1-50 of 352 names.

Mae Whitman

Mae was born in Los Angeles, California to Pat Musick, a voice artist, and Jeffrey Whitman, a personal manager and set construction coordinator. She began her career with a voice-over for a Tyson Chicken commercial. Whitman attended Ribét Academy, a private preparatory school in Los Angeles. She was later transferred to Whitefish Bay High School, where she graduated.

Whitman made her first silver screen debut playing Meg Ryan's youngest daughter, "Casey Green", in When a Man Loves a Woman (1994). Among her notable childhood roles were that of "Patricia Whitmore", daughter of the President in Independence Day (1996); George Clooney's daughter, "Maggie Taylor", in One Fine Day (1996); and the charming daughter, "Bernice Pruitt", of Sandra Bullock, in Hope Floats (1998).

As she has grown older, Mae has made several guest appearances in television shows such as JAG (1995), State of Grace (2001), Desperate Housewives (2004), Grey's Anatomy (2005) and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (1999), just to name a few, as well as some voice-over work.

In 2015, she starred in the movie The Duff (2015) portraying a high school student who realized she is the approachable one, the designated ugly fat friend, the DUFF.

We should expect to see great things from Mae Whitman as her career progresses, for she has shown what a strong, dynamic, and talented actress she has become.

Meghan Ory

Meghan Ory is a Canadian actress, she was born in Victoria, British Columbia. She Started acting in theater before her teens, but was prohibited by her mother-a drama teacher-from auditioning for film and TV roles until she could pay for her own head shots. She also made film debut in The Darklings, a 1999 cable movie starring Suzanne Somers and Timothy Bus-field. She Has written a series of teen books called Chronicles of the Girl Wars, inspired by her experiences in high school, that she has described as "Mean Girls meets Ugly Betty." She and her husband were accepted to study Shakespeare at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London in the summer of 2012.

Rachael Leigh Cook

Minneapolis native Rachael Leigh Cook began her career as a model at the tender age of 10, gracing Milk-Bone(R) boxes and Target(R) ads nationwide in the USA. She also appeared in a now-famous (in the USA) anti-drug TV spot in which, armed with a frying pan, she bashed her way through a kitchen to show the disastrous effects of heroin. At 14, her modeling agency sent her to read for a short film (26 Summer Street) and changed the course of her young life--from that moment on, Cook was hooked on acting. When she reached L.A. later that year, Cook bypassed the wannabe stage and nailed her first audition (for the part of a budding entrepreneur in The Baby-Sitters Club). She returned to theaters three months later in the Jonathan Taylor Thomas vehicle Tom and Huck, then filled her calendar with appearances in independent and made-for-TV movies. She divided her time between Minneapolis and Tinseltown, shuttling from school events to movie shoots with her mother in tow. Cook's starlet status crystallized in 1999, when she starred opposite Freddie Prinze Jr. in the Pygmalion retelling She's All That. Her on-screen transformation from ugly duckling to ravishing beauty scored several teen-oriented awards and made Cook a hot commodity in Hollywood. She signed for a handful of plum follow-up roles, including a troubled adolescent in Sylvester Stallone's Get Carter, a frontier gal in Texas Rangers, and the caterwauling lead in the live-action version of Josie and the Pussycats. Cook now lives primarily in Los Angeles, but she returns home frequently to visit with friends and family. Her father, Tom (a former stand-up comic), is a social worker in the public school system, and her younger brother, Ben, is an aspiring filmmaker.

America Ferrera

America Georgine Ferrera (born April 18, 1984) is an American actress. She is known for her leading role as Betty Suarez on the American Broadcasting Company's comedy-drama television series Ugly Betty (2006-10). Her acting garnered critical acclaim, and she won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress - Television Series Musical or Comedy, the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series, and the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series.

DeWanda Wise

Critically acclaimed artist DeWanda Wise is a graduate of New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, training primarily at the Atlantic Theatre Company Acting School. While training at Tisch, DeWanda began her professional career with roles in many award-winning shorts and independent features including "Spinning into Butter," and "Precious" among others.

Adept in theater and film, acting, writing, and producing, DeWanda is an artist with some serious promise. She stars as Spike Lee's iconic Nola Daling in the Netflix adaptation of "She's Gotta Have It," in addition to the heart-wrenching role of Shameeka Campbell in Fox event series "Shots Fired," alongside Sanaa Lathan, Helen Hunt, and Richard Dreyfuss. Additionally, her first pass at screenwriting "Where You Go," premiered at Cannes in the Short Film Corner. DeWanda also stars as Rochelle Marseilles in the Sundance hit "How To Tell You're a Douchebag", a romantic comedy she executive produced. Indiewire described her performance in Tahir Jetter's debut as, "Sensational, commanding, profound, and dope."

Previous credits include a host of theater roles, notably originating the role of Nina in acclaimed playwright Dominique Morisseau's "Sunset Baby." Ben Brantley of The New York Times stated,"...it's the woman who's the toughest of them all. Ms. Wise, a beauty, makes us see and feel just how ugly Nina is...she also insists we understand why." The Village Voice called her Nina, "commanding and severe," while The New Yorker described her performance as "Brutal and riveting." Other praised performances include her work as Susan in the west coast premiere of David Mamet's "Race" with Center Theater Group, Mercy in "Flight," at City Theatre, and Abigail, a Zimbabwean wife grappling with an HIV diagnosis, in Danai Gurira's heartbreaking first play, "In the Continuum" at Playmakers, Chapel Hill.

Other TV credits including staring as Terry in movie of the week "Firelight," with Cuba Gooding Jr. where critics called her "touching," "exceptional," and, "the heart of the film." Additional guest turns include "Boardwalk Empire," "The Good Wife," "The Mentalist," and the Law and Order franchise.

DeWanda graduated with honors with a dual degree in Drama and Urban Social and Cultural Analysis with a minor in Community-based Theater and Performance. Ms. Wise is a Tisch Scholar Award recipient, the Atlantic Achievement in Studio Award recipient, and the BFA Representative of her graduating class of NYU's Tisch School of the Arts.

A native of Baltimore, Maryland, DeWanda currently resides in California with her husband actor/producer, Alano Miller.

Izabella Miko

Born in what was then Communist Poland in January 1981 to accomplished thespian parents, Grazyna Dylag and Aleksander Mikolajczak, Izabella Miko could dance before she could walk. She began to pursue her dream career as a ballerina as soon as it was available to her at the age of 10. Izabella was accepted at the National Ballet School in Warsaw and, though her teachers were concerned about what seemed to be some flexibility limitations of her body from the start, Izabella was determined to realize her dream. She would simply need to train harder and longer than the other dancers, and so she did. She became accomplished so quickly that at the age of 15 she was recruited to go to New York on full scholarship and study at the School of American Ballet. Izabella was on her way to the NYC Ballet and the spotlight of her dreams. However, her body could no longer withstand the rigors of a seven-day a week ballet-training schedule, and in 1997 she suffered from vertebrae, knee and ankle injuries - in a blink, her career as a ballet dancer was over.

She found herself 17 years old and wondering what career she would ever find that would fulfill her soul the same way dance did. It didn't take long for destiny to reveal its new and improved plan for Izabella. While back in Warsaw and recovering, a casting director who was working with Izabella's parents asked if she would play a part in a TV movie, "Lithuania You're My Motherland". She accepted, not knowing where else to turn. From the first moment in front of the cameras, Izabella was hooked. Her calling to act rang so loudly in her heart that it was unmistakable and made so much sense out of what was up until that moment a confusing disappointment.

Once bitten by the acting bug, and never a lady to do anything only half way, shortly before her 18th birthday Izabella was headed back to America, only this time, as an actor. She immediately began training at The Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute and laying the groundwork for a successful career as an actor. Sewn instantly into the hearts of everyone she meets, it didn't take long before the business urged Izabella to become a bi-coastal performer. She came out to Los Angeles just after she turned 18 and a series of fortuitous event resulted in her landing a much sought-after role in Jerry Bruckheimer's Coyote Ugly playing the heart-breaker "Cammie". This role put her on the fast track in Hollywood, and she also got a slew of magazine covers and billboards as well! She followed "Coyote Ugly" with a leading role in J.S. Cardone's The Forsaken and Minimal Knowledge. She has also appeared in The Shore, starring along side Lesley Ann Warren and Ben Gazzara. With a deep passion for dance, movement and the spotlight ever in her soul, Izabella starred alongside hugely accomplished actors Derek Jacobi and Michael Lonsdale in Bye Bye Blackbird. Her portrayal of Alice, a circus trapeze artist in the early 1900s, was the perfect combination of Izabella's most innate talents. She prepared for this role with a rigorous three-month training schedule on both the flying and static trapeze. Utilizing her dance and trapeze skills, along with rapidly learned tightrope walking (which given her skills, wasn't that difficult), she secured a part time role of Raia, a member of the "Circus of Crime" circus troop in the 2011 NBC series The Cape.

Stockard Channing

One of Broadway and Hollywood's cleverer talents who tends to shine a smart, cynical light on her surroundings, Stockard Channing was born Susan Williams Antonia Stockard on February 13, 1944, in New York City, to a Catholic family, with English and Irish ancestry. The daughter of Lester Napier Stockard, a well-to-do shipping executive, and Mary Alice (née English) Stockard, her father died when she was 16 and left her a sizable estate. She grew up in Brooklyn and attended the prolific Chapin School in NYC, then later attended the Madeira School, a Virginia boarding school for girls. She studied at Radcliffe College where she majored in both literature and history before graduating summa cum laude in 1965. In 1964, at the age of 20, she married the first of four husbands, Walter Channing Jr., a businessman whose last name she kept as part of her own stage moniker after their divorce four years later.

