6.0/10
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2 user 1 critic

The Taming of the Shrew (1908)

Based on Shakespeare's play: Petruchio courts the bad-tempered Katharina, and tries to change her aggressive behavior.

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Harry Solter ...
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William J. Butler
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George Gebhardt ...
Charles Inslee ...
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Charles Moler
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Storyline

Based on Shakespeare's play: Two suitors have come to the home of the popular Bianca to court her. But her bad-tempered sister Katharina interrupts, deals with the men roughly and chases them out. Later she also assaults her music teacher. Only Petruchio, just arrived in town, wants to court Katharina. Her father eagerly agrees to arrange a wedding, and soon Petruchio and Katharina are locked in a battle of wills. Written by Snow Leopard

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Genres:

Short | Comedy | Romance

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Release Date:

10 November 1908 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

La fierecilla domada  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

A Solid Early Effort to Film the Story
6 March 2006 | by (Ohio) – See all my reviews

This is worth seeing as a solid early effort to film Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew", and it is also of interest as an early pairing of director D.W. Griffith and cinematographer Billy Bitzer. Although it now looks like a relatively unfinished attempt, for its time it is a creditable adaptation.

It's not surprising that the slapstick sequences work better than the rest of the story, since they do not rely very much on explanation or dialogue. Its other noticeable strength is the sets, which have a fair amount of detail for the time. Bitzer's photography usually catches the setting and the action well.

Some of the story developments and relationships among the characters are not fully explained, so either some inter-titles have been lost, or else it was assumed that the audience could fill in the details from being familiar with the story.

Certainly, audiences of the time could have enjoyed the comedy portions with only a passing memory of the plot. While the comic sequences themselves would not hold up against the later Keystone comedies or other such features of the mid-1910s, for 1908 they work well enough.


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