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Ten Nights in a Barroom (1909)

This story is based upon the celebrated drama of that title, a story stronger and more impressive than any temperance lecture ever delivered from rostrum or preached from pulpit. Joe Morgan... See full summary »
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(as Frank Crane)
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This story is based upon the celebrated drama of that title, a story stronger and more impressive than any temperance lecture ever delivered from rostrum or preached from pulpit. Joe Morgan, an honest young workman, beloved and honored by all, a respected husband, father and friend, held in the highest esteem by his employers. His character and habits were temperate and upright. He shunned the saloon as one would shun sure death. The story tells of his terrible downfall, when upon one day he is lured by two "friends" to take his first drink. The demon rum takes possession of him, he becomes intoxicated and reckless, and his employer, finding him in that condition, takes him home. The wife is horrified and grief stricken. His conscience is stirred and he resolves never again to yield to temptation. But the poison is in his nerves and the next day finds him again at the barroom. The patient wife, waiting for his return, suspects the cause of his absence and sends her little ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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9 June 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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It is not a pleasant film, yet it is strong
2 October 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

If temperance advocates want any stronger advocate of total abstinence than this picture from the Essanay studio it would be difficult to find it. Based on the old story of that name, the acting is very realistic. One feels that the audience is indeed fortunate to be spared the scenes of all the nights. Those depicted are sufficient for the purpose. The recovery from the attack of delirium tremens, the recovery of the little girl, the return to work, the promotion and the last scene after seven years of sobriety are all pleasant. The effects of over-indulgence are perhaps more strongly emphasized by being offset by the happiness that comes from sobriety. It is not a pleasant film, yet it is strong and should be popular. But the Essanay photographer will be losing his job if he cannot do better. Patches of white, without the least detail, are not permissible in modern work. The cause is obvious to every photographer who knows his business, and we have seen "dupes" films in which the details and halftones were better rendered than in portions of this Essanay film. - The Moving Picture World, June 19, 1909


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