary »

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Mrs. Blackburn
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Professor Blackburn is an eminent lecturer, a man well past middle age. He has married a beautiful and charming young woman of whom he is deeply enamored. The young wife is very fond of the Professor, but he is so engrossed in his studies and the preparation of lectures on Egyptian hieroglyphics that he does not respond sufficiently to the ardent devotion of his wife. Mrs. Blackburn is constantly importuned by a previous suitor whom she had rejected, and though she declines at all times to listen to the handsome Lothario, she refrains from telling her husband anything about his advances. An automobile accident happens one day which has a great effect upon the domestic affairs of the Blackburns. A little girl is badly injured in the accident and Mrs. Blackburn picks her up and carries her to the child's home. There she meets the father of the child, a man of poor circumstances, whose appearance would indicate that he is of the lower strata of life. Mrs. Blackburn places the child upon ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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9 August 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Holds the attention closely to the last
8 August 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The dramatic elements in this piece are so badly mixed that few would be able to untangle them until they work out to their conclusion. The professor, the young wife, the gallant whose attentions are unwelcome but persistent, the burglar and his little daughter. The story becomes absorbing as the film passes, and the complications increase. Then comes the end, a denouement as unexpected as it is interesting. The acting is sympathetic and leads up to the end in a way that holds the attention closely to the last. The photography is clear, adding much to the pleasure the picture excites. The Edison scheme of toning the film different colors might be open to question if it were not used with so much discretion. As it is now done it adds to most films and sometimes one fancies it is a relief to the eye. One color may, under some circumstances, become monotonous, though this would never occur with an interesting film. The variety introduced by different tones is worth while considering as a phase of motion picture work. - The Moving Picture World, August 27, 1910


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