1-50 of 486 names.

Ben Affleck

American actor and filmmaker Benjamin Géza Affleck-Boldt was born on August 15, 1972 in Berkeley, California, and was raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His mother, Chris Anne (née Boldt), is a school teacher, and his father, Timothy Byers Affleck, is a social worker; the two are divorced. Ben has a younger brother, actor Casey Affleck, who was born in 1975. He is of mostly English, Irish, German, and Scottish ancestry. His middle name, "Géza", is after a family friend.

Affleck wanted to be an actor ever since he could remember, and his first acting experience was for a Burger King commercial, when he was on the PBS mini-series, The Voyage of the Mimi. It was also at that age when Ben met his lifelong friend and fellow actor, Matt Damon. They played little league together and took drama classes together. Ben's teen years consisted of mainly TV movies and small television appearances including Hands of a Stranger and The Second Voyage of the Mimi. He made his big introduction into feature films in 1993 when he was cast in Dazed and Confused. After that, he did mostly independent films like Kevin Smith's Mallrats and Chasing Amy which were great for Ben's career, receiving renowned appreciation for his works at the Sundance film festival. But the success he was having in independent films didn't last much longer and things got a little shaky for Ben. He was living in an apartment with his brother Casey and friend Matt, getting tired of being turned down for the big roles in films and being given the forgettable supporting ones. Since Matt was having the same trouble, they decided to write their own script, where they could call all the shots. So, after finishing the script for Good Will Hunting, they gave it to their agent, Patrick Whitesell, who showed it to a few Hollywood studios, finally being accepted by Castle Rock. It was great news for the two, but Castle Rock wasn't willing to give Ben and Matt the control over the project they were hoping for. It was friend Kevin Smith who took it to the head of Miramax who bought the script giving Ben and Matt the control they wanted and, in December 5, 1997, Good Will Hunting was released, making the two unknown actors famous. The film was nominated for 9 Academy Awards and won two, including Best Original Screenplay for Ben and Matt. The film marked Ben's breakthrough role, in which he was given for the first time the chance to choose roles instead of having to go through grueling auditions constantly.

Affleck chose such roles in the blockbusters Armageddon, Shakespeare in Love, and Pearl Harbor. In the early years of the 2000s, he also starred in the box office hits Changing Lanes, The Sum of All Fears, and Daredevil, as well as the disappointing comedies Gigli and Surviving Christmas. While the mid 2000s were considered a career downturn for Affleck, he received a Golden Globe nomination for his performance in Hollywoodland. In the several years following, he played supporting roles, including in the films Smokin' Aces, He's Just Not That Into You, State of Play, and Extract. He ventured into directing in 2007, with the thriller Gone Baby Gone, which starred his brother, Casey Affleck, and was well received. He then directed, co-wrote, and starred in The Town, which was named to the National Board of Review Top Ten Films of the year. For the political thriller Argo, which he directed and starred in, Affleck won the Golden Globe Award and BAFTA Award for Best Director, and the Academy Award, Golden Globe Award, and BAFTA Award for Best Picture (Affleck's second Oscar win).

In 2014, Affleck headlined the book adaptation thriller Gone Girl. He starred as Bruce Wayne/Batman in the superhero film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, briefly reprised the character in Suicide Squad, and will do so again in Justice League, and other sequels.

Affleck married actress Jennifer Garner in 2005. The couple has three children.

Cillian Murphy

Striking Irish actor Cillian Murphy was born in Douglas, the oldest child of Brendan Murphy, who works for the Irish Department of Education, and a mother who is a teacher of French. He has three younger siblings. Murphy was educated at Presentation Brothers College, Cork. He went on to study law at University College Cork, but dropped out after about a year. During this time Murphy also pursued an interest in music, playing guitar in various bands. Upon leaving University, Murphy joined the Corcadorca Theater Company in Cork, and played the lead role in "Disco Pigs", amongst other plays.

Various film roles followed, including a film adaptation of Disco Pigs. However, his big film break came when he was cast in Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later..., which became a surprise international hit. This performance earned him nominations for Best Newcomer at the Empire Awards and Breakthrough Male Performance at the MTV Movie Awards.

Murphy went on to supporting roles in high-profile films such as Cold Mountain and Girl with a Pearl Earring, and then was cast in two villain roles: Dr. Jonathan Crane, aka The Scarecrow, in Batman Begins and Jackson Rippner in Red Eye. Although slight in nature for a villain, Murphy's piercing blue eyes helped to create creepy performances and critics began to take notice. Manhola Dargis of the New York Times cited Murphy as a "picture-perfect villain", while David Denby of The New Yorker noted he was both "seductive" and "sinister".

Later that year, Murphy starred as Patrick "Kitten" Braden, an Irish transgender in search of her mother, in Neil Jordan's Breakfast on Pluto, a film adaptation of the Pat McCabe novel. Although the film was not a box office success, Murphy was nominated for a Golden Globes for Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical and he won Best Actor for the Irish Film and Television Academy Awards.

The following year, Murphy starred in Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes the Barley. The film was the most successful independent Irish film and won the Palm D'Or at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival. Murphy continued to take roles in a number of independent films, and also reprised his role as the Scarecrow in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight. Nolan is known for working with actors in multiple films, and cast Murphy in Inception, as Robert Fischer, the young heir of the multi-billion dollar empire, who was the target of DiCaprio's dream team.

Murphy continues to appear in high profile films such as In Time, Red Lights, and The Dark Knight Rises, the final film in Nolan's Batman trilogy.

Murphy is married to Yvonne McGuinness, an artist. The couple has two sons, Malachy and Carrick.

Christopher Nolan

Best known for his cerebral, often nonlinear story-telling, acclaimed writer-director Christopher Nolan was born on July 30, 1970 in London, England. Over the course of 15 years of film-making, Nolan has gone from low-budget independent films to working on some of the biggest blockbusters ever made.

At 7 years old, Nolan began making short movies with his father's Super-8 camera. While studying English Literature at University College London, he shot 16-millimetre films at U.C.L.'s film society, where he learned the guerrilla techniques he would later use to make his first feature, Following, on a budget of around $6,000. The noir thriller was recognized at a number of international film festivals prior to its theatrical release, and gained Nolan enough credibility that he was able to gather substantial financing for his next film.

Nolan's second film was Memento, which he directed from his own screenplay based on a short story by his brother Jonathan. Starring Guy Pearce, the film brought Nolan numerous honors, including Academy Award and Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Original Screenplay. Nolan went on to direct the critically acclaimed psychological thriller, Insomnia, starring Al Pacino, Robin Williams and Hilary Swank.

The turning point in Nolan's career occurred when he was awarded the chance to revive the Batman franchise in 2005. In Batman Begins, Nolan brought a level of gravitas back to the iconic hero, and his gritty, modern interpretation was greeted with praise from fans and critics alike. Before moving on to a Batman sequel, Nolan directed, cowrote and produced the mystery thriller The Prestige, starring Christian Bale and Hugh Jackman as magicians whose obsessive rivalry leads to tragedy and murder.

In 2008, Nolan directed, cowrote, and produced The Dark Knight which went on to gross more than a billion dollars at the world-wide box office. Nolan was nominated for a Directors Guild of America (D.G.A.) Award, Writers Guild of America (W.G.A.) Award and Producers Guild of America (P.G.A.) Award, and the film also received eight Academy Award nominations.

In 2010, Nolan captivated audiences with sci-fi thriller Inception, which he directed and produced from his own original screenplay. The thought-provoking drama was a world-wide blockbuster, earning more than $800,000,000 dollars and becoming one of the most discussed and debated films of the year. Among its many honors, Inception received four Academy Awards and eight nominations, including Best Picture and Best Screenplay. Nolan was recognized by his peers with D.G.A. and P.G.A. Award nominations, as well as a W.G.A. Award win for his work on the film.

One of the best-reviewed and highest-grossing movies of 2012, The Dark Knight Rises concluded Nolan's Batman trilogy. Due to his success rebooting the Batman character, Warner Bros. enlisted Nolan to produce their revamped Superman movie Man of Steel, which opened in the Summer of 2013.

Nolan currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife, producer Emma Thomas, and their children. Nolan and Thomas also have their own production company, Syncopy.

Christian Bale

Christian Charles Philip Bale was born in Pembrokeshire, Wales, UK on January 30, 1974, to English parents Jennifer "Jenny" (James) and David Charles Howard Bale. His mother was a circus performer and his father, who was born in South Africa, was a commercial pilot. The family lived in different countries throughout Bale's childhood, including England, Portugal, and the United States. Bale acknowledges the constant change was one of the influences on his career choice.

His first acting job was a cereal commercial in 1983; amazingly, the next year, he debuted on the West End stage in "The Nerd". A role in the 1986 NBC mini-series Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna caught Steven Spielberg's eye, leading to Bale's well-documented role in Empire of the Sun. For the range of emotions he displayed as the star of the war epic, he earned a special award by the National Board of Review for Best Performance by a Juvenile Actor.

Adjusting to fame and his difficulties with attention (he thought about quitting acting early on), Bale appeared in Kenneth Branagh's 1989 adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry V and starred as Jim Hawkins in a TV movie version of Treasure Island. Bale worked consistently through the 1990s, acting and singing in Newsies, Swing Kids, Little Women, The Portrait of a Lady, The Secret Agent, Metroland, Velvet Goldmine, All the Little Animals, and A Midsummer Night's Dream. Toward the end of the decade, with the rise of the Internet, Bale found himself becoming one of the most popular online celebrities around, though he, with a couple notable exceptions, maintained a private, tabloid-free mystique.

Bale roared into the next decade with a lead role in American Psycho, director Mary Harron's adaptation of the controversial Bret Easton Ellis novel. In the film, Bale played a murderous Wall Street executive obsessed with his own physicality - a trait for which Bale would become a specialist. Subsequently, the 10th Anniversary issue for "Entertainment Weekly" crowned Bale one of the "Top 8 Most Powerful Cult Figures" of the past decade, citing his cult status on the Internet. EW also called Bale one of the "Most Creative People in Entertainment", and "Premiere" lauded him as one of the "Hottest Leading Men Under 30".

Bale was truly on the Hollywood radar at this time, and he turned in a range of performances in the remake Shaft, Captain Corelli's Mandolin, the balmy Laurel Canyon, and Reign of Fire, a dragons-and-magic commercial misfire that has its share of defenders.

Two more cult films followed: Equilibrium and The Machinist, the latter of which gained attention mainly due to Bale's physical transformation - he dropped a reported 60+ pounds for the role of a lathe operator with a secret that causes him to suffer from insomnia for over a year.

Bale's abilities to transform his body and to disappear into a character influenced the decision to cast him in Batman Begins, the first chapter in Christopher Nolan's definitive trilogy that proved a dark-themed narrative could resonate with audiences worldwide. The film also resurrected a character that had been shelved by Warner Bros. after a series of demising returns, capped off by Batman and Robin's massive commercial and critical failure. A quiet, personal victory for Bale: he accepted the role after the passing of his father in late 2003, an event that caused him to question whether he would continue performing.

Bale segued into two indie features in the wake of Batman's phenomenal success: The New World and Harsh Times. He continued working with respected independent directors in 2006's Rescue Dawn, Werner Herzog's feature version of his earlier, Emmy-nominated documentary, Little Dieter Needs to Fly. Leading up to the second Batman film, Bale starred in The Prestige, the remake of 3:10 to Yuma, and a reunion with director Todd Haynes in the experimental Bob Dylan biography, I'm Not There..

Anticipation for The Dark Knight was spun into unexpected heights with the tragic passing of Heath Ledger, whose performance as The Joker became the highlight of the sequel. Bale's graceful statements to the press reminded us of the days of the refined Hollywood star as the second installment exceeded the box-office performance of its predecessor.

Bale's next role was the eyebrow-raising decision to take over the role of John Connor in the Schwarzenegger-less Terminator Salvation, followed by a turn as federal agent Melvin Purvis in Michael Mann's Public Enemies. Both films were hits but not the blockbusters they were expected to be.

For all his acclaim and box-office triumphs, Bale would earn his first Oscar in 2011 in the wake of The Fighter's critical and commercial success. Bale earned the Best Supporting Actor award for his portrayal of Dicky Eklund, brother to and trainer of boxer "Irish" Micky Ward, played by Mark Wahlberg. Bale again showed his ability to reshape his body with another gaunt, skeletal transformation.

Bale then turned to another auteur, Yimou Zhang, for the epic The Flowers of War, in which Bale portrayed a priest trapped in the midst of the Rape of Nanking. Bale earned headlines for his attempt to visit with Chinese civil-rights activist Chen Guangcheng, which was blocked by the Chinese government.

Bale capped his role as Bruce Wayne/Batman in The Dark Knight Rises; in the wake of the Aurora, Colorado tragedy, Bale made a quiet pilgrimage to the state to visit with survivors of the attack that left theatergoers dead and injured. He also starred in the thriller Out of the Furnace with Crazy Heart writer/director Scott Cooper, and the drama-comedy American Hustle, reuniting with David O. Russell.

Bale will re-team with The New World director Terrence Malick for two upcoming projects: Knight of Cups and an as-yet-untitled drama.

In his personal life, he devotes time to charities including Greenpeace and the World Wildlife Foundation. He lives with his wife, Sibi Blazic, and their daughter, Emmeline.

Jesse Eisenberg

Curly haired and with a fast-talking voice, Jesse Eisenberg is a movie actor, known for his Academy Award nominated role as Mark Zuckerberg in the 2010 film The Social Network. He has also starred in the films The Squid and the Whale, Adventureland, The Education of Charlie Banks, 30 Minutes or Less, Now You See Me and Zombieland. Additionally, he played Lex Luthor in the 2016 film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice.

Jesse Adam Eisenberg was born on October 5, 1983 in Queens, New York, and was raised in East Brunswick Township, New Jersey. His mother, Amy (Fishman), is a professional dressed-up clown who performed at children's birthday parties for a living in their hometown of East Brunswick for 20 years. His father, Barry Eisenberg, ran a hospital before moving on to become a college professor. Jesse has two sisters, Kerri and Hallie Kate Eisenberg, who was a popular child star. His family is Jewish (his ancestors came to the U.S. from Poland, Russia, and Ukraine).

He attended East Brunswick High School, but he didn't really enjoy school. From age 10, he performed in children's theater. Jesse had his first professional role in an off-Broadway play, "The Gathering". Before fame, he made his first television appearance role that came in 1999 when he was 16 with a show on Fox's Get Real, but the show was canceled in 2000. In his senior year of high school, he had landed his first film leading role in the 2002 film Roger Dodger. He won an award for "Most Promising New Actor" at the San Diego film festival.

Jesse attended the New School University, New York, where he was a liberal arts major, with a focus on Democracy and Cultural Pluralism. He also studied at The New School in New York City's Greenwich Village. He applied and was accepted to New York University but declined enrollment to complete a film role. He has been playing the drums since he was age 8.