Stockard made her stage debut in a production of "The Investigation" at the experimental Theatre Company of Boston in 1966. She went on to play a number of offbeat roles with the company. She eventually migrated to New York where she took her first Broadway bow as a chorus member and understudy in the musical version of "Two Gentlemen of Verona" in 1971. Two years later she would take over the prime role of Julia in the L.A. national company. Other theater roles during this time included "Adaptation/Next" (1970) "Arsenic and Old Lace" (1970), "Play Strindberg" (1971) and "No Hard Feelings" (1973).

Somewhat plaintive yet unique-looking, the dark-haired actress began first appearing in pictures with small parts in the dark comedy The Hospital and the edgy Barbra Streisand fantasy-drama Up the Sandbox. Taking on the top female lead as an heiress and potential victim of shysters Jack Nicholson and Warren Beatty in Mike Nichols' comedy The Fortune, the film, despite its male star power, would not become the star-making hit for Channing as initially hoped and Channing. Her next two films (The Big Bus and Sweet Revenge) faded away even quicker. Earlier, however, she hit a home with the TV-movie The Girl Most Likely to..., a clever black comedy written by Joan Rivers wherein Stockard played a former ugly duckling-turned-beauty (à la plastic surgery) who knocks off the men who formerly mistreated her. This was Channing at her smart and cynical best, traits that would carry her far in Hollywood.

At the age of 33(!), she was handed the feisty role of high school teen Betty Rizzo in the box-office film version of the hit musical Grease starring Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta. While long in the tooth for such a role (as were others), Stockard's sly performance earned her the People's Choice Awards for Favorite Motion Picture Supporting Actress. This popular film clinched her place as a top-ranking contender.

As a result, she was handed two sitcom vehicles within a year on CBS: Stockard Channing in Just Friends, as a newly-separated wife starting life anew in another city (L.A.), and The Stockard Channing Show, which again cast her as a divorced lady trying to find herself again in L.A. Neither made her a TV star. Both failed to catch on and lasted but a few months. Stalled at a critical juncture in her career, Stockard decided to return to her first love -- the theater. With "Vanities", "Absurd Person Singular" and "As You Like It" (as Rosalind) already on her resume, she earned fine notices on Broadway with the musical "They're Playing Our Song" replacing Lucie Arnaz in 1980, then garnered rave reviews in the part of the mother of a developmentally disabled child in the New Haven production of Peter Nichols' "A Day in the Death of Joe Egg" in 1982. She repeated her role on Broadway a few years later (the title now shortened to "Joe Egg") and copped the 1985 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play. Subsequent Tony nominations came her way for her offbeat work in "The House of Blue Leaves" (1986); "Six Degrees of Separation" (1991) (for which she also won an Off-Broadway Obie), "Four Baboons Adoring the Sun" (1992); and for her Eleanor of Aquitaine in "The Lion in Winter" in 1999.

Award-worthy projects came her way on TV as well. Nominated for an Emmy for the CBS miniseries Echoes in the Darkness, she also won a CableACE Award for her work in Tidy Endings. In film, she received Oscar and Golden Globe nominations when her stage triumph, Six Degrees of Separation, was turned into a film and also received the London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress in the film _Business of Strangers, The (2001).

In 1999, Stockard became a recurring member of the cast of The West Wing as First Lady Abigail Bartlet. Audiences were so drawn to her shrewd, classy character that producers wisely started featuring her regularly into the third season. In 2002 she won both Emmy and SAG awards for this role, as well as a second Emmy that same year for her supporting turn as Judy Sheppard in The Matthew Shepard Story, a docudrama about the gay-bashing murder of young Matthew Shepard. Stockard thought she finally found sitcom success with the series Out of Practice and was even Emmy-nominated for her role as a sharp-tongued but caring doctor. As luck would have it, she again couldn't find a core audience and the show lasted but a mere season.

Stockard continues to excel in sly, worldly roles that combine a dark wit with an even darker cynical edge. True to form, she recently completed a picture aptly titled Multiple Sarcasms. Divorced four times, including one to writer/producer David Debin, she has no children. She has been in a long-term relationship with cinematographer Daniel Gillham since 1988. A sister, Lesly Stockard Smith, became mayor of Palm Beach in 2000.

Eli Wallach

One of Hollywood's finest character / "Method" actors, Eli Wallach was in demand for over 60 years (first film/TV role was 1949) on stage and screen, and has worked alongside the world's biggest stars, including Clark Gable, Clint Eastwood, Steve McQueen, Marilyn Monroe, Yul Brynner, Peter O'Toole, and Al Pacino, to name but a few.

Wallach was born on 7 December 1915 in Brooklyn, NY, to Jewish parents who emigrated from Poland, and was one of the few Jewish kids in his mostly Italian neighborhood. His parents, Bertha (Schorr) and Abraham Wallach, owned a candy store, Bertha's Candy Store. He went on to graduate with a B.A. from the University of Texas in Austin, but gained his dramatic training with the Actors Studio and the Neighborhood Playhouse. He made his debut on Broadway in 1945, and won a Tony Award in 1951 for portraying Alvaro Mangiacavallo in the Tennessee Williams play "The Rose Tattoo".

Wallach made a strong screen debut in 1956 in the film version of the Tennessee Williams play Baby Doll, shined as "Dancer", the nattily dressed hitman, in director Don Siegel's film-noir classic The Lineup, and co-starred in the heist film Seven Thieves. Director John Sturges then cast Wallach as vicious Mexican bandit Calvera in The Magnificent Seven, the western adaptation of the Akira Kurosawa epic Seven Samurai. By all reports, Wallach could not ride a horse prior to making "TMS", but expert tutelage from the film's Mexican stunt riders made it look easy! He next appeared in the superb The Misfits, in the star-spangled western opus How the West Was Won, the underrated WW2 film The Victors, as a kidnapper in The Moon-Spinners, in the sea epic Lord Jim and in the romantic comedy How to Steal a Million.

Looking for a third lead actor in the final episode of the "Dollars Trilogy", Italian director Sergio Leone cast the versatile Wallach as the lying, two-faced, money-hungry (but somehow lovable) bandit "Tuco" in the spectacular The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (aka "The Good, The Bad and The Ugly"), arguably his most memorable performance. Wallach kept busy throughout the remainder of the '60s and into the '70s with good roles in Mackenna's Gold, Cinderella Liberty, Crazy Joe, The Deep and as Steve McQueen's bail buddy in The Hunter.

The 1980s was an interesting period for Wallach, as he was regularly cast as an aging doctor, a Mafia figure or an over-the-hill hitman, such as in The Executioner's Song, Our Family Honor, Tough Guys, Nuts, The Two Jakes and as the candy-addicted "Don Altabello" in The Godfather: Part III. At 75+ years of age, Wallach's quality of work was still first class and into the 1990s and beyond, he has remained in demand. He lent fine support to Bride of Violence, Teamster Boss: The Jackie Presser Story, Naked City: Justice with a Bullet and Keeping the Faith. Most recently Wallach showed up as a fast-talking liquor store owner in Mystic River and in the comedic drama King of the Corner.

In early 2005, Eli Wallach released his much anticipated autobiography, "The Good, The Bad And Me: In My Anecdotage", an enjoyable reading from one of the screen's most inventive and enduring actors.

Eli Wallach was very much a family man who remained married to his wife Anne Jackson for 66 years. When Wallach died at 98, in 2014, in Manhattan, NY, he was survived by his wife, three children, five grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.

Robert Shaw

Robert Archibald Shaw was born on August 9, 1927 in Westhoughton, Lancashire, England, the eldest son of Doreen Nora (Avery), a nurse, and Thomas Archibald Shaw, a doctor. His paternal grandfather was Scottish, from Argyll. Shaw's mother, who was born in Piggs Peak, Swaziland, met his father while she was a nurse at a hospital in Truro, Cornwall. His father was an alcoholic and a manic depressive; he committed suicide when Robert was only 12. He had three sisters, Elisabeth, Joanna and Wendy and one brother, Alexander.

As a boy, he attended school in Truro and was quite an athlete, competing in rugby, squash and track events but turned down an offer for a scholarship at 17 to go to London with furthering education in Cambridge as he did not want a career in medicine but luckily for the rest of us, in acting. He was also inspired by one of the schoolmasters, Cyril Wilkes who got him to read just about everything, including all of the classics. He would take three or four of the boys to London to see plays. The first play Robert would ever see was "Hamlet" in 1944 with Sir John Gielgud at the Haymarket. Robert went to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts with a £1,000 inheritance from his grandmother. He went on from the Academy, after two years (1946-1948) to Stratford-on-Avon, where he was directed by Gielgud who said to Shaw, "I do admire you and think you've got a lot of ability, and I'd like to help you, but you make me so nervous." He then went on to make his professional stage debut in 1949 and tour Australia in the same year with the Old Vic.

He had joined the Old Vic at the invitation of Tyrone Guthrie, who had directed him as the Duke of Suffolk in "Henry VIII" at Stratford. He played nothing but lesser Shakespearean roles, Cassio in "Othello" and Lysander in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and toured Europe and South Africa with the company. Shaw was sold on Shakespeare and thought that it would be his theatrical life at that stage. He was discovered whilst performing in "Much Ado About Nothing" in 1950 at Stratford by Sir Alec Guinness who suggested he come to London to do Hamlet with him. He then went on to his first film role, a very small part in the classic The Lavender Hill Mob with Guinness but a start nonetheless. It was also at this time that he married his first wife, Jennifer Bourne, an actress he had met while working at the Old Vic and married her in Sallsbury, South Rhodesia on August 1, 1952. Together, they would have four daughters, Deborah, Penny, Rachel and Katherine.

