Nellie is a struggling artist whose paintings lie unsold. Billy, a successful painter, loves her, but she tells him that she cannot marry until she sells her paintings. Billy recruits his ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Nellie Burt
...
Billy Hart
Anthony O'Sullivan ...
Hans Kessler
...
Gallery Owner
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kate Bruce ...
Buyer
Frank Evans ...
At Gallery
Ruth Hart ...
At Gallery (unconfirmed)
Guy Hedlund ...
At Gallery
Jeanie Macpherson ...
At Gallery
...
At Gallery
...
Buyer
Gertrude Robinson ...
At Gallery
...
Buyer
...
At Gallery
Edit

Storyline

Nellie is a struggling artist whose paintings lie unsold. Billy, a successful painter, loves her, but she tells him that she cannot marry until she sells her paintings. Billy recruits his friends to buy her paintings. At first she is excited by the sudden success, but when she learns the truth, Nellie leaves her sweetheart to accept the proposal of a rival painter. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 November 1909 (USA)  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Released as a split reel along with the drama In the Window Recess (1909). See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Disrespect for Actors
10 May 2004 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

I think the 34 year old D.W. Griffith had a disrespect for actors in the sense that he would not allow them to bring their own interpretation of a character to a story. What you see on screen is Griffith manifesting himself in various players simply because he couldn't act himself. If he didn't make so many short films, then he could be judged by his directing skills alone. As it stands, his treatment of his cast surfaces on the screen and you end up watching puppets guided by Griffith rather than actors. Mary Pickford could have given a lot more in this piece if she was empowered with the right to make changes to the script and take ownership of the role.


0 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss The Trick That Failed (1909) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?