His breakthrough role came in Zombieland. In 2010, he was nominated for Best Actor at the Golden Globes and Academy Awards for his role of Facebook's creator, Mark Zuckerberg, in the film, The Social Network. He also voiced Blu, a rare blue macaw, in the film Rio, and its sequel Rio 2. He starred alongside Aziz Ansari in the 2011 comedy 30 Minutes Or Less, and played himself in the 2013 comedy film He's Way More Famous Than You.

Morgan Freeman

With an authoritative voice and calm demeanor, this ever popular American actor has grown into one of the most respected figures in modern US cinema. Morgan was born on June 1, 1937 in Memphis, Tennessee, to Mayme Edna (Revere), a teacher, and Morgan Porterfield Freeman, a barber. The young Freeman attended Los Angeles City College before serving several years in the US Air Force as a mechanic between 1955 and 1959. His first dramatic arts exposure was on the stage including appearing in an all-African American production of the exuberant musical Hello, Dolly!.

Throughout the 1970s, he continued his work on stage, winning Drama Desk and Clarence Derwent Awards and receiving a Tony Award nomination for his performance in The Mighty Gents in 1978. In 1980, he won two Obie Awards, for his portrayal of Shakespearean anti-hero Coriolanus at the New York Shakespeare Festival and for his work in Mother Courage and Her Children. Freeman won another Obie in 1984 for his performance as The Messenger in the acclaimed Brooklyn Academy of Music production of Lee Breuer's The Gospel at Colonus and, in 1985, won the Drama-Logue Award for the same role. In 1987, Freeman created the role of Hoke Coleburn in Alfred Uhry's Pulitzer Prize-winning play Driving Miss Daisy, which brought him his fourth Obie Award. In 1990, Freeman starred as Petruchio in the New York Shakespeare Festival's The Taming of the Shrew, opposite Tracey Ullman. Returning to the Broadway stage in 2008, Freeman starred with Frances McDormand and Peter Gallagher in Clifford Odets' drama The Country Girl, directed by Mike Nichols.

Freeman first appeared on TV screens as several characters including "Easy Reader", "Mel Mounds" and "Count Dracula" on the Children's Television Workshop (now Sesame Workshop) show The Electric Company. He then moved into feature film with another children's adventure, Who Says I Can't Ride a Rainbow!. Next, there was a small role in the thriller Blade; then he played Casca in Julius Caesar and the title role in Coriolanus. Regular work was coming in for the talented Freeman and he appeared in the prison dramas Attica and Brubaker, Eyewitness, and portrayed the final 24 hours of slain Malcolm X in Death of a Prophet. For most of the 1980s, Freeman continued to contribute decent enough performances in films that fluctuated in their quality. However, he really stood out, scoring an Oscar nomination as a merciless hoodlum in Street Smart and, then, he dazzled audiences and pulled a second Oscar nomination in the film version of Driving Miss Daisy opposite Jessica Tandy. The same year, Freeman teamed up with youthful Matthew Broderick and fiery Denzel Washington in the epic Civil War drama Glory about freed slaves being recruited to form the first all-African American fighting brigade.

His star continued to rise, and the 1990s kicked off strongly with roles in The Bonfire of the Vanities, Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, and The Power of One. Freeman's next role was as gunman Ned Logan, wooed out of retirement by friend William Munny to avenge several prostitutes in the wild west town of Big Whiskey in Clint Eastwood's de-mythologized western Unforgiven. The film was a sh and scored an acting Oscar for Gene Hackman, a directing Oscar for Eastwood, and the Oscar for best picture. In 1993, Freeman made his directorial debut on Bopha! and soon after formed his production company, Revelations Entertainment.

More strong scripts came in, and Freeman was back behind bars depicting a knowledgeable inmate (and obtaining his third Oscar nomination), befriending falsely accused banker Tim Robbins in The Shawshank Redemption. He was then back out hunting a religious serial killer in Se7en, starred alongside Keanu Reeves in Chain Reaction, and was pursuing another serial murderer in Kiss the Girls.

Further praise followed for his role in the slave tale of Amistad, he was a worried US President facing Armageddon from above in Deep Impact, appeared in Neil LaBute's black comedy Nurse Betty, and reprised his role as Alex Cross in Along Came a Spider. Now highly popular, he was much in demand with cinema audiences, and he co-starred in the terrorist drama The Sum of All Fears, was a military officer in the Stephen King-inspired Dreamcatcher, gave divine guidance as God to Jim Carrey in Bruce Almighty, and played a minor role in the comedy The Big Bounce.

2005 was a huge year for Freeman. First, he he teamed up with good friend Clint Eastwood to appear in the drama, Million Dollar Baby. Freeman's on-screen performance is simply world-class as ex-prize fighter Eddie "Scrap Iron" Dupris, who works in a run-down boxing gym alongside grizzled trainer Frankie Dunn, as the two work together to hone the skills of never-say-die female boxer Hilary Swank. Freeman received his fourth Oscar nomination and, finally, impressed the Academy's judges enough to win the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his performance. He also narrated Steven Spielberg's War of the Worlds and appeared in Batman Begins as Lucius Fox, a valuable ally of Christian Bale's Bruce Wayne/Batman for director Christopher Nolan. Freeman would reprise his role in the two sequels of the record-breaking, genre-redefining trilogy.

Roles in tentpoles and indies followed; highlights include his role as a crime boss in Lucky Number Slevin, a second go-round as God in Evan Almighty with Steve Carell taking over for Jim Carrey, and a supporting role in Ben Affleck's directorial debut, Gone Baby Gone. He co-starred with Jack Nicholson in the breakout hit The Bucket List in 2007, and followed that up with another box-office success, Wanted, then segued into the second Batman film, The Dark Knight.

In 2009, he reunited with Eastwood to star in the director's true-life drama Invictus, on which Freeman also served as an executive producer. For his portrayal of Nelson Mandela in the film, Freeman garnered Oscar, Golden Globe and Critics' Choice Award nominations, and won the National Board of Review Award for Best Actor.

Recently, Freeman appeared in RED, a surprise box-office hit; he narrated the Conan the Barbarian remake, starred in Rob Reiner's The Magic of Belle Isle; and capped the Batman trilogy with The Dark Knight Rises. Freeman has several films upcoming, including the thriller Now You See Me, under the direction of Louis Leterrier, and the science fiction actioner Oblivion, in which he stars with Tom Cruise.

George Clooney

George Timothy Clooney was born on May 6, 1961, in Lexington, Kentucky, to Nina Bruce (née Warren), a former beauty pageant queen, and Nick Clooney, a former anchorman and game show host (who was also the brother of singer Rosemary Clooney). He has Irish, English, and German ancestry. Clooney spent most of this youth in Ohio and Kentucky, and graduated from Augusta High School. He was very active in sports such as basketball and baseball, and tried out for the Cincinnati Reds, but was not offered a contract.

After his cousin, Miguel Ferrer, got him a small part in a feature film, Clooney began to pursue acting. His first major role was on the sitcom E/R as "Ace", an orderly. More roles soon followed, including "George Burnett", the handsome handyman on The Facts of Life; "Booker Brooks", a supervisor on Roseanne; and "Detective James Falconer" on Sisters. Clooney had his breakthrough when he was cast as "Dr. Doug Ross" on the award-winning drama series, ER, opposite Anthony Edwards, Noah Wyle, and Julianna Margulies.

While filming "ER", Clooney starred in a number of high profile film roles, such as Robert Rodriguez's From Dusk Till Dawn, and One Fine Day, opposite Michelle Pfeiffer. In 1997, Clooney took on the role of "Batman" in Joel Schumacher's Batman & Robin. The film was a moderate success in the box office, but was slammed by critics, notably for the nipple-laden Bat suit. Clooney went on to star in Steven Soderbergh's Out of Sight, Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line, and David O. Russell's Three Kings.

In 1999, Clooney left "ER" (though he would return for the season finale) and appeared in a number of films, including O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Perfect Storm, and Ocean's Eleven. Collaborating once again with Steven Soderbergh, "Ocean's Eleven" received critical acclaim, earned more than $450 million at the box office, and spawned two sequels: Ocean's Twelve and Ocean's Thirteen.

In 2002, Clooney made his directorial debut with Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, an adaptation of TV producer Chuck Barris's autobiography. This was the first film under the banner of "Section Eight Productions", a production company he founded with Steven Soderbergh. The company also produced many acclaimed films, including Far from Heaven, Syriana, A Scanner Darkly, and Good Night, and Good Luck.. Clooney won his first Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in "Syriana", and was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay for "Good Night, and Good Luck".

In 2006, "Section Eight" was shut down so that Soderbergh could concentrate on directing, and Clooney founded a new production company, "Smokehouse Productions", with his friend and long-time business partner, Grant Heslov.

Clooney went on to produce and star in Michael Clayton (which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor), directed and starred in Leatherheads, and took leading roles in Burn After Reading, The Men Who Stare at Goats, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Jason Reitman's Up in the Air. Clooney received critical acclaim for his performance in "Up in the Air" and was nominated for several awards, including a Golden Globe and Academy Award. He didn't win that year, but took home both Best Actor awards (as well as countless nominations) for his role as a father who finds out his wife was unfaithful as she lay in a coma in Alexander Payne's The Descendants. Throughout his career, Clooney has been heralded for his political activism and humanitarian work. He has served as one of the "United Nations Messengers of Peace" since 2008, has been an advocate for the Darfur conflict, and organized the "Hope for Haiti" telethon, to raise money for the victims of the 2010 earthquake. In March of 2012, Clooney was arrested for civil disobedience while protesting at the Sudanese embassy in Washington, D.C.

Clooney was married to actress Talia Balsam, from 1989 until 1993. After their divorce, he swore he would never marry again. Michelle Pfeiffer and Nicole Kidman bet him $10,000 that he would have children by the age of 40, and sent him a check shortly after his birthday. Clooney returned the funds and bet double or nothing he wouldn't have children by the age of 50. Although he has remained a consummate bachelor, Clooney has had many highly publicized relationships, including with former WWE wrestler Stacy Keibler. In 2014, he married lawyer and activist Amal Clooney.

Stana Katic

Stana Katic just completed 8 seasons as Kate Beckett on Castle. The ABC hit series brought in over 10 million viewers weekly and is in the top five syndicated series in Spain, France, the UK, Italy, and Germany.

In 2015, Stana completed two feature films - The Rendezvous directed by Amin Matalqa and Sister Cities based on the play by Colette Freedman. Both films are slated for a Fall 2016 release.

Stana's other feature film work includes: CBGB about the Punk Rock club in NYC, Big Sur based on the Jack Kerouac novel, The Polish Brothers' For Lovers Only, Frank Miller's film The Spirit, Robert Benton's Feast of Love, The Double with Richard Gere and Bond installment Quantum of Solace with Daniel Craig.

Katic has three award nominations and seven wins - including three People's Choice Awards, a PRISM Award, and three TV Guide Awards. Katic plays multiple sports and often performs her own stunts. Katic has voiced characters for hit video games & animated features- Talia al Ghul (Batman: Arkham City) and Louis Lane listed among them. In 2008 she established her own production company, Sine Timore Films, which in Latin means Irreverent. The film company is currently in development with several TV and movie projects, first being Elephant Winter, written by Ernie Contreras to be directed by Holly Dale.

In 2010, Katic started a non-profit organization called The Alternative Travel Project, a global initiative encouraging people to go car-free for just one day. The Alternative Travel Project (ATP) focuses efforts on creating a worldwide community of people looking to enjoy the social, health and environmental benefits of traveling alternatively.

Katic currently resides in Los Angeles, speaks five languages, and holds dual citizenship in the United States and Canada.

Katie Holmes

Born two months premature at four pounds, Kate Noelle Holmes made her first appearance on December 18, 1978, in Toledo, Ohio. She is the daughter of Kathleen Ann (Craft), a philanthropist, and Martin Joseph Holmes, Sr., a lawyer. She is of German, Irish, and English ancestry. Her parents have said that her strong-willed personality is probably from being born premature. Being the youngest in the Holmes clan, completing the family of three other sisters and one brother, Katie was always the baby.

As a teenager, she began attending modeling school. When she was sixteen, her teacher invited her to go to a modeling competition with other girls from her class. She competed in the International Modeling and Talent Association by singing, dancing, and reciting a monologue from To Kill a Mockingbird. By the end of that time in New York, Katie won many awards. But she said she didn't want to model because it wasn't challenging enough. So when she was seventeen, Katie went to Los Angeles to audition for movies. Luckily, on her second audition, she was cast in the movie, The Ice Storm, directed by Ang Lee. Katie's character was Libbets Casey, a rich New Yorker, who is pursued by two of the main characters. It was a small part, but it marked the beginning of her professional acting career.

After the excitement of her first movie, Katie began sending in audition tapes for pilot shows. During that time, she was also starring in her all-girls Catholic high school musical, Damn Yankees, as Lola. After Kevin Williamson received her audition tape for his new show, Dawson's Creek, the producers wanted her to come to Hollywood right away and read live for them. But because they wanted her to come on the opening night for Damn Yankees, Katie had to tell them she couldn't make it. Fortunately, the show's producers wanted her so much for that role, they rescheduled her callback and the result was she got the part as Joey Potter. During her first year with Dawson's Creek, Katie was able to do two movies, Disturbing Behavior and Go, and, for the former, she won Best Breakthrough Female Performance in the 1999 MTV Movie Awards.

The following year, she starred next to Michael Douglas in Wonder Boys, playing Hannah Green, a published author and a boarder at her teacher's (Douglas) house, who has a crush on him, and tries to seduce him. Her first leading role came in 2002, with Abandon. She played a college student named Katie Burke, who is haunted by the mysterious disappearance of her boyfriend who vanished two years prior. With Dawson's Creek coming to a close after six years in May of 2003, it was a bittersweet thing for all the cast. Accustomed to being in North Carolina filming ten months out of a year, the cast members now had the opportunity to make more movies.

Katie demonstrated this in October, when she had two new movies, Pieces of April and The Singing Detective, coming out in that month alone. Pieces of April is a charming Thanksgiving movie about April (Holmes), the black sheep of her family, who wants to give her family the perfect dinner before her mother passes on. The Singing Detective is a dark musical where the main character (Robert Downey Jr.) is a writer in a hospital for skin conditions who writes a dark world of seduction and murder in his mind. Katie Holmes plays the kind Nurse Mills who tends to his every need. She also gets to lip sync and dance in this movie. In 2004, she starred in the romantic movie First Daughter, in which she played the President's (Michael Keaton) daughter, Samantha, who wants to go to college without any Secret Service tagging along. In 2005, Holmes co-starred in Batman Begins, where she played Rachel Dawes, a childhood sweetheart and love interest to Batman/Bruce Wayne.