He would also appear briefly in The Dam Busters and did the London production of "Tiger at the Gates" in June of 1955 as Topman. He would also make "Hill in Korea" around this time and then, after taking on several jobs as a struggling actor and to support his growing family, he would be cast as Dan Tempest in The Buccaneers. Shaw did not take his role seriously but made £10,000 for eight months work. It was around this time that he wrote his first novel, "The Hiding Place." It was a success, selling twelve thousand copies in England and about the same in France and in the United States. He also wrote a dramatization of it that was produced on commercial television in England and Playhouse 90 aired a different dramatization in America. Around 1959, he became involved with the well-known actress Mary Ure, who was married to the actor John Osborne at the time. He slipped her his telephone number one night at 3:00 a.m. while visiting the couple and she called him the next day. It was around this time, in 1960, that Robert Shaw became a reporter for England's Queen magazine and covered the Olympics in Rome. Shaw and Ure acted together in Middleton's The Changeling at the Royal Court Theatre in London in 1961. He was playing the part of an ugly servant in love with the mistress of the house who persuades him to murder her fiance. Shaw and Ure had a child on August 31st, even though they were still married to their other spouses. His wife Jennifer and Ure had children to him only weeks apart from each other. Mary divorced Osborne and married Shaw in April 1963. The couple was often quoted by the press as being, "very much in love" and together, they would have four children together; Colin, Elizabeth, Hannah and Ian. That same year, after making the next two films, The Valiant and The Guest, he made From Russia with Love and was unforgettable as the blonde assassin, Donald 'Red' Grant.

He also made Tomorrow at Ten, as well as TV version of Hamlet as Claudius. He would then film The Luck of Ginger Coffey with Ure and then star in Battle of the Bulge as the German Panzer commander Hessler. He wrote "The Flag" on the set of the film . He was nominated for his next role, as Henry VIII in A Man for All Seasons, an outstanding, unequal led performance. He would write his fourth novel "The Man in the Glass Booth", which was later made into a play with Donald Pleasence and later into a film with Maximilian Schell. In 1967, he again starred with his wife in Custer of the West, then on to The Birthday Party (1969) and Battle of Britain. One of his best performances of this decade was also as the Spanish conqueror Pizarro in The Royal Hunt of the Sun. His last published novel, "A Card from Morocco" was also a big success and he went on to make Figures in a Landscape with Malcolm McDowell as two escaped convicts in a Latin American country. As the father of Churchill in Young Winston he was once again his brilliant self, and stole the scene from John Mills, Patrick Magee, Anthony Hopkins and Ian Holm. After his portrayal of Lord Randolph Churchill, he made A Reflection of Fear, a horror movie with Ure, Sondra Locke and Sally Kellerman. As the chauffeur Steven Ledbetter in The Hireling he falls in love with Sarah Miles, an aristocratic widow he helps recover from a nervous breakdown. It took the prestigious Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival and was quite a thought provoking film.

It was his performances in the following two films, the USA produced The Sting and The Taking of Pelham One Two Three that Shaw became familiar once again to American audiences but it is his portrayal as a grizzled Irish shark hunter, named Quint, in Jaws that everyone remembers, even to this day. Hard to believe that Shaw wasn't that impressed with the script and even confided to a friend, Hector Elizondo, "They want me to do a movie about this big fish. I don't know if I should do it or not." When Elizondo asked why Shaw had reservations he mentioned that he'd never heard of the director and didn't like the title, "JAWS." It is also incredible that as the biggest box office film, which was the first movie to gross more than $100 million worldwide, he had ever been part of, he didn't make a cent from it because of the taxes he had to pay from working in the United States, Canada and Ireland. It was also during this time that he became a depressed recluse following the death of his wife who took an accidental overdose of barbiturates and alcohol. Some have speculated throughout the years that her death was suicidal but there was no reason for it and this is mere sensationalism. Following Diamonds he made End of the Game, then another brilliant performance as the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin and Marian. During the same year, he also made Swashbuckler with Geneviève Bujold and James Earl Jones, a very light-hearted pirate adventure.

His next film Black Sunday, with Shaw playing an Israeli counter-terrorist agent trying to stop a terrorist organization, called Black September, which is plotting an attack at the Super Bowl, was a big success both with critics and at the box office. I wasn't surprised considering the depth that he was also involved in writing the script although he didn't receive billing for it. Shaw was very happy with the success of his acting career, but he remained a depressed recluse in his personal life until he finished Black Sunday when he found himself in love with his secretary of 15 years, Virginia Dewitt Jansen (Jay). They were wed on July 29, 1976 in Hamilton, Bermuda. He adopted her son Charles and the couple also had one son, Thomas. During his stay in Bermuda, Shaw began work on his next movie, The Deep which teamed him and writer Peter Benchley once again and maybe that was a mistake, in that everyone expected another Jaws. At one point, discussing how bad the film was going, Shaw could be quoted as saying to Nick Nolte, "It's a treasure picture Nick, it's a treasure picture".

It did well at the box office but not with critics, although they did hail Shaw as the saving grace. He had done it for the money, as he was to do with his next film, for he had decided when Ure had died that life was short and that he needed to provide for his ten children. In 1977, Shaw traveled to Yugoslavia where he starred in Force 10 from Navarone, a sequel to The Guns of Navarone, he revived the lead role of the British MI6 agent Mallory originally played by Gregory Peck. He was a big box office draw and some producers were willing to pay top wages for his work, but he felt restricted by the parts he was being offered. "I have it in mind to stop making these big-budget extravaganzas, to change my pattern of life. I wanted to prove, I think, that I could be an international movie star. Now that I've done it, I see the valuelessness of it." In early 1978, Shaw appeared in Avalanche Express which was to become his last film in which he played General Marenkov, a senior Russian official who decides to defect to the west and reveals to a CIA agent, played by Lee Marvin, that the Russians are trying to develop biological weapons. An alcoholic most of his life, Shaw died, before the film was completed, of a heart attack at the age of 51 on August 28, 1978. In poor health due to alcoholism during most of the filming, he in fact completed over 90% of his scenes before the death of director Mark Robson two months earlier in June 1978 brought production to a halt.

While living in Ireland and taking a hiatus from working, Shaw was driving from Castlebar to his home in Tourmakeady, Ireland with wife, Virginia, and young son, Thomas, after spending the day playing golf with friends on a local course as well as shopping with her in the town. As they approached their cottage, he felt chest pains which he claimed to Virginia that they had started earlier that day while he was playing golf but the pains subsided. He pulled the car over a few hundred yards from his cottage and told her he would get out and walk them off. After taking four or five steps from the parked car, he collapsed by the side of the road in which his wife ran to the cottage to phone for help. An ambulance arrived 15 minutes later where Shaw was taken to Mayo General Hospital in Castlebar where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Olga Fonda

Olga Fonda is a model and actress. At age 14, she left her hometown for a year to be an exchange student in the United States. After returning home, she continued her education by studying Business-Economics at a university in Moscow. The brainy beauty began modeling after she returned to the States and was quickly signed by Ford Models when they recognized her star-potential.

Best known for her recurring role in TNT's action drama "Agent X" opposite Sharon Stone and Jeff Hephner. Fonda played 'Olga Petrovka,' a mysterious and fearless Russian spy. She will next be seen in the CBS hit, "Hawaii 5-0" and in the action/drama film Nine Eleven; opposite Whoopi Goldberg, Luis Guzman, and Wood Harris.

Fonda's big break came when she was cast alongside Hugh Jackman in the 2011 blockbuster Real Steel. Additionally, Fonda is best known for playing fan-favorite 'Nadia,' daughter of Katherine (Nina Dobrev), in the popular CW drama "The Vampire Diaries". Other credits include some of the biggest shows & films of the last few years, such as "Ugly Betty," "Entourage," "Nip/Tuck," "How I Met Your Mother," and Little Fockers. She also appeared in the independent feature Love Hurts.

As a woman of many talents, she is trained in the martial art krav maga, as well as karate, sword-fighting, motocross, snowboarding, etc. She often enjoys performing her own stunts.

Nelsan Ellis

Nelsan Ellis (born c. 1978) is an award-winning American film and television actor and playwright, perhaps best known as Lafayette Reynolds on HBO's True Blood.

Ellis was born in Harvey, Illinois. Following his parents' divorce, Ellis and his mother moved to Alabama. He moved back to Illinois as a teenager, and graduated from Thornridge High School in Dolton, Illinois, in 1997. Ellis attended Juilliard and, while there, wrote a semi-autobiographical play titled Ugly that was performed at the school and later won the Lincoln Center's Martin E. Segal Award. Ellis won a 2008 Satellite Award from the International Press Academy for best supporting actor in a television series for his role as Lafayette Reynolds in HBO's True Blood. Ellis won the "Brink of Fame: Actor" award at the 2009 NewNowNext Awards.

Miranda Frigon

Miranda Frigon is a Canadian born Actress and Singer-Songwriter. Most well known for her leading role in Primeval: New World for which she was nominated "Best Supporting Actress" at the Canadian Leo Awards in 2013. Her work as an actress can be seen on Canadian and U.S. Television and feature films spanning over the last 15years.

Born in Edmonton Alberta, Miranda grew up a competitive gymnast and ballet dancer since the age of 4. She danced for over 18years, touring with a professional dance company for several years before returning to gymnastics and competing on the Varsity gymnastics team while attending the University of Alberta where she studied as a theatre major. Miranda received a scholarship to a musical theatre school in NYC where she trained for the next few years before booking a recurring on the Disney series "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" . Since, then she has guest starred on numerous major network series including "Dexter, "Ugly Betty", "The New Adventures of Old Christine", "Supernatural", "Emily Owens M.D.", "V", "Sanctuary" and CBC's hit drama "Arctic Air" to name a few, was recurring on CBC / CW's "Heartland" for 3 seasons, been a series regular on Syfy's original series "Primeval: New World" and starred in many feature and indie films.

