Le manoir du diable
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The House of the Devil (1896) More at IMDbPro »Le manoir du diable (original title)


2017 | 2011

3 items from 2017


Review: Going in Both Directions—Julia Ducournau’s “Raw”

10 March 2017 11:10 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

France has a rich history of horror. There’s the sadomasochistic novels of the Marquis de Sade as well as the blood and guts of Grand Guignol theatre. In cinema, the horror lineage runs deep. There’s Georges Méliès’ shorts and trick films (The Haunted Castle [1896], The Four Troublesome Heads [1898]); the eye-slicing of Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel’s Un chien andalou (1929); Georges Franju’s nauseating documentary on slaughterhouses, Blood of the Beasts (1949), as well as his clinical and poetic Eyes Without a Face (1960); there’s Henri-Georges Clouzot’s nasty Diabolique (1955); and the rotting poetry of Jean Rollin’s collective work. Flash forward a few decades, to the mid-1990s and 2000s, where we find the intense and brutal "New French Extremity" films by Philippe Grandrieux, Bruno Dumont, Gaspar Noé, Marina de Van, and others. And there are the genre filmmakers creating work around the same time as the more »

Permalink | Report a problem


Psycho Pompous: Early Imperial Russian and Soviet Influences

27 January 2017 12:00 PM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Georges Méliès’ Le Manoir Du Diable signified the dawn of the horror film. A lost film, Esmeralda (1905), the first adaptation of Victor Hugo's The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, is the offical second installment in the genre. It was created by founding French director Alice Guy-Blaché at the dawn of the 20th Century, who would aid in revolutionizing the art as Gaumont's leading director, and one of the first experimenters with color and special effects in the medium. Her work was succeeded by another adaptation of Hugo's novel in 1911, with an ambitious version by Albert Capellani, another lost film. Though such powerful filmmakers were behind the first explorations into the horror genre on screen (followed by J. Searle Dawley's Frankenstein), it would not be until the early 1920s that horror would even...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


Psycho Pompous: An Introduction

18 January 2017 10:30 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

One of the most seminal aspects of any great industry or art form is the lasting impact the products or art have on the population at large. It is hard to believe that over a hundred years ago, the idea of blockbuster horror films was nothing short of lunacy. When Thomas Edison fully funded the first commercially-released horror film in 1910 (though the first horror film to be made was Georges Melies’ Le Manoir Du Diable in 1896), he would not realize that this magnificent piece of the silent era would be a commercial failure. Even in its infancy, the motion picture industry would release many major films in the United States in 1910, including movies that would come to shape how the industry would...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2011

3 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners