Jim Sweeney, alias Tom Nolan, and his confederate Ralph Harding are much wanted by the sheriffs of several Arizona counties and particularly by the one in which the two are carrying on ... See full summary »
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Jim Sweeney, alias Tom Nolan, and his confederate Ralph Harding are much wanted by the sheriffs of several Arizona counties and particularly by the one in which the two are carrying on their latest depredations. A third of $1,000 has been posted for the capture of Sweeney and so persistent has the sheriff been of later that Sweeney finally concludes the neighborhood is becoming alarmingly unhealthy and resolves to move. He and Harding ride to the secluded shack of the Sweeneys where they find the latter's wife. Unbeknownst to Jim, an affair has started between Martha, his wife, and his confederate, Harding, as is made evident in the first scene of the picture. The next scene shows the sheriff and his posse, just recently apprised of a cattle stealing campaign by Sweeney and his pal, leaving to search for the culprits. The trail is discovered, a hot chase follows, but the two elude their pursuers, each going separate ways. Jim, to his shack and Harding to the wilderness of the desert. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Western

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18 June 1910 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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A disagreeable scene worked out before one's eyes
3 July 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A dramatic Western picture, containing more tragedy than usually appears in these films. Two really diabolical schemes are hatched, and one succeeds. Because it does succeed a woman dies at the hands of her lover after she has arranged to betray her husband. Even though this picture has qualities winch stamp it as unusually good, one rises after seeing it with a feeling that it would have been better if one had not seen it. Undoubtedly such instances are common. Indeed, it may safely be assumed that they are too common, yet after all one does not like to face the unpleasant fact and see such a disagreeable scene worked out before one's eyes. Perhaps this feeling is a tribute, unconsciously paid to the picture. If it were not good, if it were not made real, it would scarcely cause such an impression. Only the best of them succeed in accomplishing that. - The Moving Picture World, July 2, 1910


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