Miranda is also well known as a singer-songwriter. Her original songs can be heard on major network television shows including FOX, CW, CBC, Syfy, Space Channel (Canada), Watch (UK) and have aired all over the world in series and feature films. Because of her song placements, her fan base has spread across the globe.

In addition to all of her creative and athletic talents, Miranda is also a highly skilled Mixed Martial Artist. She has been trained in Boxing and Thai Kickboxing for over 10 years.

Betty Garrett

A sunny singer, dancer and comic actress, Betty Garrett starred in several Hollywood musicals and stage roles. She was at the top of her game when the Communist scare in the 1950s brought her career to a screeching, ugly halt. She and her husband Larry Parks, an Oscar-nominated actor, were summoned by the House UnAmerican Activities Committee and questioned about their involvement.

As the drama played out, a very pregnant Garrett was never called to testify, but her husband was. With his admission of Communist Party membership from 1941-1945 and refusal to name names, he made it to the Hollywood Blacklist. After the incident, Garrett and Parks worked up nightclub singing/comedy acts along with appearing in legit plays. Although Parks never quite shook off the blacklist incident, he did win a role in John Huston's film, Freud. Garrett went on to appear in roles in many television series.

Lorraine Toussaint

SAG Award and Critics Choice Award winner for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series, Lorraine Toussaint shocked audiences on the smash hit Netflix original series "Orange is the New Black" as the viciously seductive inmate Vee. Toussaint's epically thrilling performance has won her glowing reviews from the likes of TV Guide and Vanity Fair, stirring the Emmy buzz for her outstanding performance. Toussaint also received praise for her performance in the Academy Award nominated feature film "Selma." Up next, Toussaint will star in the new Fox series "Rosewood," alongside Morris Chestnut, which premieres this fall.

Born in Trinidad and raised in Brooklyn, NY, Toussaint and her mother moved to Brooklyn when she was ten years old. Growing up, she watched a lot of television while she waited for her mother to return from work and this sparked her interest in acting. Toussaint begged her mother to enroll her in acting school and her search lead to her studying theater at New York's renowned High School of Performing Arts. After graduation, she enrolled herself at the Juilliard School's drama division where she graduated with a Bachelors of Fine Arts degree. On her graduation day, she landed her first paying job as Lady Macbeth with "Shakespeare & Company."

Toussaint spent the first 12 years of her career acting on stage in New York City before moving to Los Angeles. Her first television appearance was in 1983 in "The Face of Rage." Toussaint's biggest career boost has come from her co-starring role opposite Annie Potts in the TV series "Any Day Now," which earned Toussaint an NAACP Image Award nomination for best actress in a drama series, a TV Guide Award nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series and she received the Wiley A. Branton Award from the National Bar Association.

Among Toussaint's TV credits were recurring roles on several popular television shows such as NBC's drama series "Friday Night Lights," TNT's "Saving Grace," "Law & Order," and ABC's hit "ugly Betty." She has also had several guest appearances on the hit television shows "CSI: Crime Investigation," "Grey's Anatomy," and opposite Kerry Washington on drama thriller "Scandal."

No stranger to the silver screen, Touissant's first film role was opposite Burt Reynolds in the crime comedy "Breaking In." Touissant has also appeared in "Dangerous Minds," "The Soloist," and Ava DuVernay's "Middle of Nowhere," in which her performance was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female. Up next, Toussaint stars as Salome Whitmore in the upcoming period drama, "Sophie and the Rising Sun," written and directed by Maggie Greenwald. Toussaint will also play Anthony Mackie's mother in the upcoming Seth Rogen comedy "X-Mas," in theaters this November.

Toussaint and her daughter currently split their time between New York and Los Angeles.

Adam Garcia

Adam Garcia is an Australian actor and tap dancer of partial Colombian descent (his father is from Colombia).

Garcia left university to take the role of Slide in the production of the musical Hot Shoe Shuffle, which toured Australia before transferring to London, England. Garcia stayed on in London to act in West End musicals.

Garcia played Doody in the West End's version of Grease in London. He also played a Travolta character, Tony Manero, in the stage version of Saturday Night Fever, which ran from 1998 to 1999 in London. Garcia was nominated for an Olivier Award for his performance. Garcia reached #15 in the UK singles chart in 1998, with his cover version of the Bee Gees song "Night Fever", taken from Saturday Night Fever. In 2000, Garcia performed a solo Tap dance in the Sydney Olympic Opening Ceremony

Garcia has been nominated for multiple awards during his stage acting career. His transition into a film actor began in 1997, when he played Jones in Wilde, a movie about the life of writer Oscar Wilde. Garcia then went on to act in such movies as Coyote Ugly, Bootmen & Riding In Cars With Boys and, in 2004, the role of rock star Stu Wolf in Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen

He appeared as government official Alex Klein in the 2005 Christmas special of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. According to the audio commentary for the episode, Garcia accepted the relatively minor role as he is a science fiction fan. . Garcia worked with Idina Menzel and Kristin Chenoweth to help create the role of Fiyero in the 2002 workshop edition of an in-production musical called Wicked. After Wicked's success, the show soon spawned a London production, in which Garcia got to play the role of Fiyero. The show opened 27 September 2006, after previews began 7 September. He played his final performance 14 July 2007.

In the latter part of 2008, Garcia appeared in two ITV dramas, Britannia High in which he plays the dance teacher, and Mr Eleven, a two-part comedy/drama alongside Michelle Ryan and Sean Maguire. In January 2010 Garcia appeared alongside Ashley Banjo and Kimberly Wyatt as a judge on the reality show Got To Dance. He also was a judge on Australias' Dancing With The Stars for 2 seasons

He made a guest appearance alongside Franki "Searing" Sears in Episode 19 (The Choice) on 6 of House.

In 2010 Garcia starred in the London West End production of Tap Dogs in the Novello Theatre from 15 June to 5 September. In 2012 Garcia received another Olivier nomination for his performance of Bill Calhoun/Lucentio in Trevor Nunn's revival of Kiss Me Kate at the Old Vic.

In 2016, Garcia created Father Damien Karras for Birmingham Repertory Theatre's production of The Exorcist.

Ray Milland

Ray Milland became one of Paramount's most bankable and durable stars, under contract from 1934 to 1948, yet little in his early life suggested a career as a motion picture actor.

Milland was born Alfred Reginald Jones in the Welsh town of Neath, Glamorgan, to Elizabeth Annie (Truscott) and Alfred Jones. He spent his youth in the pursuit of sports. He became an expert rider early on, working at his uncle's horse-breeding estate while studying at the King's College in Cardiff. At 21, he went to London as a member of the elite Household Cavalry (Guard for the Royal Family), undergoing a rigorous 19-months training, further honing his equestrian skills, as well as becoming adept at fencing, boxing and shooting. He won trophies, including the Bisley Match, with his unit's crack rifle team. However, after four years, he suddenly lost his means of financial support (independent income being a requirement as a Guardsman) when his stepfather discontinued his allowance. Broke, he tried his hand at acting in small parts on the London stage.

There are several stories as to how he derived his stage name. It is known, that during his teens he called himself "Mullane", using his stepfather's surname. He may later have suffused "Mullane" with "mill-lands", an area near his hometown. When he first appeared on screen in British films, he was billed first as Spike Milland, then Raymond Milland.

In 1929, Ray befriended the popular actress Estelle Brody at a party and, later that year, visited her on the set of her latest film, The Plaything. While having lunch, they were joined by a producer who persuaded the handsome Welshman to appear in a motion picture bit part. Ray rose to the challenge and bigger roles followed, including the male lead in The Lady from the Sea. The following year, he was signed by MGM and went to Hollywood, but was given little to work with, except for the role of Charles Laughton's ill-fated nephew in Payment Deferred. After a year, Ray was out of his contract and returned to England.

His big break did not come until 1934 when he joined Paramount, where he was to remain for the better part of his Hollywood career. During the first few years, he served an apprenticeship playing second leads, usually as the debonair man-about-town, in light romantic comedies. He appeared with Burns and Allen in Many Happy Returns, enjoyed third-billing as a British aristocrat in the Claudette Colbert farce The Gilded Lily and was described as "excellent" by reviewers for his role in the sentimental drama Alias Mary Dow. By 1936, he had graduated to starring roles, first as the injured British hunter rescued on a tropical island by The Jungle Princess, the film which launched Dorothy Lamour's sarong-clad career. After that, he was the titular hero of Bulldog Drummond Escapes and, finally, won the girl (rather than being the "other man") in Mitchell Leisen's screwball comedy Easy Living. He also re-visited the tropics in Ebb Tide, Her Jungle Love and Tropic Holiday, as well as being one of the three valiant brothers of Beau Geste.

In 1940, Ray was sent back to England to star in the screen adaptation of Terence Rattigan's French Without Tears, for which he received his best critical reviews to date. He was top-billed (above John Wayne) running a ship salvage operation in Cecil B. DeMille's lavish Technicolor adventure drama Reap the Wild Wind, besting Wayne in a fight - much to the "Duke's" personal chagrin - and later wrestling with a giant octopus. Also that year, he was directed by Billy Wilder in a charming comedy, The Major and the Minor (co-starred with Ginger Rogers), for which he garnered good notices from Bosley Crowther of the New York Times. Ray then played a ghost hunter in The Uninvited, and the suave hero caught in a web of espionage in Fritz Lang's thriller Ministry of Fear.