Gary Oldman

Gary Oldman is a talented British born movie actor who played Sid Vicious in Sid & Nancy, Drexl in True Romance, and George Smiley in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. He starred in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and the remake of RoboCop. He is also an English filmmaker, musician and author. Renowned for his "big" acting style, Oldman is one of the most celebrated thespians of his generation, with a diverse career encompassing theatre, film and television.

Gary Oldman was born on March 21, 1958 in New Cross, London, England, the son of Kathleen (Cheriton), a homemaker, and Leonard Bertram Oldman, a welder.

For most of his career he was best-known for playing over-the-top antagonists such as the role of Russian terrorist Egor Korshunov in the 1997 blockbuster Air Force One, though he has recently reached a new audience with heroic roles in the Harry Potter and Dark Knight franchises. In amazing trivia, he was in Batman Begins and The Fifth Element.

Oldman won a scholarship to Britain's Rose Bruford Drama College, in Sidcup, Kent, where he received a B.A. in theatre arts in 1979. He subsequently studied with the Greenwich Young People's Theatre and went on to appear in a number of plays throughout the early '80s, including "The Pope's Wedding," for which he received Time Out's Fringe Award for Best Newcomer of 1985-1986 and the British Theatre Association's Drama Magazine Award as Best Actor for 1985. Before fame, he was employed as a worker in assembly lines, and as a porter in an operating theater. He also got jobs selling shoes and beheading pigs while supporting his early acting career. He was also in the movie The Dark Knight with Heath Ledger.

His film debut was Remembrance, though his most-memorable early role came when he played Sex Pistol Sid Vicious in the biopic Sid and Nancy picking up the Evening Standard Film Award as Best Newcomer. He then received a Best Actor nomination from BAFTA for his portrayal of '60s playwright Joe Orton in Prick Up Your Ears.

In the 1990s, Oldman brought to life a series of iconic real-world and fictional villains including Lee Harvey Oswald in JFK, the title character in Dracula, Drexl Spivey in True Romance, Stansfield in Léon: The Professional, Jean-Baptiste Emanuel Zorg in The Fifth Element and Ivan Korshunov in Air Force One. That decade also saw Oldman portraying Ludwig van Beethoven in biopic Immortal Beloved.

Oldman scored the coveted role of Sirius Black in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, giving him a key part in one of the highest-grossing franchises ever. He reprised that role in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Oldman also took on the iconic role of Detective James Gordon in writer-director Christopher Nolan's Batman Begins, a role he played again in The Dark Knight and The Dark Knight Rises. Prominent film critic Mark Kermode, in reviewing The Dark Knight, wrote, "the best performance in the film, by a mile, is Gary Oldman's ... it would be lovely to see him get a[n Academy Award] nomination because actually, he's the guy who gets kind of overlooked in all of this."

Oldman co-starred with Jim Carrey in the 2009 version of A Christmas Carol in which Oldman played three roles. He had a starring role in David Goyer's supernatural thriller The Unborn, released in 2009. In 2010, Oldman co-starred with Denzel Washington in The Book of Eli. He also played a lead role in Catherine Hardwicke's Red Riding Hood. Oldman voiced the role of villain Lord Shen and was nominated for an Annie Award for his performance in Kung Fu Panda 2.

In 2011, Oldman portrayed master spy George Smiley in the adaptation of John le Carré's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and the role scored Oldman his first Academy Award nomination. In 2014, he played one of the lead humans in the science fiction action film Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Also in 2014, Oldman starred alongside Joel Kinnaman, Abbie Cornish, Michael Keaton, and Samuel L. Jackson in the remake of RoboCop, as Norton, the scientist who creates RoboCop. Also that year, Oldman starred in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes as one of the leads alongside Jason Clarke and Keri Russell.

Aside from acting, Oldman tried his hand at writing and directing for Nil by Mouth. The movie opened the Cannes Film Festival in 1997, and won Kathy Burke a Best Actress prize at the festival.

Oldman has three children - one with first wife Lesley Manville, and two with third wife Donya Fiorentino. He married Alexandra Edenborough on December 31, 2008 until they divorced in January 2015. He was married to actress Uma Thurman from 1990 to 1992. He married his fourth wife Alexandra Edenborough in 2008 but the couple divorced in 2015. He has three sons named Alfie, Gulliver and Charlie.

Val Kilmer

Val Kilmer was born in Los Angeles, California, to Gladys Swanette (Ekstadt) and Eugene Dorris Kilmer, who was a real estate developer and aerospace equipment distributor. His mother, born in Indiana, was from a Swedish family, and his father was from Texas. Val studied at Hollywood's Professional's School and, in his teens, entered Juilliard's drama program. His professional acting career began on stage, and he still participates in theater; he played Hamlet at the 1988 Colorado Shakespeare Festival. His film debut was in the 1984 spoof Top Secret!, wherein he starred as blond rock idol Nick Rivers. He was in a number of films throughout the 1980s, including the 1986 smash Top Gun. Despite his obvious talent and range, it wasn't until his astonishingly believable performance as Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's The Doors that the world sat up and took notice. Kilmer again put his good baritone to use in the movie, performing all of the concert pieces. Since then, he has played two more American legends, Elvis Presley in True Romance and Doc Holliday in Tombstone. In July 1994, it was announced that Kilmer would be taking over the role of Batman/Bruce Wayne from Michael Keaton.

Alicia Silverstone

Alicia Silverstone was born on October 4, 1976 in San Francisco, California, the youngest of three children. She is the daughter of Didi (Radford), a former flight attendant, and Monty Silverstone, a real-estate investor. Her English-born father is from a Jewish family, while her Scottish-born mother converted to Judaism. Alicia's career began at the tender age of six, when her father took some photos of his young daughter, which eventually led to her getting several television commercials. After a guest spot on The Wonder Years as a literal "dream girl", she moved on to movies. She landed a role in The Crush, a sort of Fatal Attraction for teenagers in which she portrayed a disturbed young girl obsessed with an older man. The nasty little role did not impress the critical establishment but it wowed its target audience: teenagers. In fact, the role won her the 1994 MTV Movie Award for "Best Villain" and "Breakthrough Performance". It is interesting to note that during the filming of the movie, Alicia became an emancipated minor in order to get around child labor laws which would have interfered with her working hours. She was a dedicated actress from early on.

The film also caught the attention of Aerosmith, who hired her to appear in a string of their music videos. The first of them, "Cryin'", was voted the #1 video of all time on MTV. Silverstone was definitely a hit with the MTV crowd, but larger commercial success still eluded her. That all changed when she landed the role of Cher in Amy Heckerling's Clueless. Cher was the antithesis of Alicia's role in The Crush; this time around, she was a rich, naive yet endearing girl from Beverly Hills in search of love in the 1990s. The film was a huge box-office hit and wowed both audiences and critics alike and demonstrated Alicia's strength and bankability. She was hailed as the woman of the hour, and branded the spokeswoman for an emerging young generation. She signed a deal with Columbia TriStar worth $10 million and got the coveted role of Batgirl in the Batman franchise. Also, as part of the package, she got a three-year first-look deal for her own production company, First Kiss Productions. The first film released by First Kiss was Excess Baggage.

Zack Snyder

Zachary Edward "Zack" Snyder (born March 1, 1966) is an American film director, film producer, and screenwriter, best known for action and science fiction films. Snyder made his feature film debut with the 2004 remake Dawn of the Dead and has gone on to be known for his comic book movies and superhero films, including 300 (2007), Watchmen (2009), Man of Steel (2013) and its upcoming sequel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016). Snyder is the co-founder of Cruel and Unusual Films, a production company he established in 2004, alongside his wife Deborah Snyder and producing partner Wesley Coller.

Sean Young

Mary Sean Young was born on November 20, 1959 in Louisville, Kentucky. She is the daughter of Lee Guthrie (née Mary Lee Kane), an Emmy-nominated producer, screenwriter, public relations executive, and journalist, and Donald Young, Jr., an Emmy award winning television news producer and journalist. She has Irish, English, and Swiss-German ancestry. She grew up with an older brother Donald Young III and a sister Cathleen Young in Cleveland, Ohio. She attended Cleveland Heights High School, and then transferred to and graduated from Interlochen Arts Academy. A trained dancer, she studied at the School of American Ballet in New York City, and did some modeling. Sean Young began a promising film career by acting in a Merchant-Ivory film Jane Austen in Manhattan for Academy Award nominated director James Ivory, She followed that up in the comedy hit film Stripes for Academy Award nominated producer-director Ivan Reitman. Soon, important directors were casting her in their films, such as Garry Marshall in Young Doctors in Love, Academy Award nominee David Lynch in Dune, and Academy Award nominee Ridley Scott in Blade Runner in what is her most respected film. 1987 was a big year for her, since she appeared in two big movies. Academy Award winner Oliver Stone cast her in the hit film Wall Street but she clashed openly with him and with co-star Charlie Sheen and her role was drastically cut. However, her other hit film No Way Out, which involved a famous steamy scene in the backseat of a limousine with Kevin Costner, gave her star status. She was at the height of her fame, which led to her being cast as Vicky Vale in Batman. She had an accident while she was training for the film. As a result, she lost the role to Kim Basinger for what turned out to be the biggest hit of 1989. Young's loss didn't stop there. In 1988, she made a flop film with James Woods titled The Boost. Woods accused her of exotic harassment, including leaving a disfigured doll outside his home and leaving scary phone calls to his then-fiancée. Young denied an affair with him or of harassing him, since she was in a long relationship with actor/singer Robert Lujan, whom she had met on a TV mini-series in 1985. They settled out of court, but the bad publicity hurt her career very deeply while Woods remained unscathed. Hollywood producers now saw her as unstable and a loose cannon and stopped considering her for big movies. She was dropped from Dick Tracy in favor of Glenne Headly. The "Batman" franchise decided to make a sequel to the 1989 blockbuster with Batman Returns, but the producers wouldn't see Young for the role of Catwoman, She was outraged and went on national television, dressed up as Catwoman, and complained about how the producers should have had the courtesy to see her especially since she had been part of the original cast of the first Batman movie before her accident had her being replaced. This stunt, too, turned into a public relations mess, and the role of Catwoman went to Michelle Pfeiffer. Young put on a brave face and gamely moved on to do comedies Fatal Instinct for director Carl Reiner, and Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, the latter's box office success made Jim Carrey a star, who immediately landed the role of the Riddler in the Batman sequel. The film also raised Courteney Cox's profile, since she soon landed the hit TV show "Friends" which made her a household name. Sean thought the film's success would benefit her as well, especially since Academy Award-nominated directors such as Gus Van Sant and Ismail Merchant cast her in their films. However, these films weren't hits, and Hollywood kept giving her lackluster roles in mediocre films. Heartbroken, she married Lujan and moved to Arizona, where she had two sons, but they divorced in 2002. She suffered other losses as well, bearing the painful deaths of her father (in 1995) and her mother (in 2012). There were some bizarre incidents along the way: her heckling a winner at the Director's Guild of America Award show in 2008, her arrest at the 2012 Academy Award after-party when she slapped a security guard. She went to rehab for her alcohol problem and also appeared on the reality show "Celebrity Rehab". Since then, she has mellowed, because she had reconciled with her ex-husband and her children are now grown. She branched out to do stage work, including the Los Angeles production of "Stardust" and the Northport production of "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike" for which she received a good review from the "New York Times." In her 50s, she is keeping busy, by acting in several projects and trying to start a directing career.

Ben McKenzie

Ben McKenzie was born Benjamin McKenzie Schenkkan in Austin, Texas on September 12, 1978, to Mary Frances (Victory), a poet, and Pieter Meade Schenkkan, an attorney. His uncle is playwright Robert Schenkkan. Ben is of Dutch Jewish (from his paternal grandfather), English, and Scottish descent. He attended Austin High School, and played wide receiver and defensive back for the school's football team. From 1997-2001, he attended the University of Virginia, where he majored in Foreign Affairs and Economics.

McKenzie got into acting during his first few years at the University of Virginia, where he appeared in "Measure for Measure" and "Zoo Story." After graduation he moved to New York and appeared off-Broadway in "Life is a Dream" at the SoHo Rep. Additionally, he performed in numerous productions at the Williamstown Theatre Festival, including "Street Scene" and "The Blue Bird." He relocated to Los Angeles in late 2001. His early TV appearances included roles on The District, JAG and Mad TV.

In 2003, FOX premiered the television series The O.C., about affluent teenagers with stormy personal lives who reside in scenic Orange County, California. The show became an overnight success and it put McKenzie on the map as Ryan Atwood.

While appearing in 'The O.C.', McKenzie made his feature film debut in 'Junebug' opposite Amy Adams. The film received high praise at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival. He also appeared in a pivotal role in the 2007 film '88 Minutes', which starred Al Pacino. McKenzie's first starring role in a feature film was in the 2008 indie release 'Johnny Got His Gun.' The movie premiered at the Paramount Theater in Austin, TX, McKenzie's hometown, prior to playing art houses where it garnered excellent reviews for his solo performance.

April 9, 2009 NBC replaced the long-running series 'E.R.' after 15 years with a new cop drama, Southland, starring McKenzie as rookie police officer Ben Sherman.

McKenzie is playing Jim Gordon in the Batman-themed series Gotham, beginning in September 2014.

Will Arnett

Will Arnett is a Canadian-American actor, voice actor, and comedian. He played George Oscar "Gob" Bluth II in the Fox series Arrested Development. He also appeared in films such as The Lego Movie (2014), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014) Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows (2016) and The Lego Batman Movie (2017). Arnett also voices the title character of Netflix's original animated series BoJack Horseman.

Eric Roberts

One of Hollywood's edgier, more intriguing characters running around and about for decades, Eric Anthony Roberts started life in Biloxi, Mississippi. He is the son of Betty Lou (Bredemus) and Walter Grady Roberts, one-time actors and playwrights. His siblings are actors Lisa Roberts Gillan and Julia Roberts, and he grew up in Atlanta, Georgia. He began his acting career at age 5 in a local theater company called the "Actors and Writers Workshop", founded by his late father. After his schooling at Grady High, he studied drama at age 17 in London for two years at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts, then returned to the States and continued his studies at the American Academy in New York. He made his NY stage debut in "Rebel Women" in 1976 at age 20 and appeared in regional productions, once playing the newspaper boy in a production of "A Streetcar Named Desire" starring Shirley Knight and Glenn Close.

