Daniel Roberts is the father of two youngsters of about the same age, yet vastly different in their moral make-up. Frank is the model "good child" of the village, loved by his father and ... See full summary »
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Daniel Roberts is the father of two youngsters of about the same age, yet vastly different in their moral make-up. Frank is the model "good child" of the village, loved by his father and mother for his good behavior, while John is just the opposite, being unruly to his elders, always into mischief, and bringing mortification to his despairing parents. Ten years elapse, and we find John sowing his wild oats, while Frank obtains employment in a broker's office. While he stays late at the office nights, John entertains chorus girls at midnight suppers. John's conduct finally exasperates his father, and one night when he comes home intoxicated he is ordered from the house and told never to return until he has proven himself a man. During the twenty years that follow, Frank accumulates a vast fortune, but his extreme selfishness and miserliness causes him to neglect his parents, who are now growing old. Unable to pay the mortgage on their little home, the father and mother call at their ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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7 July 1909 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Connections

Remade as The Good-for-Nothing (1914) See more »

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They tell this excellent story so clearly
28 November 2014 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

Scenes in the ''wheat pit" have figured in many a novel for, as Mr. James Patten's recent exploits bear witness, they have all the elements of gambling and excitement, with their attendant gains and losses, and underlying them, the strong human interest of it all. The Essanay Company, therefore, shrewdly select a scene in the wheat pit as the climax of this ambitious film, in the course of which it comes as a great dramatic surprise. The author of the story evidently has a strong appreciation of effective situations, for he leads up to this climax quite naturally and without apparent effort. It is greatly to the credit of the Essanay Company that they tell this excellent story so clearly and vividly that the audience is enabled to follow it without effort or doubt. The acting in the piece is exceedingly good and convincing and the photography of it all that could be desired. It is certainly the most ambitious subject that the Essanay people have attempted, and we think that they have succeeded remarkably well in their work. We noticed that it was followed with breathless interest by the audience who saw it when we did. All through the acting of the old people and the bad brother was very effective, whilst the good brother was thoroughly manly and earnest. The wheat pit scene was full of excitement and movement. "The Black Sheep" is a great Essanay success. – The Moving Picture World, July 10, 1909


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