On the strength of his previous role as "Major Kirby", Billy Wilder chose to cast Ray against type in the ground-breaking drama The Lost Weekend as dipsomaniac writer "Don Birnam". Ray gave the defining performance of his career, his intensity catching critics, used to him as a lightweight leading man, by surprise. Crowther commented "Mr. Milland, in a splendid performance, catches all the ugly nature of a 'drunk', yet reveals the inner torment and degradation of a respectable man who knows his weakness and his shame" (New York Times, December 3, 1945). Arrived at the high point of his career, Ray Milland won the Oscar for Best Actor, as well as the New York Critic's Award. Rarely given such good material again, he nonetheless featured memorably in many more splendid films, often exploiting the newly discovered "darker side" of his personality: as the reporter framed for murder by Charles Laughton's heinous publishing magnate in The Big Clock; as the sophisticated, manipulating art thief "Mark Bellis" in the Victorian melodrama So Evil My Love (for which producer Hal B. Wallis sent him back to England); as a Fedora-wearing, Armani-suited "Lucifer", trawling for the soul of an honest District Attorney in Alias Nick Beal; and as a traitorous scientist in The Thief, giving what critics described as a "sensitive" and "towering" performance. In 1954, Ray played calculating ex-tennis champ "Tony Wendice", who blackmails a former Cambridge chump into murdering his wife, in Alfred Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder. He played the part with urbane sophistication and cold detachment throughout, even in the scene of denouement, calmly offering a drink to the arresting officers.

With Lisbon, Ray Milland moved into another direction, turning out several off-beat, low-budget films with himself as the lead, notably The Safecracker and Panic in Year Zero!. At the same time, he cheerfully made the transition to character parts, often in horror and sci-fi outings. In accordance with his own dictum of appearing in anything that had "any originality", he worked on two notable pictures with Roger Corman: first, as a man obsessed with catalepsy in Premature Burial; secondly, as obsessed self-destructive surgeon "Dr. Xavier" in X: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes-the Man with X-Ray Eyes, a film which, despite its low budget, won the 1963 Golden Asteroid in the Trieste Festival for Science Fiction.

As the years went on, Ray gradually disposed of his long-standing toupee, lending dignity through his presence to many run-of-the-mill television films, such as Cave In! and maudlin melodramas like Love Story. He guest-starred in many anthology series on television and had notable roles in Rod Serling's Night Gallery and the original Battlestar Galactica (as Quorum member Sire Uri). He also enjoyed a brief run on Broadway, starring as "Simon Crawford" in "Hostile Witness" (1966), at the Music Box Theatre.

In his private life, Ray was an enthusiastic yachtsman, who loved fishing and collecting information by reading the Encyclopedia Brittanica. In later years, he became very popular with interviewers because of his candid spontaneity and humour. In the same self-deprecating vein he wrote an anecdotal biography, "Wide-Eyed in Babylon", in 1976. A film star, as well as an outstanding actor, Ray Milland died of cancer at the age of 81 in March 1986.

Vicki Lewis

Starred on Broadway as Velma Kelly in "Chicago", The Tony nominated "Damn Yankees", "The Crucible", performed as a soloist with the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, "Pal Joey" (with Peter Gallagher and Patti Lupone.) Her voice can be heard in scores of animated television and films, most notably, "Finding Nemo", "Wonder Woman", Justice League", "Ben 10", "Phineas and Ferb", "Alpha And Omega",and the upcoming "Batman". She starred as Beth in NBC's "Newsradio" and "Three Sisters"( also for NBC). She has appeared in countless television and film roles most notably "The Ugly Truth", "Mousehunt", "Pushing Tin", "Breakfast Of Champions", "Godzilla", "I'll Do Anything", "Curb Your Enthusiasm", "The Middle", "Grey's Anatomy", "Dirt", "Caroline In The City", "Murphy Brown", "The Norm Show", "Grace Under Fire", "Home Improvement". Her solo album "East Of Midnight" was released in 2010.

Kelly Ripa

Kelly Ripa had been performing in her senior high school play, The Ugly Duckling, when she was approached by her current manager, Cathy Parker, who encouraged her to pursue acting. After attending new Jersey's Camden County Community College, she performed in local theater productions before joining All My Children in November, 1990. Kelly has received nominations for a 1993 Daytime Emmy Award and a 1993 Soap Opera Award. Kelly, is the first in her family to enter the acting profession. She had studied ballet since age three, plays the piano and, in her words, is "no Barbra Streisand", but can carry a tune.

Matt Dallas

Matthew Joseph "Matt" Dallas born October 21, 1982 is an American actor, best known for playing the title character on the ABC Family series Kyle XY. Dallas was born in Phoenix, Arizona, and attended Arizona School for the Arts. He has two younger brothers and one younger sister. He became interested in acting at the age of 12, when his grandmother took him to a production of the play The Ugly Duckling.

Jeanne Moreau

When people gave Louis Malle credit for making a star of Jeanne Moreau in Elevator to the Gallows immediately followed by The Lovers, he would point out that Moreau by that time had already been "recognized as the prime stage actress of her generation." She had made it to the Comédie Française in her 20s. She had appeared in B-movie thrillers with Jean Gabin and Ascenseur was in that genre. The technicians at the film lab went to the producer after seeing the first week of dailies for Ascenseur and said: "You must not let Malle destroy Jeanne Moreau". Malle explained: "She was lit only by the windows of the Champs Elysées. That had never been done. Cameramen would have forced her to wear a lot of make-up and they would put a lot of light on her, because, supposedly, her face was not photogenic". This lack of artifice revealed Moreau's "essential qualities: she could be almost ugly and then ten seconds later she would turn her face and would be incredibly attractive. But she would be herself".

Moreau has told interviewers that the characters she played were not her. But even the most famous film critic of his generation, Roger Ebert, thinks that she is a lot like her most enduring role, Catherine in François Truffaut's Jules and Jim. Behind those eyes and that enigmatic smile is a woman with a mind. In a review of The Clothes in the Wardrobe Ebert wrote: "Jeanne Moreau has been a treasure of the movies for 35 years... Here, playing a flamboyant woman who nevertheless keeps her real thoughts closely guarded, she brings about a final scene of poetic justice as perfect as it is unexpected".

Moreau made her debut as a director in Lumiere -- also writing the script and playing Sarah, an actress the same age as Moreau whose romances are often with directors for the duration of making a film. She made several films with Malle.

Still active in international cinema, Moreau presided over the jury of the 1995 Cannes Film Festival.

Susan Yeagley

Susan Yeagley was born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee. She began acting at age ten when she appeared in an Amy Grant music video.

She graduated from USC Film School with honors and went on to become a member of the prestigious 'Sunday Company - Groundlings Improv Group' where she performed sketch comedy and improv. It was during that stint that a casting director saw her perform and cast her in her first film role, Cameron Crowe's Almost Famous.

Susan's television credits include recurring roles on CBS's Rules of Engagement and FOX's Til Death. In addition, she has guest starred on ER, Friends, Reno 911, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Miracles, Ellen, Everybody Loves Raymond and The Sarah Silverman Program. Most recently, Susan portrayed "Jessica Wicks" on NBC's Parks and Recreation.

Her films credits include, the Coen brother's Intolerable Cruelty, Coyote Ugly, Neil Burger's The Lucky Ones and Frank Coraci's Blended.

Susan will next be seen in the Netflix original film Mascots from director Christopher Guest. A hilarious look into the world of competitive mascots, Susan stars alongside Guest's regulars, Parker Posey, Jennifer Coolidge, Fred Willard and Jane Lynch.

Veerle Baetens

Veerle Baetens studied Musical Theatre at the "Higher Institute of Dramatic Arts" in Brussels. After this she had roles in theatre and then started her TV career for VTM.

In 2005 she won the "John Kraaijkamp Musical Award" for her role in the theatre version of Pippi Longstocking. And in 2008 she won awards for her performance of "Sara" (the Flemish version of the TV show Ugly Betty). After this TV show ended she starred in the movie Loft. Then another big role came as Hannah Maes in the TV show "Code 37" where she played the tough police chief. This show lasted for 3 seasons.

In 2012 she started her own band together with friend Sandrine called "Dallas" and the album "Take it All" came out in 2012. Another album that Veerle was part of was the movie soundtrack of "The Broken Circle Breakdown" where she played the role of Elise, a woman who loses her daughter.

She and her boyfriend Geert have a daughter (2008) and live in Belgium.

Rain

Rain was born in Seoul, South Korea, on June 25, 1982 with the birth name Jung Jihoon. He was extremely shy in elementary school, stating in interviews that he barely spoke a word. He caught the desire to become a dancer when, at a school talent show in sixth grade, no one from his school stepped forward to dance so he gave it a try, imitating the moves he saw on TV. The applause was extremely gratifying and he decided on the spot to become a professional dancer. In order to learn, he sought out older street dancers, who sometimes helped him, sometimes bullied and beat him up. Rain and his younger sister, Hana, enjoyed a comfortable life until the Korean recession of 1997, when his father's mill and bakery businesses failed. Bankrupt, his father left for Brazil to pursue economic opportunities, leaving Rain's mother to try to support the family as a food vendor. Rain's mother was ailing from diabetes due to lack of money for medical care and insulin. Rain got a start in the entertainment business briefly as part of a six-member boy-band called Fanclub. Revealing abuses in the Korean entertainment industry, Rain described the Fanclub members as "caged animals" locked in the rehearsal room for up to ten hours without food. After Fanclub released only two CDs, the company promoting the band failed and Rain was back to square one. During his junior year of high school Rain lived with some of his dance group members, subsisting mostly on cups of ramen noodles. He auditioned eighteen times for entertainment companies but was told that, although he was talented, he was too ugly to become a star. He was told that he should have plastic surgery to create "double eyelids", a common Korean practice to obtain more western-looking eyes. Finally in 2000, he was accepted by JYP Entertainment as a trainee. CEO Park Jin Young, who put Rain through a grueling 3-4 hour audition, described Rain as "desperate" and "like a tiger who was about to starve to death" (2008 Discovery Channel documentary "Hip Korea"). JYP stipulated that Rain had to attend college so, after studying "ferociously," Rain got accepted to Kyunghee University and became a music major. Rain spent three years as a trainee and back-up dancer for JYP, who has stated that he was particularly critical of Rain in order to push him to be the best and keep him from "getting a swelled head." During Rain's time as a trainee, his family was living in poverty and his mother was becoming increasingly ill due to lack of money for medicine. Rain drove himself hard in order to prove himself ready to make his debut, but did not achieve success in time to save her life. She died from complications of diabetes a year before his debut. This event had a huge impact on Rain. He has said in interviews that he regrets having had conflict with her over skipping school to go to dance practice, and that he believes she is in heaven where she can see him. He says that a major motivation in his life is to make her proud and he still visits her grave before embarking on each new project. Another motivator Rain has mentioned is remembering what it was like to be hungry. He is a self-professed workaholic and after acting alongside him in Speed Racer, John Goodman called him "the hardest working man in show business."