After appearing in such daytime soaps as Another World and How to Survive a Marriage, his career began to shift fast forward when he copped a leading role in a major film. In King of the Gypsies, based on Peter Maas' best-seller about a fracturing dynasty of New York City gypsies, he made his debut alongside an intimidating roster of stars including Judd Hirsch, Susan Sarandon, Shelley Winters and Sterling Hayden. Young Eric held his own expertly (winning a Golden Globe nomination) while his burning intensity and brooding charm marked sure signs of star potential. After this, he won the lead opposite Milo O'Shea in the 1980 stage production of "Mass Appeal". He suffered serious injuries in a car accident during his nascent film career but lost no fans by the time he returned to co-star with Sissy Spacek as a small-town stranger in Raggedy Man. It was, however, his stark and frightening portrayal of two-bit hustler Paul Snider, the cast-off boyfriend who slays Playmate-turned-movie starlet Dorothy Stratten (played by Mariel Hemingway) in Star 80 that really put him on the movie map and earned him a second Golden Globe nomination. A wide range of fascinating, whacked-out roles were immediately offered to him on a silver plate. He played another dangerous streetwise hustler type in The Pope of Greenwich Village opposite fellow rebel Mickey Rourke; a cocky soda pop sales exec in the Australian comedy The Coca-Cola Kid; appeared with more charm and restraint opposite Rosanna Arquette in the offbeat romantic comedy Nobody's Fool and topped his prolific period off with an Academy Award nomination as a young prison escapee hiding out with Jon Voight aboard an out-of-control train in the ultra-violent, character-driven action adventure Runaway Train. Good things continued to happen when he was a replacement lead in the original run of "Burn This" and won a Theatre World Award for his 1988 Broadway debut.

A risky, no-holds-barred actor, he was often guilty of overacting if given half the chance. His film career began to slide in the late 1980s, appearing in more quantity than quality pictures. A series of missteps led to unheralded appearances in such bombs as the karate-themed Best of the Best; the NY urban thriller The Ambulance; the action western Blood Red, which took three years to release and is the only film Eric and his sister Julia Roberts appeared in together; and Rude Awakening when he filled in as a burned-out hippie opposite a Chong-less Cheech Marin. More under appreciated "B" filming came with the 1990s (Freefall, Sensation, The Nature of the Beast, etc.), while also chewing the scenery with a number of mobster types in TV-movies, including one as "Al Capone". He soon began appearing as flashy secondary villains and creepies that showcased other stars instead, such as Final Analysis starring Richard Gere, Heaven's Prisoners top lining Alec Baldwin, and The Dark Knight, part of the "Batman" series with Christian Bale and the late Heath Ledger.

Eric's undeniable, unconventional talent would occasionally mesh with the perfect role. At the Sundance Film Festival in 1996, he received critical applause for his starring role as a man dying of AIDS in the uplifting and emotional film It's My Party and earned more honors as a writer marked for murder in the mob-themed story La Cucaracha. He was also perfectly cast as one of the cold-blooded killers in the Emmy-nominated TV adaptation of Truman Capote's chiller In Cold Blood. Eric continued to appear sporadically on TV in such dramatic series as Law & Order: Criminal Intent, while sometimes showing a fun side as well in comedy (The King of Queens). His own series work included Less Than Perfect and, more recently, and in the cult program Heroes where promise for a longer participation ended with his character's death.

Recovered from a long-standing cocaine problem, Eric wed, for the first time, actress/writer Eliza Roberts (nee Garrett). They have appeared in such films as Killer Weekend and Final Approach. His daughter from a former relationship, Emma Roberts, is a newly popular and fast-rising "tween" actress from the series Unfabulous and has played youthful super-sleuth Nancy Drew on film. Eric's unpredictable, volatile nature which works so mesmerizing on screen has also led to troubling times off camera; his relationship with younger sis Julia Roberts has been seriously strained for quite some time.

Adam West

He breathed life into Batman. Adam West was born Billy (William) West Anderson in Walla Walla, Washington, to parents Otto West Anderson and his wife Audrey. At age 10 Adam had a cache of comic books, and "Batman" made a big impression on him--the comic hero was part bat-man (a la Count Dracula) and part world's greatest detective (a la Charlie Chan and Sherlock Holmes). When his mom remarried to a Dr. Paul Flothow, she took Adam and his younger brother, John, to Seattle. At 14 Adam attended Lakeside School, then went to Whitman College, where he got a degree in literature and psychology. During his last year of college he also married 17-year-old Billie Lou Yeager.

Adam got a job as a DJ at a local radio station, then enrolled at Stanford for post-grad courses. Drafted into the army, he spent the next 2 years starting military TV stations, first at San Luis Obispo, CA, then at Fort Monmouth, NJ. Afterwards, Adam and his wife toured Europe, visiting Germany, Switzerland and Italy's Isle of Capri. When the money ran out, he joined a childhood and college buddy, Carl Hebenstreit, who was starring in the kiddie program "The Kini Popo Show" in Hawaii. Adam would eventually replace Carl but not the other star, Peaches the Chimp. In 1956 he got a divorce and married a beautiful girl, originally from Tahiti, named Ngatokoruaimatauaia Frisbie Dawson (he called her "Nga" for short). They had a daughter, Jonelle, in 1957 and a son, Hunter, in 1958. In 1959 Adam came to Hollywood. He adopted the stage name "Adam West", which fit his roles, as he was in some westerns.

After 7 years in Tinseltown, he achieved fame in 1966 in his signature role as Batman, in the wildly popular ABC-TV series Batman (though he has over 60 movie and over 80 TV guest appearance credits, "Batman" is what the fans remember him for). The series, which lasted three seasons, made him not just nationally but internationally famous. The movie version, Batman: The Movie, earned Adam the "Most Promising New Star" award in 1967. The downside was that the "Batman" fame was partly responsible for ruining his marriage, and he would be typecast and almost unemployable for a while after the series ended (he did nothing but personal appearances for 2 years).

In 1970 he met and then married Marcelle Tagand Lear, and picked up two stepchildren, Moya and Jill. In addition, they had two children of their own: Nina West in 1976 and Perrin in 1979. You can't keep a good actor down -- Adam's career took off again, and he has been in about 50 projects since then: movies, TV-movies and sometimes doing voices in TV series. Adam wrote his autobiography "Back to the Batcave" in 1994. One of his most prized possessions is a drawing of Batman by Bob Kane with the inscription "To my buddy, Adam, who breathed life into my pen and ink creation".

Natalie Alyn Lind

Natalie Alyn Lind, the oldest of the three Lind sisters, all working actresses, grew up surrounded by the entertainment industry. Her mother is also an actress who starred in feature films and on several TV series including the hit drama "One Tree Hill". Natalie booked her first guest role at 4 years old on the same drama alongside her mom. As a young girl, she spent her time traveling back and forth between the series location in North Carolina and her home in California. Her father is an LA based producer. Upon her family's permanent return to LA, Natalie began to book a number of guest star appearances on such series as Lifetime's "Army Wives", Nickelodeon's "iCarly", CBS's ''Flashpoint'', Disney's "Wizards of Waverly Place", CBS's "Criminal Minds", as well as a lead role in Lifetime's "Playdate". Natalie has matured into a fine actress whose credits include TNT's "Murder In The First", ABC's "The Goldbergs", and Fox's "Gotham". Natalie recurs on the hit ABC comedy "The Goldbergs" as 'Dana Caldwell', currently in its third season. She also recurs on Fox's gritty crime drama "Gotham" playing one of her favorite villains Silver St. Cloud, a dream role for a diehard Batman fan. An added plus of working on Gotham is being able to explore the iconic sets and locations only a city like New York can provide. Natalie also has many upcoming projects in the works, including the Universal horror film, "Mockingbird". Although Natalie is a very busy actress, especially living a bi-coastal lifestyle, she finds time to hike with her dog Georgie, and write scripts. One charity Natalie and her family hold dear to their hearts is the Make-A-Wish Foundation, a charity that grants wishes to children diagnosed with life-threatening medical conditions. Being a surfer, Natalie is also active with the Save the Bay Foundation and the Mermaid project to save our beaches.

Ray Fisher

Ray Fisher is an American stage actor, best known for his role in the comedy The Good, the Bad and the Confused. On April 24, 2014, it was announced that Fisher will portray the superhero Victor Stone/Cyborg in the upcoming film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. and is expected to reprise his role in Justice League films. On October 15, 2014, it was announced that Fisher will reprise his role as Victor Stone/Cyborg in his own solo Cyborg film in 2020.

Callan Mulvey

Callan Mulvey (born 24 February 1975) is one of Australia's leading actors. Callan is best known for his leading roles in the television series Rush, Bikie Wars: Brothers in Arms and Underbelly, as well as Darren Ashton's feature film Thunderstruck. Callan first graced Australian screens in the hugely successful series Heartbreak High, as well as Head Start and McLeod's Daughters.

Callan, now firmly established internationally, made his American film debut in Katherine Bigelow's Zero Dark Thirty. His additional film credits include Scyllias in 300: Rise of an Empire, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, was part of an all-star ensemble cast for the critically acclaimed film The Turning, as well as starring opposite Katie Holmes in Miss Meadows, and opposite Sullivan Stapleton, Simon Pegg and Teresa Palmer in Kriv Stenders' crime thriller Kill Me Three Times. In 2016 Callan will be seen in Zack Snyder's highly anticipated Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, co-star in Delirium, a thriller produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, as a series regular on the Starz network's television drama series Power, Warner Bros' Warcraft, and Beyond Skyline with Frank Grillo.

Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee remains the greatest icon of martial arts cinema and a key figure of modern popular media. Had it not been for Bruce Lee and his movies in the early 1970s, it's arguable whether or not the martial arts film genre would have ever penetrated and influenced mainstream North American and European cinema and audiences the way it has over the past four decades.

The influence of East Asian martial arts cinema can be seen today in so many other film genres including comedies, action, drama, science fiction, horror and animation.....and they all have their roots in the phenomenon that was Bruce Lee.

Lee was born "Lee Jun Fan" November twenty-seventh 1940 in San Francisco, the son of Lee Hoi Chuen, a singer with the Cantonese Opera. Approximately one year later the family returned to Kowloon in Hong Kong and at the age of five years, a young Bruce begins appearing in children's roles in minor films including The Birth of Mankind and Fu gui fu yun. At the age of 12 Bruce commenced attending La Salle College. Bruce was later beaten up by a street gang, which inspired him to take up martial arts training under the tutelage of "Sifu Yip Man" who schooled Bruce in wing chun kung fu for a period of approximately five years. This was the only formalized martial arts training ever undertaken by Lee. The talented & athletic Bruce also took up cha-cha dancing and at the age of 18 won a major dance championship in Hong Kong.

However his temper and quick fists got him in trouble with the Hong Kong police on numerous occasions. His parents suggested that he head off to the United States. Lee landed in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1959 and worked in a close relative's restaurant. He eventually made his way to Seattle, Washington where he enrolled at university to study philosophy and found the time to practice his beloved kung fu techniques. In 1963 Lee met Linda Emery (later his wife) and also opened his first kung fu school at 4750 University Way. During the early half of the 1960s Lee became associated with many key martial arts figures in the USA including kenpo karate expert Ed Parker and tae kwon do master Jhoon Rhee. He made guest appearances at notable martial arts events including the Long Beach Nationals. Through one of these tournaments Bruce met Hollywood hair-stylist Jay Sebring who introduced him to T.V. producer William Dozier. Based on the runaway success of "Batman" Dozier was keen to bring the cartoon character of "The Green Hornet" to T.V. and was on the lookout for an East Asian actor to play the Green Hornet's sidekick, "Kato". Around this time Bruce also opened a second kung fu school in Oakland, California and relocated to Oakland to be closer to Hollywood.

Bruce's screen test was successful, and "The Green Hornet" starring Van Williams aired in 1966 with mixed success. His fight scenes were sometimes obscured by unrevealing camera angles, but his dedication was such that he insisted his character behave like a perfect bodyguard, keeping his eyes on whoever might be a threat to his employer except when the script made this impossible. The show was surprisingly terminated after only one season (twenty-six episodes), but by this time Lee was receiving more fan mail than the show's nominal star. He then opened a third branch of his kung fu school in Los Angeles and began providing personalized martial arts training to celebrities including film stars Steve McQueen and James Coburn as well as screenwriter Stirling Silliphant. In addition he refined his prior knowledge of wing chun and incorporated aspects of other fighting styles such as traditional boxing and Okinawan karate. He also developed his own unique style "Jeet Kune Do" (Way of the Intercepting Fist). Another film opportunity then came his way as he landed the small role of a stand over man named "Winslow Wong" who intimidates private eye James Garner in Marlowe. Wong pays a visit to Garner and proceeds to demolish the investigator's office with his fists and feet, finishing off with a spectacular high kick that shatters the light fixture. With this further exposure of his talents, Bruce then scored several guest appearances as a martial arts instructor to blind private eye James Franciscus on the TV series Longstreet.

With his minor success in Hollywood and money in his pocket, Bruce returned for a visit to Hong Kong and was approached by film producer Raymond Chow who had recently started "Golden Harvest" productions. Chow was keen to utilize Lee's strong popularity amongst young Chinese fans, and offered him the lead role in _Tang sha da xiong (1971)_ (A.K.A. "The Big Boss"). The film was directed by Wei Lo, shot in Thailand on a very low budget and in terrible living conditions for cast and crew. However, when it opened in Hong Kong the film was an enormous hit. Chow knew he had struck box office gold with Lee and quickly assembled another script entitled The Chinese Connection (A.K.A. "The Chinese Connection", A.K.A. "Fist of Fury"). The second film (with a slightly bigger budget) was again directed by Wei Lo and was set in Shanghai in the year 1900, with Lee returning to his school to find that his beloved master has been poisoned by the local Japanese karate school. Once again he uncovers the evil-doers and sets about seeking revenge on those responsible for murdering his teacher. The film features several superb fight sequences and, at the film's conclusion, Lee refuses to surrender to the Japanese law and seemingly leaps to his death in a hail of police bullets.

Once more Hong Kong streets were jammed with thousands of fervent Chinese movie fans who could not get enough of the fearless Bruce Lee, and his second film went on to break the box office records set by the first! Lee then set up his own production company, Concord Productions, and set about guiding his film career personally by writing, directing and acting in his next film, _Meng long guojiang (1972)_ (A.K.A. "Way of the Dragon", A.K.A. "Return of The Dragon"). A bigger budget meant better locations and opponents, with the new film set in Rome, Italy and additionally starring hapkido expert Ing-Sik Whang, karate legend Robert Wall and seven-time U.S. karate champion Chuck Norris. Bruce plays a seemingly simple country boy sent to assist at a cousin's restaurant in Rome and finds his cousins are being bullied by local thugs for protection.

