It would have taken more than the wonderful powers of deduction of a Sherlock Holmes to have dispelled the mystery that shrouded the disappearance of a case of jewels at the home of Robert ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Harry Solter ...
Mr. Jenkins
...
Mrs. Jenkins
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Linda Arvidson ...
The Nurse
John R. Cumpson ...
Smithson / Man at Broker's
Gladys Egan ...
Child
George Gebhardt ...
The Detective / The Mover
...
Crowd Member at Exchange
Charles Inslee ...
Man at Broker's
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Storyline

It would have taken more than the wonderful powers of deduction of a Sherlock Holmes to have dispelled the mystery that shrouded the disappearance of a case of jewels at the home of Robert Jenkins, a wealthy stockbroker, and although they were eventually brought to light, it was through a most remarkable accident. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins are getting ready for an evening at the opera, and. as usual Mrs. Jenkins is tantalizingly slow in her preparations, and is almost carried out of the house by the impatient Jenkins. Baby Jenkins is very much in evidence, and requires a bribe to induce her to remain contented with the maid. This Mrs. J. furnishes in the shape of a papier-maché doggie, the head of which is removed to find its interior filled with candy. Mrs. Jenkins is inclined to deck herself out in her diamonds, and takes the case from the strong-box, but in her anxiety to appease her husband's flustering, she hurriedly kisses baby and departs, forgetting all about the jewels. They are ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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melodrama | See All (1) »

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Drama | Short

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29 September 1908 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

The Camera Talks
19 November 2003 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

Even though there was no sound in this film, the 33 year old D.W. Griffith used the voice of the camera as narrative to tell the story. He obviously breathed life into the camera because subsequent directors like Cecil B. DeMille and Alfred Hitchcock gave more priority to the camera than actors.


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