Lynn Redgrave

Actress of both the English and American stage and screen, Lynn Redgrave was born in Marylebone, London, England, into one of the world's most famous acting dynasties. As the daughter of Rachel Kempson and Sir Michael Redgrave, sister of Vanessa Redgrave and Corin Redgrave, and granddaughter of Roy Redgrave and Margaret Scudamore, all of whom were actors, her early aspirations were surprisingly to become an equestrienne or a chef. It was not until the age of 15 that she became more and more involved in acting and her father's stage performances.

Attending London's Central School of Music and Drama, she made her stage debut in 1962 and began film work a year later. It wasn't until her lovable role as the ugly-duckling in Georgy Girl, that she was taken notice and, as a result, won both the Golden Globe, New York Film Critics Circle Award and a nomination for the coveted Best Actress at the 1967 Academy Awards. Despite this promising performance, Lynn struggled to find promising follow-up work, she played the lead in the fluffy Smashing Time and The Virgin Soldiers, low-key films that were relevant at the time of London's swinging 60s, but very quickly became largely forgotten. She married stage actor/director John Clark and her sister, Vanessa Redgrave, who was also Oscar-nominated the same year for Morgan!, was also gaining exposure and critical success if not surpassing Lynn, on both the British stage and films and was largely considered the leading face of England's breakout actresses of the '60s alongside 'Julie Christie' and other high-profile actresses.

Becoming the label of Vanessa Redgrave's younger and chubbier sister "that did that film a few years ago" didn't sit well with Lynn and, as a result, she lost considerable weight and permanently settled in the U.S. in 1974 to distance herself from this. Primarily based in southern California, she regularly commuted to New York and became notable particularly on the Broadway stage, and had successful runs in "Black Comedy/White Lies" (1967), "My Fat Friend" (1974), "Mrs. Warren's Profession" (1976), "Knock Knock" (1976), "Saint Joan" (1977-1978), "Aren't We All" (1985) and "Sweet Sue" (1987). She was prolifically hired by major networks to appear on a variety of TV talk and game shows and held the position of co-host for a few seasons of Not for Women Only, while acting on prime-time TV, whether it was guest spots, mini-series or short-lived TV series. For over 20 years, Redgrave's film career was infrequent and admittedly "terrible" by the actress herself, she notoriously played the title character in the critically-bashed, The Happy Hooker, and the all-star cast misfire, The Big Bus, and, in the 1980s, she focused in a different direction, becoming a spokesperson and commercial actress for "Weight Watches". This coincided with the release of her well- received book: "This Is Living: How I Found Health and Happiness", that detailed her weight issues and eating binges, it was also revealed that for years she suffered bulimia. In the mid-to-late '90s, Redgrave had somewhat of a resurgence in her career, from 1993-1994, she spent over 8 months on Broadway, as well as touring across the world, performing her own personally written show of "Shakespeare for My Father", that explored the bisexuality, aloof persona and intimidating resume of her father. In 1996, Scott Hicks reignited her film career after many years of inactivity by casting her in the Australian Oscar-winning hit, Shine, in which she gave a short yet tender performance as "Gillian", the woman Geoffrey Rush's character falls in love with. Another Golden Globe win/Oscar nomination followed (this time in the supporting category) for her role as the Hungarian housekeeper in Gods and Monsters. Her marriage abruptly ended in 1999, when infidelity was discovered on her husband's behalf and a nasty divorced followed, they produced three children Benjamin, Kelly Clark and Annabel Clark.

Continually working her way through film, television and stage performances in the '00s, recently awarded the OBE, Lynn Redgrave was shocked to discover lumps on her body and was diagnosed with breast cancer. As a result, she took time to write "Journal: A Mother and Daughter's Recovery from Breast Cancer" with her youngest daughter, Annabel Clark, in 2003 and tragically lost her 7-year battle on 2 May 2010 (aged 67) in her family home, surrounded by her loved ones. Her diagnosis led her to realize the beauty and simplicities of life, and she was quoted as saying: "there isn't any such thing as a bad day. Yes, bad things happen. But any day that I'm still here, able to feel and think and share things with people, then how could that possibly be a bad day?".

Sammy Davis Jr.

Sammy Davis Jr. was often billed as the "greatest living entertainer in the world".

He was born in Harlem, Manhattan, the son of dancer Elvera Davis (née Sanchez) and vaudeville star Sammy Davis Sr.. His father was African-American and his mother was of Puerto Rican ancestry. Davis Jr. was known as someone who could do it all--sing, dance, play instruments, act, do stand-up--and he was known for his self-deprecating humor; he once heard someone complaining about discrimination, and he said, "You got it easy. I'm a short, ugly, one-eyed, black Jew. What do you think it's like for me?" (he had converted to Judaism).

A short stint in the army opened his eyes to the evils of racism--a slight man, he was often beaten up by bigger white soldiers and given the dirtiest and most dangerous assignments by white officers simply because he was black--and he helped break down racial barriers in show business in the 1950s and 1960s, especially in Las Vegas, where he often performed; when he started there in the early 1950s, he was not allowed to stay in the hotels he played in, as they refused to take blacks as customers. He also stirred up a large amount of controversy in the 1960s by openly dating, and ultimately marrying, blonde, blue-eyed, Swedish-born actress May Britt.

He starred in the Broadway musical "Golden Boy" in the 1960s. Initially a success, internal tensions, production problems and bad reviews--many of them directed at Davis for playing a role originally written for a white man--resulted in its closing fairly quickly. His film and nightclub career were in full swing, however, and he became even more famous as one of the "Rat Pack", a group of free-wheeling entertainers that included Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Joey Bishop and Peter Lawford.

A chain smoker, Davis died from throat cancer at the age of 64. When he died, he was in debt. To pay for Davis' funeral, most of his memorabilia was sold off.

Kurt Fuller

Kurt Fuller is best known for his work in the films Wayne's World with Mike Myers, Anger Management, with Jack Nicholson and Adam Sandler, and most recently as part of the all star cast of Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris.

Kurt was born in San Francisco and raised in the agricultural heartland of California's San Joaquin Valley. He became passionate about acting while attending UC Berkley, where he received a degree in English literature. After graduating, Kurt made the move to Los Angeles with everything he owned stuffed into the back of a 1967 Dodge Dart (including a king size foam rubber mattress). For the next ten years he was a Realtor by day and a stage actor by night. Then, in 1986, he created the leading role of "Frank" in Steven Berkoff's explosively successful Kvetch, earning rave reviews on both coasts.

Kurt has worked with Hollywood's best directors, including David O. Russell, Shawn Levy, Paul Schrader, Tony Scott, Wim Wenders, Taylor Hackford, Mike Newell, Harold Ramis, Brian De Palma and Ivan Reitman. His numerous film credits include Auto Focus, Ray, Pushing Tin, The Jack Bull, Scary Movie, Ghostbusters II, Mr. Woodcock, Nailed and _The Pursuit of Happyness_ (2006).

This Fall Kurt will appear as "Michael", opposite Jane Kaczmarek, in Fox's new comedy _"Us and Them"_. His most recent series was the ABC's 2011 comedy, Better With You. He also had series regular roles ABC's Big Day, in which he starred with Wendie Malick, and That's My Bush!, the television series from South Park & "The Book of Mormon" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. He has recurred and guest starred on over a hundred TV shows and telefilms over the years. Over the last year, Kurt has had recurring characters on many hit series including Parenthood, The Good Wife, Scandal and Psych (playing the lovable coroner Woody). In the past, Kurt has had arcs on, Supernatural, Desperate Housewives, Boston Legal, and Alias.

His other TV appearances include HBO's Live From Baghdad, with Michael Keaton, as well as hit shows such as Glee, _"Ugly Betty"_ (2006), CSI, Men of a Certain Age, Grey's Anatomy, House, My Name is Earl, Monk, and Drop Dead Diva.

Kurt still returns to the stage occasionally, his most recent theater work was The Cosmonaut's Last Message at the La Jolla Playhouse, and the highly acclaimed The Waiting Room at the Mark Taper Forum.

Kurt has been married to wife Jessica Hendra, a recently published author, since 1994. They have two children; Julia and Charlotte.

Margaret Cho

Margaret Cho was born Dec. 5, 1968 and raised in San Francisco. Her grandfather was a Methodist minister who ran an orphanage in Seoul during the Korean War. Ignoring the traditions of her patriarchal culture, her mother bravely resisted an arranged marriage in Korea and married Margaret's father who writes joke books - in Korean.

What Margaret did know is that she didn't love being a kid. Racing toward adulthood to escape bullying, she began writing jokes for stand up at 14 and professionally performing at age 16. Getting picked on, and feeling disenfranchised, is a subject that's very near to Margaret's heart. She has become a sort of "Patron Saint" for Outsiders, speaking for them when they are not able to speak for themselves.