By now Lee's remarkable success in East Asia had come to the attention of Hollywood film executives and a script was hastily written pitching him as a secret agent penetrating an island fortress. Warner Bros. financed the film and also insisted on B-movie tough guy John Saxon starring alongside Lee to give the film wider appeal. The film culminates with another show-stopping fight sequence between Lee and the key villain, Han, in a maze of mirrors. Shooting was completed in and around Hong Kong in early 1973 and in the subsequent weeks Bruce was involved in completing over dubs and looping for the final cut. Various reports from friends and coworkers cite that he was not feeling well during this period and on July twentieth 1973 he lay down at the apartment of actress Betty Ting Pei after taking a head-ache tablet and was later unable to be revived. A doctor was called and Lee was taken to hospital by ambulance and pronounced dead that evening. The official finding was death due to a cerebral edema, caused by a reaction to the head-ache tablet.

Fans world-wide were shattered that their virile idol had passed at such a young age, and nearly thirty thousand fans filed past his coffin in Hong Kong. A second, much smaller ceremony was held in Seattle, Washington and Bruce was laid to rest at Lake View Cemetary in Seattle with pall bearers including Steve McQueen, James Coburn and Dan Inosanto. Enter the Dragon was later released in the mainland United States, and was a huge hit with audiences there, which then prompted National General films to actively distribute his three prior movies to U.S. theatres... each was a box office smash.

Fans throughout the world were still hungry for more Bruce Lee films and thus remaining footage (completed before his death) of Lee fighting several opponents including Dan Inosanto, Hugh O'Brian and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was crafted into another film titled Game of Death. The film used a look-alike and shadowy camera work to be substituted for the real Lee in numerous scenes. The film is a poor addition to the line-up and is only saved by the final twenty minutes and the footage of the real Bruce Lee battling his way up the tower. Amazingly this same shoddy process was used to create Game of Death II (A.K.A. "Game of Death II"), with a look-alike and more stunt doubles interwoven with a few brief minutes of footage of the real Bruce Lee.

Tragically his son Brandon Lee, an actor and martial artist like his father, was killed in a freak accident on the set of The Crow.

Bruce Lee was not only an amazing athlete and martial artist but he possessed genuine superstar charisma and through a handful of films he left behind an indelible impression on the tapestry of modern cinema.

Burt Ward

Actor Burt Ward had to endure one of the toughest setbacks ever to befall a TV star once his camp-styled antics as the "Boy Wonder" superhero ended on the one-time hit series Batman. Irreparably typecast, he was out of commission for much of his "post-Robin" career with the cult star eventually becoming a frequent participant at TV nostalgia conventions. He was born Bert John Gervis, Jr, the oldest of three children. His father, Bert Sr. was the owner of a traveling ice show called "Rhapsody On Ice." By age two, young Bert was billed as the youngest professional ice skater and his name was even featured in the book Strange As It Seems, a predecessor to the popular Guinness Book of Records. Eventually Bert's family migrated to Los Angeles where his father sold real estate. Bright and athletically inclined, Bert Jr. was active on the high school track and field, wrestling, and golf teams. He was also a chess champion at school and took up karate.

Following graduation in 1963, Bert met Bonney Lindsey, whose father was the well-known musical conductor Mort Lindsey. Through Mr. Lindsey's contacts, Bert and Bonney apprenticed at the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope, Pennsylvania, where he worked behind the scenes building sets and assisting with props. It was enough to pique his interest and, after attending the University of California at Santa Barbara where he worked part time as a deejay at the local college station, he transferred to UCLA and became a motion picture and theater major, supplementing his income during that time in real estate.

After college, Bert ventured on with his work as a broker and actually made his first sale to producer Saul David who introduced the young hopeful to an agent. In 1965 ABC started its search for a "new face" to appear on an upcoming comic strip series. Bert lucked out and managed a screen test with Adam West for the role of Dick ("Robin") Grayson opposite West's caped crusader. Bert's compact build, slightly awkward sense of humor, and assured athletic skills (he was a brown belt in karate at the time) were instrumental in his winning the role. He adopted the last name of Ward for his moniker, which was his mother's last name, and changed the spelling of his first name to "Burt."

Without any professional acting experience at all, Burt was suddenly thrust into the limelight big time. Batman premiered in January of 1966 and caught on instantly. It became a ratings smash. The kitschy, tongue-in-cheek humor combined with the colorful sets, gimmicky props ("Batmobile") and heroes' catchy phrases (including Burt's "holy (whatever), Batman!") all added tremendously to the cartoon fun and triggered huge profits for ABC. Popular guest stars villains such as Frank Gorshin, Julie Newmar, Cesar Romero, Burgess Meredith, Vincent Price, Victor Buono and even Tallulah Bankhead joined in on the outrageousness. Faithful to Bob Kane's original comic strip, fans could not get enough of the Dynamic Duo or the show. Adam and Burt made frequent personal appearances and appeared everywhere in numerous magazine articles.

The sudden thrust of celebrity eventually took its toll on Burt's young marriage to Bonney and they divorced around the beginning of the show's second season. He then married lovely actress Kathy Kersh whom he met when she appeared as a guest on the show. This marriage too fell apart after only a couple of years. Kersh went on to marry actor Vince Edwards. An untried talent at the time he started the show, he made, as such, only $350 a week during the first season. He did not fare much better in the subsequent seasons ($450 for the second; $500 for the third). Moreover, by 1968 audiences lost interest and, after two-and-a-half years, his "fifteen minutes of fame" was over. Like a new dance craze, the novelty wore off and all the hoopla surrounding it disappeared. The show went into the ratings tank. Towards the end they tried adding a sexy Batgirl (lovely Yvonne Craig) to spice up the proceedings but it didn't help.

With the demise of the series, Burt had no prior acting credits and nothing sound to fall back on. Both he and Adam West, who once had a serious reputation as an actor, would pay dearly for the characters that turned them into overnight sensations. They did wind up providing the animated voices to their superheroes on Saturday morning cartoons. Burt put aside the acting business and used his smarts in other suitable ways. He used a bit of his savvy and organized fan clubs, seeing that all his fan mail was given responses. He also launched a fund-raising business to help schools and hospitals raise money. During the late 1980's, Burt created an early education program for children aged 3-8 that taught social values, good health and safety rules, and critical thinking skills. It was called the Early Bird Learning Program.

It was through this education program that Burt met fourth wife Tracy Posner. They married on July 15, 1990, and had daughter Melody Lane Ward the following year. He also has an older daughter, Lisa, from his first marriage. Together Burt and Tracy organized Great Dane Rescue which rescues and finds homes for this special breed. Unlike others who have suffered similar career fallouts, Burt has ventured on productively with his life. He also went on to make a game comeback of sorts in low-budget films in the late 80s with such dubious titles as Virgin High (with Tracy), Hot Under the Collar and Karate Raider leading the pack.

Will Estes

Will Estes returned to prime-time television with a starring role in the successful CBS drama Blue Bloods. Now entering it's 7th season, Will stars as NYPD police officer Jamie Reagan opposite Tom Selleck. Throughout his career Will Estes has amassed a diverse body of film and television work, challenging himself with each role. On the small screen, Estes received critical acclaim for his performance as JJ Pryor in American Dreams. His additional television credits include Law and Order: SVU, The Cleaner, In Plain Sight, The 11th Hour, and many others. Major motion picture credits include his role in the two-time Academy Award-winning WWII film U-571 and the final installment of Christopher Nolan's Batman franchise The Dark Knight Rises, portraying 'Officer Simon Jansen'. Highlights of Estes' independent film credits include the noir thriller Automotive, Line of Duty, See You In My Dreams with Marcia Gay Harden, and Magic Valley with Scott Glenn which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. His humanitarian efforts include advocating renewable energy, conservation of wild lands and humane treatment of animals.

Sean Pertwee

Sean Pertwee was born into a theatrical dynasty of actors. After training at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, Sean began his acting career with the Royal Shakespeare Company, most notably starring in Titus Andronicus directed by Deborah Warner.

After touring for three years, Sean continued his classical training by playing Julius Caesar for the BBC and Macbeth for Michael Bogdanov's production for C4 films. Since then, he has become instantly recognizable for both his film and television work.

On film, Sean began on the Joe Orton's biopic Prick Up Your Ears, then went on to appear in Paul W.S. Anderson's Shopping, playing opposite Jude Law. Followed by performances in Event Horizon, Soldier, Doomsday, Love, Honor and Obey, and the lead role in Neil Marshall's Dog Soldiers. Other notable film credits include Deadly Voyage; Wild Bill; Blue Juice, in which Sean played opposite Catherine Zeta-Jones and Ewan McGregor; and Formula 51 with Samuel L. Jackson and Robert Carlyle. Most recently, Sean played opposite Steve Coogan in Alan Partridge.

Sean's extensive TV work saw him recently play the iconic role of Lestrade in the CBS show Elementary with Jonny Lee Miller as Sherlock Holmes. He has also starred in The Musketeers, Agatha Christie's Poirot, the award-winning Luther, and had a recurring role in the hugely popular Cold Feet with 'James Nesbitt' (I)_. Sean's other TV credits include Skins, Bodyguards, Jo with 'Jean Reno', Chancer, The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Clarissa with Sean Bean, and Camelot with Joseph Fiennes and Eva Green.

Sean is set to appear as Alfred Pennyworth the unflappable butler, in the new Warner Bros. series Gotham, which follows the story behind Commissioner James Gordon's rise to prominence in Gotham City in the years before Batman's arrival. Sean is a popular voiceover artist and can frequently be heard voicing documentaries, animated films, commercials, TV series, and video games, including Fable, Killzone, and Assassin's Creed.

Cesar Romero

Tall, suave and sophisticated Cesar Romero actually had two claims to fame in Hollywood. To one generation, he was the distinguished Latin lover of numerous musicals and romantic comedies, and the rogue bandit The Cisco Kid in a string of low-budget westerns. However, to a younger generation weaned on television, Romero was better known as the white-faced, green-haired, cackling villain The Joker of the camp 1960s TV series Batman, and as a bumbling corporate villain in a spate of Walt Disney comedies, such as chasing a young Kurt Russell in the fun-packed The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes. Fans and critics alike agreed that Romero was a major talent who proved himself an enduring and versatile star in an overwhelming variety of roles in a career as an actor, dancer and comedian that lasted nearly 60 years.

Cesar Romero was born of Cuban parents in New York City in February 1907. He attended the Collegiate School and Riverdale Country School before working as a ballroom dancer. He first appeared on Broadway in the 1927 production of Lady Do, and then in the stage production of Strictly Dishonorable. His first film role was in The Shadow Laughs, after which he gave strong performances in The Devil Is a Woman and in the Shirley Temple favorite, Wee Willie Winkie.

Critics and fans generally agree that Romero's best performance was as the Spanish explorer Cortez in Captain from Castile. However, he also shone in the delightful Julia Misbehaves and several other breezy and lighthearted escapades. In 1953 he starred in the 39-part espionage TV serial Passport to Danger, which earned him a considerable income due to a canny profit-sharing arrangement. Although Romero became quite wealthy and had no need to work, he could not stay away from being in front of the cameras. He continued to appear in a broad variety of film roles, but surprised everyone in Hollywood by taking on the role of "The Joker" in the hugely successful TV series Batman. He refused to shave his trademark mustache for the role, and close observation shows how the white clown makeup went straight on over his much loved mustache! The appearances in Batman were actually only a small part of the enormous amount of work that Romero contributed to television. He guest-starred in dozens of shows, including Rawhide, 77 Sunset Strip, Zorro, Fantasy Island and Murder, She Wrote. However, it was The Joker for which his TV work was best remembered, and Romero often remarked that for many, many years after Batman ended, fans would stop him and ask him to chuckle and giggle away just like he did as The Joker. Romero always obliged, and both he and the fans just loved it!

With a new appeal to a younger fan base, Romero turned up in three highly popular Disney comedies: The Computer Wore Tennis Shoes, Now You See Him, Now You Don't and The Strongest Man in the World as corrupt but inept villain A.J. Arno. Throughout the remainder of the 1980s Romero remained busy, and even at 78 years of age the ladies still loved his charm, and he was cast as Jane Wyman's love interest in the top-rated prime-time soap opera Falcon Crest, playing Peter Stavros from 1985 to 1987.

Although Romero stopped acting in 1990, he remained busy, regularly hosting classic movie programs on cable television. A talented and much loved Hollywood icon, he passed away on New Year's Day 1994, at the age of 86.

Ian Ziering

Ian Ziering was born on March 30, 1964, and was raised in West Orange, New Jersey, a suburb of New York City. By the mid-1970s, young Ian was landing spots in national commercials at the age of 12, which led to roles in various soap operas and stage plays, most notably Guiding Light, the Broadway production of I Remember Mama and, in a national touring production of Peter Pan. In 1981 he made his feature film debut in Endless Love (as Brooke Shields' little brother) - a film that also marked the big-screen debuts of Tom Cruise and James Spader.

However, in 1990, Ziering landed the role that would change his life - "Steve Sanders" on the teen drama, Beverly Hills 90210. The show brought instant, worldwide fame to the cast. Ian was suddenly an international heartthrob and played the role for the show's entire ten-year run. During his years on 90210 he was also featured in various films and television shows, including Russell Crowe's No Way Back, What I Like About You and Melrose Place, to name a few.

Since 90210, Ziering has appeared on numerous television shows including CSI: NY, JAG and Fran Drescher's Happily Divorced. In addition, he has continued to be one of the most in-demand actors for various animated films and television shows including Spider-Man, Mighty Ducks, Batman Beyond and Biker Mice from Mars. In 2005, in a real change of pace from his normal acting roles, Ziering also appeared in the Tony Scott feature film thriller, Domino, with Keira Knightley. Other film credits include National Lampoon's The Legend of Awesomest Maximus, That's My Boy with Adam Sandler, An American Girl: McKenna Shoots for the Stars with Nia Vardalos, Snake and Mongoose, and, Christmas In Palm Springs.

In 2007, Ziering showed the world that he was a true triple threat when he signed on to the fourth season of the hit ABC series, Dancing with the Stars. A fan and judge favorite with his partner, two-time Mirror Ball Champion Cheryl Burke, the pair eventually danced their way into the show's semifinals. In addition to his ongoing acting roles and voiceover work, Ian is a much sought-after television host and, was most recently seen hosting HGTV's A-List Pets.

2013 proved to be a pivotal year for Ziering both professionally and personally. At the age of 49, Ian became a Las Vegas headliner when he starred as the celebrity guest host of the award-winning production of Chippendales at the Rio All-Suite Hotel and Casino. Taking on this new role, the actor hit the gym and dropped 30 pounds, transforming himself into a fit and muscled man, thrilling the sold-out audiences. His Chippendales engagement brought him a new wave of fans and international acclaim, thrusting him once again into the limelight. The engagement was such a huge success, establishing Ian as a major Las Vegas box-office draw, he was asked to return to the show in Summer 2014 for another sold-out run at the Rio with the world-famous brand.

