The Mexican Sweethearts (1909)

 |  Short  |  24 June 1909 (USA)
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A Mexican spitfire romances an American soldier to make her Mexican lover jealous. When the lover is about to kill his rival, she convinces him it was all a joke and the two reconcile.



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Credited cast:
The Señorita
Billy Quirk ...
American Soldier
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
James Kirkwood ...
Mexican in Bar
Charles Perley ...
The Señorita's Sweetheart (unconfirmed)
Mexican in Bar


The experience of Tantalus was never so chafing as a tantalizing sweetheart. The strength of this is better understood when we realize the impetuous nature of the Latin type of person. The Senorita, to tease her sweetheart, pretends love for an American soldier, and for a while it looks as if the little detachment of soldiers would be forced to bestow the last military honors on one of their number. However, by a clever trick, Senorita rights the impending wrong; the soldier escapes without a scar, and the sweethearts are left enjoying their cigarettes. This subject, while being short, is one of the most beautiful pieces of high-class acting ever attempted, the leading character being played by a native Spaniard. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Release Date:

24 June 1909 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs


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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?


Released as a split reel along with The Peachbasket Hat (1909). See more »

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User Reviews

The Interracial Theme
3 March 2004 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

The battle scenes that Griffith uses in his short films were an inspiration to Cecil B. DeMille. His portrayal of interracial alliances between the Mexicans and the Americans was an attempt to romanticize relations between the two communities, as well as the past. He was always a stickler for work was the 34 year old director. Sometimes he would film right the way through lunch. When he did pause for lunch he would furnish his wife and cast with steaks, and then offer sandwiches to his crew and extras. Because he failed as a stage actor, he wanted to compensate by making as many short films as possible to immortalise himself in celluloid.

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