Soon after starting her Stand Up career, Margaret won a comedy contest where first prize was opening for Jerry Seinfeld. She moved to Los Angeles in the early '90s and, still in her early twenties, hit the college circuit, where she immediately became the most booked act in the market and garnered a nomination for "Campus Comedian of The Year." She performed over 300 concerts within two years. Arsenio Hall introduced her to late night audiences, Bob Hope put her on a prime time special and, seemingly overnight, Margaret Cho became a national celebrity.

Her groundbreaking, controversial, and short-lived ABC sitcom, All-American Girl (1994) soon followed. Oddly, while chosen because of who she was-a non-conformist Korean American woman with liberal views-the powers-that-be then decided they wanted her to "tone it down" for the show. Challenging Margaret's feelings for both who she was and how she looked, she soon realized that though she was an Executive Producer, it was a battle she would not win.

The experience was a traumatic one, bringing up unresolved feelings left over from childhood, and Margaret developed an eating disorder as a response to criticism about her body. She was so obsessive in her goal to try to be what she thought others wanted, she landed in the hospital with kidney failure. Through out a period of self-abuse, Margaret continued performing to sold-out audiences across the country in comedy clubs, theaters, and on college campuses, working to channel her anger in to something more positive.

In 1999, her groundbreaking, off Broadway one-woman show, I'm The One That I Want, toured the country to national acclaim and was made into a best-selling book and feature film of the same name. After her experience with All-American Girl, Margaret wanted to make sure she would only have to answer to herself, making sure she was responsible for the distribution and sales of her film, taking a page from what music artist Ani DiFranco did with her Righteous Babe Records. The concert film, which garnered incredible reviews, broke records for most money grossed per print in movie history. In 2001, after the success of her first tour, Cho launched Notorious C.H.O., a smash-hit 37-city national tour that culminated in a sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall. Notorious C.H.O. was recorded and released as a feature film, hailed by the New York Times as "Brilliant!" Both films were acquired by Showtime Cable Networks, and produced by Margaret's production company, a testament to the success of Margaret's bold business model.

In March of 2003, Margaret embarked on her third sold-out national tour, Revolution. It was heralded by the Chicago Sun Times as "Her strongest show yet!" and the CD recording was nominated for a Grammy for Comedy Album of the Year. In 2005, Cho released Assassin, which The Chicago Tribune crowed "Packs passion in to each punch." The concert film premiered in select theaters and on the gay and lesbian premium channel Here! TV in late 2005.

In 2007, Margaret hit the road with Cyndi Lauper, Debbie Harry and Erasure, along with indie faves The Dresden Dolls and The Cliks, to host the True Colors Tour, benefiting the Human Rights Campaign. A true entertainment pioneer, Margaret also created and starred in The Sensuous Woman, a live variety show featuring vaudevillian burlesque and comedy, which she took for an extended off-Broadway run in the fall.

Margaret returned to TV in 2008 on the VH1 series, The Cho Show. The Cho Show followed Margaret, her real parents, and her eccentric entourage through a series of irreverent and outrageous experiences, shaped by Margaret's 'anything goes' brand of stand-up. It was beloved for the audience it was intended for, the ones who maybe don't quite fit in, who knew Margaret is one of them.

The aptly titled Beautiful came next, exploring the good, bad and ugly in beauty, and the unattractive politicians and marketers who shape our world. The concert premiered in Australia at The Sydney Theater, marking the first time Margaret debuted a tour abroad. While touring through the US, the concert was filmed at the Long Beach theatre, aired as a special on Showtime in 2009, and then released as both a DVD and a book.

In 2009 Margaret nabbed a starring role in the comedy/drama series Drop Dead Diva, airing on Lifetime. Margaret enjoys being part of a team, and not necessarily having the sole responsibility for keeping things afloat.

Never one to shy away from a challenge, Margaret stepped right up to the proverbial plate when asked to do Season 11 of the #1 rated Dancing with the Stars. Paired with pro Louie Van Amstel, Margaret was on one of the show's most controversial seasons, dancing alongside Mike "The Situation" Sorrentino, David Hasselhoff, Jennifer Grey and Bristol Palin among others.

Margaret got a very strong reaction to her Rainbow Dancing Dress during a time when the issue of bullying, especially among gay teens, was all over the media.

2010 culminated with another high honor, a second Grammy Award nomination for Comedy Album of the Year for Cho Dependent, her incredibly funny collection of music featuring collaborations with Fiona Apple, Andrew Bird, Grant Lee Phillips, Tegan & Sara, Ben Lee and more. The album received critical acclaim.

Margaret self released Cho Dependent on her own Clownery Records, and was encouraged by the acclaim, as there are only a handful of people putting out albums of comedy music - "Weird" Al Yankovic, Flight of the Conchords, The Lonely Island, to name a few - but no women. While thrilled that her hard work was rewarded with the nomination, Margaret isn't finished with musical comedy yet, claiming to have more music in her.

In 2011, Margaret released the live concert film of Cho Dependent, which also had its cable network debut on Showtime. Audiences who caught these performances live can attest that Cho hasn't lost any of her edge on Cho Dependent, her sixth live concert DVD. Shot at the Tabernacle in Atlanta, GA, Cho remains uncensored, but never unhinged, taking aim at the Palin family, her stint on Dancing With the Stars, smoking pot and living in a world with 'sexting.' The DVD is characteristically no-holds-barred Margaret and instantly a classic.

Margaret is currently filming the sixth and final season on Drop Dead Diva. Cho returns as "Teri" Girl Friday to Brooke Elliott's "Jane Bingham," whose body is inhabited by the soul of a vapid model sent back to earth after Heaven judges her as a "zero-zero" for having committed no good and no bad deeds. Drop Dead Diva is not only beloved on Lifetime, but by the many stars who have queued up to guest on the show, including Paula Abdul, Wanda Sykes, Rosie O'Donnell, Vivica Fox and Kim Kardashian.

Not one to rest on her laurels, Margaret spent whatever free time she had crafting her all new stand-up show, the uproariously and aptly named Mother, which kicked off in September, 2012, including both a US and European tour.

Paradox not lost, Margaret had to re-schedule some of the shows she had booked mid-September so she could attend the Emmy Awards with her mother. Nominated for a Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series for her hilarious stint on 30 Rock as gender-bending North Korean leader Kim Jong Il.

In 2014, Margaret filmed a pilot for FOX and was thrilled to be working with Tina Fey and the producing team from 30 Rock. The multi-camera comedy takes place at a women's college that has just opened its doors to men for the first time.

While thrilled with her two Grammy and recent Emmy nod, Margaret has never turned away from the causes that are important to her. She is incredibly active in anti-racism, anti-bullying and gay rights campaigns, and has been recognized for her unwavering dedication. She was the recipient of the Victory Fund's 2008 Leadership Award and the first ever Best Comedy Performance Award at the 2007 Asian Excellence Awards. She also received the First Amendment Award from the ACLU of Southern California, and the Intrepid Award from the National Organization for Women (NOW). Throughout her career, she has been honored by GLAAD, American Women in Radio and Television, the Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF), the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF), and PFLAG for making a significant difference in promoting equal rights for all, regardless of race, sexual orientation or gender identity. In June of 2011, Margaret was honored by LA Pride, receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award, recognizing an individual whose lifetime body of work has left a lasting major imprint on the LGBT community.

Through her hard work, Margaret has had the opportunity to be heard, to extend her point of view and become regarded as a true pioneer in her field. She takes none of it for granted.

Bobb'e J. Thompson

Kicking off an impressive career in front of the camera at the tender age of five, Bobb'e J. Thompson rose to fame as a child actor well before his teens, initially with a small but colorful and energetic supporting role as the pint-sized Tupac in My Baby's Daddy (2003). He subsequently appeared in television and film efforts such as "The Tracy Morgan Show" (2004), Shark Tale (2004), "That's So Raven" (2004), and "Joey" (2005). Thompson contributed to OutKast mainstay Bryan Barber's offbeat, inventive musical drama Idlewild (2006), before teaming up with Vince Vaughn in the holiday comedy Fred Claus (2007). Thompson then starred in the acerbic farce hit comedy Role Models as the hilarious, wisecracking Ronnie Shields, for which he was nominated for Best Breakthrough Performance - Male at the 2009 MTV Movie Awards.

2009 is proving to be a break out year for Thompson. He appeared in Land of the Lost with Will Ferrell and the family comedy Imagine That, in which he plays a junior extortionist that hazes Eddie Murphy. Thompson is also a semi-regular on NBC's "30 Rock," stealing scenes and showing perfect comic timing in his role as Tracy Jr., the son of Tracy Morgan's character. Not stopping, Nike recruited Thompson for multiple commercials as the fast-talking Lil Dez, who gives NBA greats Kobe Bryant and LeBron James a run for their money while babysitting.

Alongside his film work, Thompson culled favorable attention for his prominent contributions to the youth-oriented urban dance video JammX Kids: Can't Dance Don't Want To, which afforded him the opportunity to show off his flair for urban music and footwork.

Up next for Thompson is Snowmen with Ray Liotta and a hosting gig on the Cartoon Network show Bobb'e Says.

Additionally, Reveille has entered into a talent holding deal with the 13-year-old. Reveille's first project with Thompson will be a half-hour scripted comedy. Reveille is a leading independent television studio with a major presence in scripted and unscripted television and digital entertainment. Reveille's scripted entertainment programming includes "The Office" (NBC), "Ugly Betty" (ABC), "The Tudors" (Showtime), and many more.