However, it was during his final week with the Chippendales in 2013 that Ian's small-budget film Sharknado aired on the SyFy Channel and instantly became a social media and worldwide phenomenon. Garnering more than 5,000 tweets per minute during its initial broadcast - more than any other television show to date - Sharknado became an instant science fiction, cult classic and, even received a theatrical release in movie theatres around the world due to its popularity with fans.

The franchise exploded so much that in July 2014 Ian reprised his role as Fin Shepard in SyFy's Sharknado 2: The Second One, and the film went on to devour the world and become an even bigger pop culture phenomenon than the first. The record-setting sequel had nearly 4 million viewers in its first broadcast and went on to claim the title as the "most social movie on TV ever" by garnering one billion (that is NOT a typo) twitter impressions. At one point, Sharknado 2 held all top 10 trending topics in the United States with more mentions on Twitter than #MileyCyrus on the day of MTV's 2013 VMAs, and #kimye on Kim and Kanye's wedding day. Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! stormed the world in July 2015 and chomped its way to over 2 billion twitter impressions - doubling those of Sharknado 2. Generating more Twitter activity than every episode of the final season of Mad Men, every episode of last season's The Bachelor and Hillary Clinton's presidential announcement, Sharknado 3 trended #1 in the United States and #2 worldwide. The latest film in the hit franchise, Sharknado 4: The Fourth Awakens, debuts on July 31, 2016 on SyFy.

A true philanthropist, Ian used his brains, brawn (and his heart) when he competed on NBC's 7h season of the hit series, Celebrity Apprentice. Along with his other contestants, Ian endured challenging tasks that tested his ability to work with his colleagues while ultimately raising over $320,000 for the EB Medical Research Foundation (www.ebkids.org). Ian is proud to be the fourth highest celebrity fundraiser in the history of Celebrity Apprentice. Inspired by his entrepreneurial tasks during Celebrity Apprentice, Ian has created a new clothing line, Chainsaw Brands (ChainsawBrands.com), featuring classic American style athleisure and apparel. In keeping with his philanthropic nature, a portion of all proceeds from the sale of his signature line will benefit those less fortunate. In addition, in February 2016, Ian launched CelebrityHideaways.com, a luxury destination based website for the discerning traveler looking for unique experiences typically frequented by the rich and famous. His extensive travel over the last 30 years lends itself to revealing the less beaten path for site visitors to browse, get information, and book their perfect vacation.

And, it's not just his professional career that is soaring. Ian's personal life has seen some wonderful changes as well over the last few years. He and his wife, nurse Erin Ziering, welcomed their second daughter, Penna Mae in 2013. Their first daughter, Mia Loren, was born on the same day, two years earlier. The quintessential father and family man, Ian was named DaddyScrubs "Daddy of the Year 2013," an award which recognizes fathers who are extremely proactive in raising their children. In June 2016, Ian and his wife launched the family blog, AtHomeWithTheZierings.com, a creative resource for other families. Ian currently resides in Los Angeles with his wife and daughters. Follow Ian on Twitter and Instagram @IanZiering.

Cynthia Kaye McWilliams

Cynthia Kaye McWilliams was born in Berlin, Germany, grew up primarily in Kansas City, Kansas and graduated from the prestigious Theater School of DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois.

While in Chicago, Cynthia honed her skills with stage credits including the lead role in First Breeze of Summer, Lady Capulet in an adaptation of the classic, Romeo and Juliet and Vivian Baptiste in A Lesson Before Dying. Just out of college, Cynthia's first job on camera was working opposite Sandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves in Warner Brothers' The Lake House, followed by a recurring role on FOX's Prison Break. After that, she landed a lead role in Family Practice; a pilot created by the producers of Lost . Cynthia continued to work in Chicago racking up experience in independent films like Robert Townsend's Of Boys and Men and the romantic comedy, One Small Hitch. Cynthia then returned to television on another FOX series Chicago Code and soon flew from Chicago to Los Angeles for a dream job, playing sitcom wife to Damon Wayans in a CBS pilot. This would be her second cancelled pilot but still determined, she made her move to LA permanent. Only a few months later she would land her current role as a series regular on NAACP award winning comedy, The Real Husbands of Hollywood as Trina Shaw, entertainment lawyer to the stars, among them - the hilarious Kevin Hart. Last year she booked the leading role in the NBC drama pilot, Love is a Four Letter Word and has enjoyed guest and recurring roles on The Exes, Hart of Dixie, Survivors Remorse, The Odd Couple, Nashville as well as appearances in original web series Almost Home and Surviving, both produced by her fellow actress and friend Reagan Gomez. Cynthia thoroughly enjoys her voiceover career having voiced for Cartoon Network, the animated film, Bilal and several video games including HALO 5, Batman, Skylanders and more. Cynthia supports women & minorities creating their own content, is a believer in artist collaboration and avidly supports arts education.

Lee Meriwether

Today, sexy Lee Mereiwether is best remembered for her roles in a few science fiction/fantasy cult productions made between 1966 and 1969. Batman: The Movie, Star Trek, The Time Tunnel and Land Of The Giants.

Firstly Batman: The Movie, in this she played both evil Catwoman and not-so-evil Kitka who has a romance with Bruce Wayne (Adam West).

Then came 30 episodes of Irwin Allen's Time Tunnel series, in this she played a scientist named Ann MacGregor, where she mostly performed with Whit Bissell (General Kirk), both attempting to help two time travelers who were lost in time. In one episode, The Kidnappers, Ann was taken away from her normal setting and transported into the distant future.

However, Mereiwether once reported that she spent a lot of the series acting to a screen in the Time Tunnel complex, a screen that was meant to feature the two time travelers, but in reality featured nothing at all. So she was reacting to nothing a lot of the time.

Then came Star Trek episode, That Which Survives, where she played Losira, an evil being who stalks the Enterprise crew and attempts to kill them.

And finally she was back with Irwin Allen again with the Land Of The Giants episode, Rescue. In this she played the concerned "giant" mother of kids who were trapped underground and needed to be rescued by the earth "little people".

Mereiwether is still working in television to this day.

Kevin Michael Richardson

Well-known, king-sized actor and voice artist Kevin Michael Richardson was born in Bronx, New York. He is, perhaps, mostly recognizable for his deep voice, which he uses in many of his works.

Richardson is a classically trained actor. He first gained recognition as one of only eight U.S. high school students selected for the National Foundation for the Arts' "Arts '82" program, later he earned a scholarship to Syracuse University.

Kevin is well-known by various voice works, mostly villainous. He lent his voice to based-upon video game film Mortal Kombat (1995) as Goro, he was also in Matrix Revolutions (2003) as Deus Ex Machina, and made a brief appearance in Clerks II (2006) as a police officer. To mention that he did a brief additional voices for mega hit Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009).

He did voice in many animated films and TV series, such as "The Mask - The Animated Series" (1995), "The New Batman Adventures" (1997), "Pokemon" (1998), "Powerpuff Girls" (1998), "Voltron: The Third Dimension" (1998), "Family Guy", Lilo & Stitch (2002), as well as "Lilo & Stitch" TV series, "Codename Kids Next Door" (2002), Batman VS Dracula (2005) (V), where he voiced Joker, "Mummy The Animated Series" (2003), TMNT (2007) as General Aguila, "Transformers Animated" (2007) as Omega Supreme and Batman: Gotham Knight (2008), as Lucius Fox.

He also did voices in such video games as Halo 2 (Tartarus), Kingdom Hearts (Sebastian) and others. He lives in Los Angeles and likes to work in Manhattan.

Danny Elfman

As Danny Elfman was growing up in the Los Angeles area, he was largely unaware of his talent for composing. It wasn't until the early 1970s that Danny and his older brother Richard Elfman started a musical troupe while in Paris; the group "Mystic Knights of Oingo-Boingo" was created for Richard's directorial debut, Forbidden Zone (now considered a cult classic by Elfman fans). The group's name went through many incarnations over the years, beginning with "The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo" and eventually just Oingo Boingo. While continuing to compose eclectic, intelligent rock music for his L.A.-based band (some of which had been used in various film soundtracks, e.g. Weird Science), Danny formed a friendship with young director Tim Burton, who was then a fan of Oingo Boingo. Danny went on to score the soundtrack of Pee-wee's Big Adventure, Danny's first orchestral film score. The Elfman-Burton partnership continued (most notably through the hugely-successful "Batman" flicks) and opened doors of opportunity for Danny, who has been referred to as "Hollywood's hottest film composer".

Vicki Lewis

Starred on Broadway as Velma Kelly in "Chicago", The Tony nominated "Damn Yankees", "The Crucible", performed as a soloist with the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, "Pal Joey" (with Peter Gallagher and Patti Lupone.) Her voice can be heard in scores of animated television and films, most notably, "Finding Nemo", "Wonder Woman", Justice League", "Ben 10", "Phineas and Ferb", "Alpha And Omega",and the upcoming "Batman". She starred as Beth in NBC's "Newsradio" and "Three Sisters"( also for NBC). She has appeared in countless television and film roles most notably "The Ugly Truth", "Mousehunt", "Pushing Tin", "Breakfast Of Champions", "Godzilla", "I'll Do Anything", "Curb Your Enthusiasm", "The Middle", "Grey's Anatomy", "Dirt", "Caroline In The City", "Murphy Brown", "The Norm Show", "Grace Under Fire", "Home Improvement". Her solo album "East Of Midnight" was released in 2010.

Brett Ratner

Brett Ratner is one of Hollywood's most successful filmmakers. His diverse films resonate with audiences worldwide and, as director, his films have grossed over $2 billion at the global box office. Brett began his career directing music videos before making his feature directorial debut at 26 years old with the action comedy hit Money Talks. He followed with the blockbuster Rush Hour and its successful sequels. Brett also directed The Family Man, Red Dragon, After the Sunset, X-Men: The Last Stand, Tower Heist and Hercules.

Ratner has also enjoyed critical acclaim and box office success as a producer. He has served as an executive producer on the Golden Globe and Oscar winning The Revenant, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Black Mass, starring Johnny Depp; and as a producer on Truth, starring Robert Redford and Cate Blanchett; I Saw the Light, starring Tom Hiddleston and Elizabeth Olsen; and the upcoming film Rules Don't Apply, written, directed and produced by Warren Beatty. His other produced films include the smash hit comedy Horrible Bosses and its sequel, and the re-imagined Snow White tale Mirror Mirror.

His additional producing credits include the documentaries Author: The JT LeRoy Story, Catfish, the Emmy-nominated Woody Allen - A Documentary, Helmut by June, I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale, Chuck Norris vs. Communism, the 5-time Emmy nominated and Peabody Award winning Night Will Fall, Bright Lights and National Geographic's upcoming Untitled Leonardo DiCaprio Environmental Documentary, directed, produced by and starring Leonardo DiCaprio. He also executive produced and directed the Golden Globe-nominated FOX series Prison Break, and executive produced the television series Rush Hour, based on his hit films.

Brett, along with his business partner James Packer, formed RatPac Entertainment, a film finance production and media company, in 2013. RatPac has a first-look deal with Warner Bros. and joined with Dune Capital to co-finance over 75 films including Gravity, The Lego Movie, American Sniper, and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. RatPac Entertainment also co-financed The Revenant and Birdman with New Regency. Internationally, Warner Bros. and RatPac have formed a joint venture content fund with China's Shanghai Media Group to finance local Chinese content. In partnership with New Regency, RatPac also finances the development and production of Brad Pitt's Plan B Entertainment.

Since inception, RatPac Entertainment has co-financed 52 theatrically released motion pictures exceeding $9.3 billion in worldwide box office receipts. RatPac's co-financed films have been nominated for 51 Academy Awards, 20 Golden Globes and 39 BAFTAs and have won 21 Academy Awards, 7 Golden Globes and 17 BAFTAs.

Brett is a Board of Trustees member of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and Museum of Tolerance. He sits on the boards of Chrysalis, Best Buddies and Do Something, while serving on the Dean's Council of the NYU Tisch School of the Arts and on the Board of Directors at Tel Aviv University's School of Film and Television. In 2017, he will receive a coveted star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Travis Willingham

Hailing from Texas and an athletic background, Travis Willingham graduated from Texas Christian University's theatre program in 2003. No stranger to the stage or screen, Travis was surprised to develop a new talent in voice-over. A fan of the industry for decades, his booming voice can be recognized in over 150 video game franchises and animation titles.

Beginning his career in Dallas, he worked on many popular anime titles developed for American markets. After moving to Los Angeles, he found himself working on such titles as Marvel's Super Hero Squad Show playing The Incredible Hulk and Human Torch. A self-acknowledged comic geek himself, Travis has continued to work with Marvel Animation by maintaining the role of Thor in Marvel's Avengers Assemble, Ultimate Spider-Man, and Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H.

Other credits include Superman in Lego Batman The Movie: DC Super Heroes Unite, Phineas and Ferb, The Legend of Korra, Fish Hooks, Knuckles in Sonic The Hedgehog, and many more.

2013 also ushered in Travis as Disney's newest King, as he plays King Roland II in Disney Jr's new hit show, Sofia The First.

Coming from a proud family of gamers, his video game career is also growing. And with demand for motion capture in newer titles quickly on the rise, Travis is thankful for his sports and stunts background. After performing mocap for the multitude of Frost Giants in the theatrical release of Thor in 2011, his VO and mocap work in 2012 included blockbuster VG titles Halo 4, Skylanders Giants, Call of Duty: Black Ops II, Resident Evil 6, Transformers: Fall of Cybertron, and Grand Theft Auto V.

2013-14 offers some exciting new titles for Travis as he appears in the PS4 launch title Knack, Lego Marvel Super Heroes, and the February 2014 release of Infamous: Second Son as Reggie Rowe.

Hynden Walch

Hynden Walch was born on February 1, 1971 in Davenport, Iowa. She is an actress and writer known primarily for her work in Adventure Time, Teen Titans, Groundhog Day, and Batman Assault on Arkham. She started her professional acting career on stage at age 11. At 16 she attended the North Carolina School of the Arts, majoring in voice. As a high school senior, she was awarded as a Presidential Scholar in the Arts in drama. Hynden won the Outer Critics Circle Award for her performance as Little Voice in The Rise and Fall of Little Voice on Broadway. In 2005 she graduated summa cum laude from UCLA with a B.A. in American Literature and founded the Hillside Produce Cooperative, a free exchange of local, organically grown food, for which she was named runner up Citizen Entrepreneur of the Year by Global Green USA. Hynden has been married to Sean McDermott since 1999.

Prince

Prince Rogers Nelson was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Mattie Shaw, a jazz singer and social worker, and John L. Nelson, a lyricist and pianist. His father's stage name was "Prince Rogers". His parents were both from African-American families from Louisiana. They separated during his youth, which lead him to move back and forth. Prince had a troubled relationship with his step-father which lead him to run away from home. Prince was adopted by a family called the Andersons. Prince soon after became friends with the Anderson's son, Andre Anderson (Cymone) together along with Charles Smith they joined a band called Grand Central. The band later renamed themselves Champagne and were a fairly successful live band, however soon diminished.

