An early Biograph short in which two separate sequences of events collide and the leading man must save his lady from the villain. The first storyline involves a group of young adult ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Arthur V. Johnson ...
Linda Arvidson ...
Charles Inslee ...
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Edward Dillon ...
Policeman
George Gebhardt ...
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On Boardwalk
Guy Hedlund
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Marion Leonard
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Harry Solter ...
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Storyline

An early Biograph short in which two separate sequences of events collide and the leading man must save his lady from the villain. The first storyline involves a group of young adult beach-goers, particularly focusing on one couple in love. The other storyline involves a criminal who escapes from two policemen. The con eventually makes his way to the beach where the other group is frolicking. He takes the leading lady hostage out in a rowboat, and it is up to her man to save her. Written by bughouse

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Plot Keywords:

ocean | melodrama | See All (2) »

Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

22 September 1908 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Pretty Good Story-Telling
19 November 2004 | by (Ohio) – See all my reviews

Although it is relatively simple, this short feature is a decent example of how some pretty good story-telling can make a movie work better than the material itself would suggest. The film shows a fairly simple (though dramatic) situation on a beach, but by showing two parallel stories that led up to it, the movie creates a little more interest and suspense.

Using relatively extensive cross-cutting, "Where the Breakers Roar" starts with a group having fun on the beach, while nearby a mental patient escapes from his guards. The seaside scenes create a believable atmosphere, and the chosen title for the film suggests that this was meant to be an important feature of the story. There is not really all that much action until nearer to the end, but the cross-cutting does work in building things up. It still remains a little flat, because the characters remain non-descript, so that you never get used to caring about them very much.

It's at least average, or a bit above average, for the time and genre. With a little more development of the stories and/or characters, it could have been quite good, since the story-telling technique itself is good. It was not long before Griffith learned how to make you care about his characters, to increase your interest in his stories about them.


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