Prince at the age of eighteen started working on high-quality demo tracks with Chris Moon. With these demo tracks Prince eventually ended up signing a recording contract with Warner Brothers Records and was the youngest producer associated with the label. Prince made his debut on the record label with his 1978 album, For You. It wasn't a strong successful album, however it was fair for a beginning artist and ranked 163 on the U.S. Pop Charts. Prince's next releases would tend to do much better on the charts with his singles, "Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?" and I Wanna Be Your Lover in 1979. This would start to introduce Prince as a person who presented sexually explicit material into the music industry. However Prince didn't begin to attract mainstream artists until he release his single, 1999. This single began to be noticed by M.T.V. viewers and this would make him a part of the main-stream music media. Prince released two more singles called Little Red Corvette and Delirious. The album featured Prince's new band, The Revolution. In 1984 Prince would release what would be seen as an admired and profound masterpiece the feature film/sound-track album, Purple Rain in 1984. Prince's father contributed to this album, by cowriting the chord sequence for a couple of his songs. Prince continued to give cowriting credit to his father on several other albums, as his famous chord sequence would be used in several of Prince's singles and albums.

A lot of Prince's songs did not agree with listeners and one of his songs, Darling Nikki prompted a group of people to start a censorship organization called, Parents Music Resource Center (P.M.R.C.) as the track implemented grinding ludicrous acts such as masturbating, which stunned listeners. Prince however continued to release various other singles with the same platform his memorable releases being, Around The World In A Day, Parade, Love Sexy, and Batman.

Prince released a sequel to Purple Rain in 1990 called Graffiti Bridge, a soundtrack album accompanied this movie entitled, Graffiti Bridge. The film did terrible in box-office and was nominated for several Razzie awards. Many people saw the sound-track album, as the high point of the film.

In 1991, Prince assembled a new band called, The New Power Generation with this band he would release singles such as Diamond And Pearls, Cream, and Gett Off. Prince eventually changed his stage name from Prince to a symbol, which lead people to call him, "The Artist Formerly Known As Prince". Prince soon took back his old stage name.

In the 1990s, Prince continued to release singles such as Came, The Gold Experience, Chaos And Disorder, and Emancipation. With the rise of the new millennium, Prince released material such as a religious album called The Rainbow Children,One Nite Alone,The Chocolate Invasion,The Slaughter House, and had a collaboration with Stevie Wonder on Stevie's single called, What The Fuss in 2005.

Prince died on April 21, 2016 in Chanhassen, Minnesota, at his Paisley Park recording studio complex. He was 57.

Prince will be remembered as a musician and artist who inspired millions through his music, and set an inspirational platform which others still abide by.

Karen David

From India to Canada, England to America, Karen David has crisscrossed the world. Born in Shillong, India in the foothills of the Himalayas, Karen was raised in Toronto and came of age in the UK. At age 17, she won a scholarship to Berklee College of Music in Boston, where she studied jazz and gospel. It was here she discovered a flair for songwriting and a love for drama, which led her to study at the Guildford School of Acting in London. It wasn't long after finishing drama school that she landed her first acting role in the original stage cast of the London West End musical "Mamma Mia!"

Her talent as a singer and all-around performer led her to sign a record deal with BMG Europe, generating the 2003 single "It's Me (You're Talking To)," which became a Top Ten hit in Austria, Germany and Switzerland as well as BMG's fourth highest airplay hit for a debut artist. Soon after, she was discovered by composer A.R. Rahman ("Slumdog Millionaire") who, impressed by her talents, invited David to help develop the soundtrack for the Bollywood-themed musical "Bombay Dreams" alongside Andrew Lloyd Webber and Don Black. They subsequently created the theme tune for the British drama "Provoked," in which David had a supporting role.

Unquestionably, it is her acting work in television that has earned her the majority of her die hard fans in the UK and America. In the BBC's BAFTA-nominated "Waterloo Road," she played Francesca Montoya, a teacher who fell in love with a student. The storyline generated plenty of controversy, and more and more admirers fell for her compelling performance, with the series generating over nine million viewers per episode.

Going on to co-star for two seasons on the hugely popular BBC comedy series "Pixelface," produced by comedian Graham Norton's BAFTA award-winning company So Television, Karen David has begun to reap success on the other side of the pond: in MTV's "Top Buzzer" as a co-lead, in the action/thriller "Strike Back" for Cinemax, and in guest roles in the Fox drama "Touch" and the ABC crime drama "Castle."

Fully revealing her comedy chops, Karen David plays Princess Isabella, who seeks out and engages a once-gallant prince in order to save her people from an evil king in the ABC comedy extravaganza "Galavant," from Dan Fogelman ("Cars," "Tangled," "Crazy, Stupid, Love"), with songs by Oscar-winning composer Alan Menken.

Her film career began with a supporting co-lead role opposite, James McAvoy, as a member of an R&B band in the UK cult hit "Bollywood Queen," leading to a supporting role in "Batman Begins," a co-leading role in "The Scorpion King: Rise of a Warrior," and notable performances in the Vince Vaughn comedy "Couples Retreat" and in the Sigourney Weaver and Robert De Niro drama "Red Lights." More recently, she portrayed a tough FBI agent in the blockbuster "Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit" and just wrapped the independent comedy "The Tiger Hunter," alongside Danny Pudi, Kevin Pollak, Sam Page and Jon Heder.

On the musical front, she is continually refining her passion for writing and recording "feel-good, indie-girl pop with a twist." In the wake of her hit 2003 single "It's Me (You're Talking To)," she released her first two EPs, "The Live Sessions" EP (2008) and "Magic Carpet Ride" (2009), followed by the 2010 single "Hypnotize" and three mixes. She shepherded the 2013 EP "Dust to Stars," collaborating with such established songwriter/producers as Stefan Skarbek, Carl Ryden and Boots Ottestad as well as Adam Argyle & Martin Brammer.

Vinzenz Kiefer

Vinzenz was born in 1979 in Weilburg/Lahn. He grew up in a small village between two farms. He loved chasing chickens as well as building cabins in the woods and playing with fire. His parents' video collection was also an early passion of his (later on he took care of it completely and since then, he has expanded it significantly). Movies like "King of Kings", "Zorro", "Three Musketeers", and "Robin Hood" were key experiences while he was a boy, as well as films about pirates. Later on titles like "Batman" and "Legend" would find his attention, and Vinzenz could be seen quite often in a Batman costume - or running around, painting big Zs on front doors. After trying to invent a time machine several times or to find diamonds in the forests or to dig a hole to the center of the earth (and failing each time, of course) he finally turned to every-day life and meeting people and finding friends. Learning by doing became to be one of his favorite principles, and he used it to get familiar with riding a motor scooter, smoking or finding his rank within the gang and impressing the girls. One day while visiting the Cologne film studios Vinzenz was crowded by a bunch of girls pleading for his autograph. Some people in a production studio watched this scene and invited him for an interview, after which he was offered a part in a TV series. Vinzenz declined because he did not feel ready to leave his home and his friends. But the production studio kept on asking him, and so, after finishing school, Vinzenz finally agreed to take this chance.

Alec Rayme

Born Ali Alherimi in Akron, Ohio, on December 20th, 1978, Alec Rayme was raised mostly in Florida. He was very athletic spending most of his younger days playing sports. After high school he went on to play college football at USM and then Pro Arena football in Florida. After a short lived football career he hit the road in search of something new. He got approached by an agent while working for his fathers store, with nothing to lose he gave it a shot. The first audition he was sent on he booked as Batman in the Batman Stunt Spectacular at Six Flags New Orleans. He had always been into anything that had to do with art, but this very much got his foot into the entertainment industry. From there he fell into stunts and would usually book stunt acting roles. After almost 10 years of stunts he decided that it was enough for him and started to focus mainly on acting. After booking a couple big roles he knew he had made the right decision. He now acts full time as well as owns a food truck called "The Holy Grill" He has never been married and has no children. He hopes to continue to act and also will be making his directing debut in 2014. Recent films "Left Behind" and "Lets Be Cops" both will be released in 2014.

Efrem Zimbalist Jr.

It's hardly surprising that the son of renowned Russian-born concert violinist Efrem Zimbalist Sr. (1889-1985) and Romanian-born opera singer Alma Gluck (1884-1938) would desire a performing career of some kind. Born in New York City on November 30, 1918, surrounded by people of wealth and privilege throughout his childhood, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. received a boarding school education. Acting in school plays, he later trained briefly at the Yale School of Drama but didn't apply himself enough and quit. As an NBC network radio page, he auditioned when he could and found minor TV and stock theatre parts while joining up with the Neighborhood Playhouse.

Following WWII war service with the Army infantry in which he was awarded the Purple Heart after being wounded, a director and friend of the family, Garson Kanin, gave the aspiring actor his first professional role in his Broadway production of "The Rugged Path" (1945) which starred Spencer Tracy. With his dark, friendly, clean-scrubbed good looks and a deep, rich voice that could cut butter, Zimbalist found little trouble finding work. He continued with the American Repertory Theatre performing in such classics as "Henry VIII" and "Androcles and the Lion" while appearing opposite the legendary Eva Le Gallienne in "Hedda Gabler".

Zimbalist then tried his hand as a stage producer, successfully bringing opera to Broadway audiences for the first time with memorable presentations of "The Medium" and "The Telephone". As producer of Gian Carlo Menotti's "The Consul", he won the New York Drama Critic's Award and the Pulitzer Prize for best musical in 1950. An auspicious film debut opposite Edward G. Robinson in House of Strangers brought little career momentum due to the untimely death of his wife Emily (a onetime actress who appeared with him in "Hedda Gabler" and bore him two children, Nancy and Efrem III) to cancer in 1950. Making an abrupt decision to abandon acting, he served as assistant director/researcher at the Curtis School of Music for his father and buried himself with studies and music composition.

In 1954, Efrem returned to acting and copped a daytime television soap lead (Concerning Miss Marlowe). It was famed director Joshua Logan who proved instrumental in helping Zimbalist secure a Warner Bros. contract. Despite forthright second leads in decent films such as Band of Angels with Clark Gable and Yvonne De Carlo; Too Much, Too Soon starring Dorothy Malone and Errol Flynn; Home Before Dark with Jean Simmons and Rhonda Fleming; The Crowded Sky with Dana Andrews, Rhonda Fleming, Troy Donahue and Anne Francis; A Fever in the Blood opposite Angie Dickinson and (his best) Wait Until Dark with Audrey Hepburn, it was television that made the better use of his refined, unshowy acting style. His roles as smooth private investigator Stu Bailey on 77 Sunset Strip and dogged inspector Lewis Erskine on The F.B.I. would be his ultimate claims to fame.

A perfect gentleman on and off camera, Zimbalist's severest critics tend to deem his performances bland and undernourished. Managing to override such criticisms, he maintained a sturdy career for nearly six decades. In 1991, he made fun of his all-serious reputation and pulled off a Leslie Nielsen-like role in the comedy parody Hot Shots!. In addition to theater projects over the years, he has made fine use of his mellifluous baritone performing narrations and cartoon voiceovers, including that of Alfred the butler on a "Batman" animated series.

In 2003, he completed his memoirs, entitled "My Dinner of Herbs". The father of three, grandfather of four and great-grandfather of three, he settled in Santa Barbara and later in Solvang, California with longtime second wife Stephanie until her death in 2007 of cancer. Their daughter, also named Stephanie (Stephanie Zimbalist), is the well-known actress who appeared with Pierce Brosnan in the Remington Steele television series, in which Zimbalist had a recurring role. He and his daughter also appeared on stage together in his later years, their first being "The Night of the Iguana". His eldest daughter Nancy died in 2012.

Zimbalist died peacefully at his Solvang home of natural causes at the age of 95 on May 2, 2014.

Jonny Rees

Jonny Rees stars in the western "Forsaken" as "Tom Watson" alongside Demi Moore and Donald and Kiefer Sutherland in theaters next summer. On the big screen Jonny is best known for his portrayal of "Lieutenant Commander Groves" in the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movies as well as starring in J.J. Abrams "Star Trek," as "Chief Engineer Olsen," the original chief engineer of the Star ship Enterprise.

In 20145 Jonny formed a production company '"Monkey Toes." The shingle's first project was the Sky television drama "Marked," produced, written and directed by Jonny and starring Kiefer Sutherland and Stephen Fry, to great critical acclaim. He is set to direct the Michael Douglas movie, "Franklin Square" in the new year.

Jonny joined the cast of 'Hawaii Five-0' in season five to play Thomas Farrow in a major recurring arc, was a regular on the Fox drama "Touch" as "Trevor Wilcox," and played the villainous "Michael Amador" opposite Kiefer Sutherland in the 3rd season of the hit series "24." He also co-starred opposite Angelina Jolie in "Beowulf," with Brad Pitt in "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," and alongside Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in 'Titanic.'

He is the voice of MZingo in the new "Lion King" series "The Lion Guard" as well as the voice of Valen Rudor in the Disney animated series "Star Wars Rebels." Jonny's television credits include: "Dexter," "The X-Files," "The Riches," "Bones," "Alcatraz," "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine," "The Closer," "CSI," "Nip/Tuck," "Perception," "Knight Rider," and "Trust Me" to name a few.

Voice-over work includes multiple characters on "Tom and Jerry," "Star Wars: The Clone Wars," "Batman: The Brave & the Bold," "Sophia the First," "Star Versus the Forces of Evil," "Tron: Uprising," "The Mummy," "What's New, Scooby-Doo?", "The Boondocks," "Ben 10," "Annoying Orange," "Phineas and Ferb," "Teen Titans," and the animated feature films "Garfield 2" as "Nigel," and "Cars 2," as "Sir Nigel Gearsley."

Jonny has over 170 video-game credits to his name including the iconic series of: "Call of Duty," "God of War," "Diablo," "Uncharted," "Dragon Age," "Star Trek," "Cars," "Lord of the Rings," "X-Men," and "Medal of Honor," to name a few. He is also the voice of Rocket Raccoon for the "Guardians of the Galaxy" video games and animated show. His West End theatre credits include the role of "Rusty" in the original cast of Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber's New "Starlight Express," directed by Trevor Nunn; the alternate Chris in the original cast of "Miss. Saigon," directed by Nicholas Hytner and the role of "Fat Sam" in "Bugsy Malone," directed by Mickey Dolenz of Monkees fame.

Jonny has performed for H.R.H Queen Elizabeth II at Saint Paul's Cathedral as well as 2 Royal Command Performances and his recordings can be heard extensively throughout Europe where he has achieved 3 Top 20 singles.

Jonny's children are proudest of the fact that he is the voice of the Skylander's character "Jet-Vac."

Peter Ustinov

Peter Ustinov was a two-time Academy Award-winning film actor, a director, writer, journalist and raconteur. He wrote and directed many acclaimed stage plays and led numerous international theatrical productions.

He was born Peter Alexander Freiherr von Ustinov on April 16, 1921, in Swiss Cottage, London, England, the son of Nadezhda Leontievna (Benois) and Iona von Ustinov. His father was of one quarter Polish Jewish, one half Russian, one eighth African Ethiopian, and one eighth German, descent, while his mother was of one half Russian, one quarter Italian, one eighth French, and one eighth German, ancestry. Ustinov had ancestral connections to Russian nobility, as well as to the Ethiopian Royal Family. His father, also known as "Klop", was a pilot in the German Air Force during World War I. In 1919, Peter's father joined his own mother and sister in St. Petersburg, Russia. There he met Peter's mother, artist Nadia Benois, who worked for the Imperial Mariinsky Ballet and Opera House in St. Petersburg. In 1920, in a modest and discrete ceremony at a Russian-German Church in St. Petersburg, Ustinov's father married Nadia. Later, when she was seven months pregnant with Peter, the couple emigrated from Russia, in 1921, in the aftermath of the Communist Revolution.

Young Peter was brought up in a multi-lingual family--he was fluent in Russian, French, Italian and German, and also was a native English speaker. He attended Westminster College in 1934-37, took the drama and acting class under Michel St. Denis at the London Theatre Studio, 1937-39, and made his stage debut in 1938 in a theatre in Surrey. In 1939 he made his London stage debut in a revue sketch, then had regular performances with Aylesbury Repertory Company. In 1940 he made his film debut in Hullo, Fame!.

From 1942-46 Ustinov served as a private soldier with the British Army's Royal Sussex Regiment. He was batman for David Niven and the two became lifelong friends. Ustinov spent most of his service working with the Army Cinema Unit, where he was involved in making recruitment films, wrote plays and appeared in three films as an actor. At that time he wrote and directed The Way Ahead (aka "The Immortal Battalion").

Ustinov had a stellar film career as actor, director and writer, appearing in more than 100 film and television productions. He was awarded two Oscars for Best Supporting Actor--one for his role in Spartacus and one for his role in Topkapi--and received two more Oscar nominations as an actor and writer. His career slowed down a bit in the 1970s, but he made a comeback as Hercule Poirot in Death on the Nile by director John Guillermin. In the 1980s Ustinov reprized the Poirot role in several subsequent television movies and theatrical films, such as Evil Under the Sun and Appointment with Death. Later he appeared as a sympathetic doctor in the disease thriller Lorenzo's Oil.

Ustinov's effortless style and his expertise in dialectic and physical comedy made him a regular guest of talk shows and late night comedians. His witty and multi-dimensional humor was legendary, and he later published a collection of his jokes and quotations, summarizing his wide popularity as a raconteur. He was also an internationally acclaimed TV journalist. Ustinov covered over 100,000 miles and visited more than 30 Russian cities during the making of his well-received BBC television series Russia.

In his autobiographical books, such as "Dear Me" (1977) and "My Russia" (1996), Ustinov revealed a wealth of thoughtful and deep observations about how his life and career was formed by his rich multi-cultural and multi-ethnic background. He wrote and directed numerous stage plays, having success presenting his plays in several countries. His autobiographical play "Photo Finish" was staged in New York, London and St. Petersburg, Russia, where Ustinov directed the acclaimed production starring Elena Solovey and Petr Shelokhonov.

Outside of his acting and writing professions, Ustinov served as a Goodwill ambassador for UNICEF and president of WFM, a global citizens movement. He was knighted Sir Peter Ustinov in 1990. From 1971 to his death in 2004, Ustinov lived in a château in the village of Bursins, Vaud, Switzerland, He died of heart failure on March 28, 2004, in a clinic in Genolier, Vaud, Switzerland. His funeral service was held at Geneva's historic cathedral of St. Pierre, and he was laid to rest in the village cemetery of Bursins, Switzerland. He was survived by three daughters, Tamara, Pavla, and Andrea, and son, Igor Ustinov.

"I am an international citizen conceived in Russia, born in England, working in Hollywood, living in Switzerland, and touring the World" said Peter Ustinov.

Vincent Martella

Vincent Michael Martella was born in Rochester, New York, to Donna and Michael Martella, who owns a pizza chain. He was raised in Florida, and is of Italian descent.

Martella, responsible for breathing life into the animated character Phineas in the hit Disney Channel television show Phineas and Ferb, is no stranger to the entertainment industry. Jumpstarting his passion for performing and entertaining others through dance at age three, Vincent delivered his first live performance in The Nutcracker. Soon after, Martella was performing in school plays, appearing in local and National commercial spots, and training in acting, piano, and vocals. By age seven, Martella was already a big commodity in the Central Florida commercial market, working both print and national commercials.

During Martella's first trip to Los Angeles, he landed a guest spot on Fox's Cracking Up and Stacked, as well as a recurring role on Nickelodeon's Ned's Declassified, where he developed his own character for the role of "Scoop." The following summer, Vincent was cast in his first film role, acting opposite Rob Schneider in Deuce Bigelow: European Gigolo. In 2005, Martella landed one of his most notable roles as "Greg Wuliger" in the People's Choice and Golden Globe nominated comedy sitcom, Everybody Hates Chris, based loosely on comedian Chris Rock's childhood. During his four-year time with the show, Martella also had a role in the hit Universal Pictures film, Role Models, opposite Seann William Scott and Paul Rudd. Despite being a lead on Everybody Hates Chris, Martella was able to land another huge opportunity, being cast as "Phineas" in the hit animated Disney series, Phineas and Ferb. During his seven years voicing the main character, Martella also lent his vocals to all related Phineas and Ferb projects, Final Fantasy XIII, Batman video games and appeared in the television shows, R.L. Stine's The Haunting Hour and The Mentalist.

Martella can most recently be found in the recurring role of "Patrick" in AMC's critically acclaimed series, The Walking Dead. He also can be found in the films McFarland, opposite Kevin Costner and Maria Bello and Clinger, in post-production. With impressive roles and extremely popular credits on his resume, it is clear that Martella's past, present, and future in the entertainment business is bright. Martella splits his time between residing in both Los Angeles and Florida.

Frank Miller

Frank Miller was born in Olney, Maryland, to a nurse mother and a carpenter and electrician father, and was raised in Montpelier, Vermont. He is of Irish descent. Miller was a big comics writer/artist in the '70s and '80s. He wrote and penciled the Marvel series "Daredevil" for a long time. His friend, Klaus Janson, inked. He also wrote two spinoffs about the character "Electra" and did a miniseries about the "X-Men" character "Wolverine". His hit miniseries "Ronin" was published by DC in the mid-eighties. His greatest success came with DC's character "Batman". In 1980, he wrote the acclaimed "Batman" story "Wanted - Santa Claus - Dead or Alive!" for DC Comics. In 1986, his most notable comic-book work, the groundbreaking "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns", an alternate history story about Batman in a grim future, was published by DC. Miller wrote and penciled. In 1988, he wrote the acclaimed "Batman: Year One", about Batman's first year on the job, for DC. In 1996, he wrote "Spawn versus Batman", a one-shot issue published by DC and Image Comics. He wrote the major motion pictures RoboCop 2 and RoboCop 3 and did the "Robocop" comic series for a little while.

Miller directed The Spirit and co-directed Sin City and Frank Miller's Sin City: A Dame to Kill For (2014)_.

Geoff Johns

Geoff Johns is an American comic book and television writer, film and television producer.

He is the Chief Creative Officer at DC Comics, a position he has served in since 2010. His most notable work in different media has used the DC Comics characters Green Lantern, Aquaman, The Flash and Superman.

In 2006, Johns co-wrote the story for the Justice League Unlimited episode "Ancient History", which starred Hawkman, Hawkgirl, Vixen, Shadow Thief and the Green Lantern John Stewart.

Johns served as a co-producer and creative consultant for the 2011 Green Lantern film directed by Martin Campbell and starring Ryan Reynolds.

He is an executive producer on Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, directed by Zack Snyder and starring Henry Cavill and Ben Affleck.

As of mid-2015, Johns and Ben Affleck are co-writing the screenplay for a standalone Batman film.

Brandon Spink

Brandon Spink is quickly making a name for himself with buzz-worthy roles in television and film. At the age of seven, he found his passion of performing while starring in local theater productions. He is taking 2016 by storm with much anticipated projects releasing.

Brandon will be seen on the big screen as Billy in Miracles from Heaven co-starring Jennifer Garner and Queen Latifah; the incredible true story based on author, Christy Beam's memoir.

Next up, Brandon will take on the role of young Bruce Wayne in Warner Bros. star studded film Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, directed by Zach Snyder.

Later this spring, he is set to co-star in Open Road Film's Mother's Day, playing Jennifer Aniston and Timothy Olyphant's son, Peter. The romantic comedy is by acclaimed director Garry Marshall.

In addition to the big screen, Brandon will recur as Petey in NBC's upcoming one-hour drama Game of Silence.

During his down time, he plays on his hometown all-star baseball team and recently started learning guitar. He resides in Marietta, GA with his parents and two younger brothers.

Pat Hingle

Pat Hingle (real name: Martin Patterson Hingle) was born in Miami, Florida, the son of a building contractor. His parents divorced when Hingle was still in his infancy (he never knew his father) and his mother supported the family by teaching school in Denver. She then began to travel (with her son in tow) in search of more lucrative work; by age 13 Hingle had lived in a dozen cities. The future Tony Award nominee made his "acting debut" in the third grade, playing a carrot in a school play ("At that time it didn't seem like much of a way to make a living!", he recalled). Hingle attended high school in Texas and in 1941 entered the University of Texas, majoring in advertising. After serving in the Navy during WW II, he went back to the university and got involved with the drama department as a way to meet girls. With his wife Alyce (whom he first met at the university), Hingle moved to New York and began to get jobs on the stage and on TV. The apex of his stage career was "J.B." by poet Archibald Macleish, with Hingle in the title role as a 20th-century Job. It was during the run of "J.B." that Hingle took an accidental plunge down the elevator shaft of his New York apartment building, sustaining near-fatal injuries in the 54-foot fall. He was near death for two weeks (and lost the little finger of his left hand); his recovery took more than a year. In more recent years, Hingle has played Commissioner Gordon in the "Batman" movies.

Just prior to his death, he resided in Carolina Beach, North Carolina, with his wife, Julia.

Tia Texada

Tia Texada -born Tia Texada -- December 14 ,1979 is an American actor best known for her role as Cruz on Nbc's critically acclaimed series Third Watch, and her recurring role as an undercover agent Ribera on The Unit for Cbs. Other roles include, In Plain Sight,Saving Grace, Chuck for Nbc, Hbo's Mind of the Married Man, Everybody Hates Chris, The Amazing Spiderman feature film, Batman and Beyond, Static Shock,Firebreather and Handy Manny.She was the voice of Maybelline New York for 15 years, the number One selling cosmetic brand in the world and during her campaign of " Maybe Shes Born With it..Maybe Its Maybelline ".... it was named Brand of the Year and Launch of the Year for Lash Sensational. She was first female live announcer for the Espy Awards where she worked alongside Justin Timberlake,Jame Foxx ,Lebron James ,and Samuel Jackson for seven years. She was the voice of the winning Golden Trailer award for RoboCop feature film. Tia was the voice for launching Superbowl 50 for The Nfl Today on Cbs, Flesh and Bone for Starz, Lindt Gold Bunny, Zales , Unstoppable Collection, JC Penney World Cup Soccer IS for Girls, World Series of Poker Lady Luck for Espn, and Skittles 'Taste the Rainbow'.Tia was born with severe Strabismus and after surgery to correct this and wearing an eye patch,she took an acting class to help with her shyness,this led to her career as an actor.

Dave Legeno

A twin fisted existentialist, whose post-Nietzschian sensibilities reject the lantern of the cynic in a quest for a sun that leaves no shadow. He attended Dr Challoners Grammar School where he achieved 8 'o' levels, he then elected to work on demolition sites rather than continue his education to University level. He studied performing arts in his twenties then became a professional wrestler and then secured the role of John in Snatch. Other film and TV work followed including appearances in Eastenders,the Bill and Emmerdale as well as parts in major motion pictures such as Batman begins and Elizabeth the Golden age and when work was quiet he decided to become a professional cage fighter securing wins over LA street fighting legend Kimo Leopoldo and ex UFC heavyweight champion Dan Severn. His fight and acting career however began to clash and when he was offered a role in Steven Berkoff's On The Waterfront he had to regrettably decline due to fight commitments. Instead Berkoff attended Legeno's fight at Wembley arena where he defeated Herb Dean. When Dave was cast as Fenrir Greyback in the Harry Potter series he put his fight career on hold.

Roger Craig Smith

Born in St. Joseph, Michigan and raised in Tustin, California, Smith always had an interest in the entertainment industry. After receiving a degree in screenwriting from Chapman University Dodge College of Film and Media Arts, Smith briefly pursued writing for the big screen as a career. Though he gained recognition as a finalist in the Nicholl Fellowships in Screenwriting competition, Smith quickly found his niche in voice acting. Over the past few years Smith has done vocal work for nearly every major studio, including Disney, Cartoon Network, Warner Bros, Microsoft Game Studios, Nickelodeon, Ubisoft, Sony, E!, and TLC.

Disney's Planes, one of Smith's biggest feature film projects to date, was three years in the making. He is one of only two actors present at the first table read to retain his character through development and completion of the film. During the three years of recording sessions, Smith was expecting to be replaced by an on-camera celebrity for the final recording of the film. However, Disney recognized his enormous talent and kept him on board as "Ripslinger" for the final release of the film.

Smith supplies the voice of "Thomas" (as well as countless other characters) in Cartoon Network's Emmy Award-winning Regular Show, and he voices characters "Belson" and "Percy" in the Cartoon Network hit series Clarence. On Disney XD, Smith can be heard as iconic superhero "Captain America" for the blockbuster show Avengers Assemble.

On the video game front, his voice work includes credits such as "Sonic The Hedgehog" (also in Disney's feature film Wreck-It-Ralph and upcoming Cartoon Network series Sonic Boom!), "Batman" in Batman: Arkham Origins, "Ezio Auidtore da Firenze" in the Assassin's Creed games, and the Resident Evil series of games (as "Chris Redfield").

In addition to his film, TV animation and extensive gaming work, Smith also narrates a handful of hit television shows - including "Say Yes to the Dress" (TLC) and the DIY Network "Crashers" series of shows.

Smith resides in Chatsworth, California, where he enjoys mountain biking and playing video games. He is an active supporter of Children's Hospital of Orange County (CHOC) and Seacrest Studios/Seacrest Foundation, which entertains children in the hospital by having patients host & appear in their own radio and television programs aired throughout the hospital network.

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