Tom Verica

Tom has an illustrious career that spans thirty years in the entertainment industry. A gifted actor and director, he is a true multi-hyphenate. Currently, he serves as the Executive Producer/Head Director of Scandal on ABC and steps in front of the camera to act opposite Viola Davis as her husband, Sam Keating, in another ABC-Shonda Rhimes hit, How To Get Away With Murder. Prior to Verica's full schedule as one of Shondaland's busiest players, Tom starred as Jack Pryor on NBC's acclaimed television drama, American Dreams, in which the Wall Street Journal declared the "versatile actor's performance a marvel." Tom's diverse feature film acting credits include Zodiac helmed by David Fincher, Flags Of Our Fathers directed by Clint Eastwood, Murder By Numbers, Red Dragon, Father's Day, and Die Hard II.

Among his extensive television appearances as an actor, Tom has starred on The Naked Truth opposite Tea Leoni, LA Law, Central Park West, The Nine and HBO's Emmy-winning, mini-series From The Earth To The Moon in which he portrayed astronaut Dick Gordon. Other highlights include stints on notable television shows such as House, The Closer, Grey's Anatomy, Law & Order SVU, Medium, Frasier, Will & Grace, Providence, The 4400, and the famous 'conversion' episode of Seinfeld. In theatre, Tom has performed on and Off-Broadway in numerous stage plays including the award-winning Broadway production of Craig Lucas' Prelude To A Kiss at the Helen Hayes Theatre.

As a well-regarded director, Tom has helmed numerous episodes of television including Scandal, Grey's Anatomy, The Mentalist, Harry's Law, Private Practice, Boston Legal, Ugly Betty and American Dreams. He is a DGA member that currently serves on the Television Creative Rights Committee. He is married to writer, Kira Arne', and they have two children.

Jack Noseworthy

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Jack received his BFA from The Boston Conservatory. He began his career on stage in the national tour of the musical CATS. He made his Broadway debut in the original company of JEROME ROBBINS BROADWAY, played Mark in A CHORUS LINE, and opposite John Lithgow in SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS. In addition to his New York stage work, he received the Los Angeles Drama Critics prize and a Drama-Logue Award as Best Actor for his starring role as Alan Strang in the Los Angeles production of EQUUS. He stared as Pip in the Utah Shake's production of GREAT EXPECTATIONS as well as Mr. Charles Bingley, in PRIDE & PREJUDICE.

In January of 2017 he guest stared on "Shades Of Blue" opposite Ray Liotta, and is currently shooting the independent feature "Band Night". Jack played Alan deShields in the Lifetime miniseries "Marilyn". He played Bobby Kennedy in NatGeo's highest rated film, "Killing Kennedy" opposite Rob Lowe and Ginnifer Goodwin. He has completed the features"10,000 Miles", "Julia" "Needlestick" and "Tio Papi". He played "Mordred" in CAMELOT opposite Nathan Gunn at The Glimmerglass Festival, and recently shot the web pilot, IN PLAIN VIEW. He received rave reviews as Elliot in "Two Point Oh" Jeff Jackson's new play off Broadway at 59E59th St. in NYC, as well as narrating the Christopher Wheeldon Ballet, "Carnival Of The Animals" for NYCB.

In the motion picture arena, he has worked with Jonathan Mostow five times, most recently in the Bruce Willis action thriller "The Surrogates", as well as, "Breakdown," "U-571," the FOX Network's pilot "Them" and his cameo in "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines". Jack's other feature film credits include the independent favorites, "Pretty Ugly People" and "Phat Girlz," as well as, "Undercover Brother," "Poster Boy," "Unconditional Love," "Event Horizon," "The Brady Bunch Movie," "Barb Wire," "Trigger Effect," "Cecil B. DeMented," "Alive" and "Encino Man," his movie debut.

On television: the Hallmark-Hall-Of-Fame western "Aces 'N Eights" "ELVIS" opposite Jonathan Rhys Meyers, played Sissy Spacek's son in "A Place For Annie," and Anne Bancroft's obsession in "Mrs. Cage." Other television credits include: "Shades Of Blue" "CSI," "The District," "Law & Order," "Law & Order: SVU," "Crossing Jordan" and "Judging Amy" (four episodes). He also has the distinction of being the series lead on MTV's first scripted series, "Dead At 21."

In March of 2016, Jack produced "Arrabal" at the Bi-Annual Ibero American Theatre Festival in Bogota, Colombia. "Arrabal" begins rehearsals in Cambridge, Ma at American Repertory Theatre on April 3rd, 2017. It opens on May 12th and runs thru June 18th. He previously optioned and produced "Peter & I" by Matte O'Brien and Matt Vinson. Jack created, directed and produced three benefits under the Voices For Change banner at Ars Nova, for John Kerry's presidential campaign.

Chris Williams

An extremely versatile performer in film, television and on stage, Chris is no stranger to the entertainment arena both on and off camera in both comedy and drama.

Film credits include the "The World's Fastest Indian" playing Tina, a transvestite opposite Sir Anthony Hopkins "The Joneses" opposite Demi Moore as well as a lead in the classic comedy "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story". Other credits include "The Lottery Ticket" "Friday After Next", "Sex Ed", "'TRI" and "Jimmy Vestvood American Hero".

As for television, he can be seen starring in the new CBS series "The Great Indoors" and is recurring on the the FX show "Better Things", the and as Hoover on "Silicon Valley". Chris was a series regular in the NBC "One Big Happy" and on David E. Kelley's series "The Wedding Bells" for FOX and has recurred on the Showtime series "DICE" starring Andrew Dice Clay,"Satisfaction", "Californication", while making his mark as 'Krazee Eyez Killa' on "Curb Your Enthusiasm". He has guest starred on Ugly Betty, CSI: Miami, Hot in Cleveland, Monk, Weeds, and numerous other shows. Chris had also appeared multiple times on Late Night with David Letterman as the angry audience member and has an upcoming self help show "Be a Better Man with Chris Williams" which he created, stars in and produces. Chris has also lent his vocal talents to such animated series as The Boondocks and Word Girl and can be heard on several video games including multiple characters in Crash Bandicoot.

Chris is a successful stand-up, he has performed at several top comedy clubs around the world including: Caesar's Palace, The Improv, The Comedy Store and The Venetian. His innovative routines are included in his character-rich one-man show "Old Blue Eyes Is Black" while also having studied with the Groundlings.

Chris has been coaching other professional actors the craft of scene work as well as improvisation for over 15 years and speaks to children across the nation about the art of performing.

A graduate of Georgetown University, he is a magician's member of the Academy of Magical Arts (The Magic Castle) and when not practicing as a 3rd degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do or running marathons to raise money for the American Diabetes Association and Eye Bank of New York, he is a board member of the charity Special Kids Network. Chris divides his time between Los Angeles and New York.

Mark Indelicato

Mark Indelicato is best known for his pivotal role as 'Justin Suarez' in the hit ABC series "Ugly Betty." He was most recently seen in Gregg Araki's film "White Bird in a Blizzard," co-starring opposite Gabourey Sidibe and Shailene Woodley.

After his four seasons on "Ugly Betty," Indelicato decided to take a break from acting to study International Relations and Gender Studies at NYU Gallatin and has been living in New York City for the last four years. During his time at NYU, Indelicato's studies led him to a semester-long internship at the Clinton Global Initiative.

Yo-Landi Visser

Anri du Toit, goes by her rap name Yo-Landi VI$$ER. She was born in Port Alfred, a small town on the East coast of South Africa, and was adopted as a baby by an Afrikaans family. Her dad was a priest and her mom was a housewife. She has never met her birth parents. Visser grew up very rebellious, often getting into fistfights, and was sent to boarding school when she was 16 years old, in Pretoria. In 2003, Visser moved to Cape Town and met Ninja (real name Watkin Tudor Jones, born in 1975.) She started rapping with Ninja and found a passion for performing thugged-out, "zef" rap music. In 2007, Visser and Ninja started planning a group together. Later, adding members Hi-Tek and DJ they formed the Zef-Rave-Rapper band, Die Antwoord and put out a couple of songs and their first album $O$. In 2006, Visar got pregnant and later had a daughter, Sixteen Jones. Though they never got married, Visser and Ninja have always remained very close. In 2009 Visser wanted to change her image, so she would look on the outside how she felt on the inside. She fulfilled that goal by having Ninja cut off the sides of her hair and then she bleached her hair and eyebrows white. This was a statement of her outsider pride, "an unmissable declaration of who she is and what she stands for." In February 2010 their video "Enter the Ninja" that featured Visser as a cyberpunk schoolgirl heroine, wearing underwear with marker-emblazoned dollar signs, and a rat crawling over her went viral. And in 2014, their "Ugly Boy" video had cameos by Marilyn Manson, Flea, the ATL Twins, Jack Black, Dita Von Teese and supermodel Cara Delevingne. In 2010, David Fincher reached out to Visser about playing the lead in his adaptation of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, but Visser said no, because she didn't want to loose focus on her music. The role eventually went to Rooney Mara. At the same time, Ninja was considering a film offer from Neill Blomkamp to star in Elysium, but Visser talked Ninja out of it and that role went to Matt Damon.

In 2012, Die Antwoord released their album Ten$ion on their own label, Zef Recorz. They received an offer to open for Lady Gaga, but declined.

When South African director Blomkamp was writing the script for Chappie he had Visser and Ninja in mind from the beginning and approached them to do the movie. He presented them with the fact that he wanted them to play themselves and had used the couple's existing personas as a starting point for his script. This went over well with the couple and their performances were a huge hit with the producers, who were skeptical at first. Now Visser and Ninja want to do a TV show about their Zef lives.

Lisa Joyce

Born and raised in Chicago, Lisa Joyce received her BFA in Acting from the Theater School at DePaul University. She received a Joseph Jefferson nomination for her performance in Adam Rapp's "Red Light Winter", which premiered at the Steppenwolf Theater Company before transferring off-Broadway and being named a finalist for The Pulitzer Prize.

Lisa made her West End/Broadway debut in "La Bete", starring Mark Rylance and David Hyde Pierce, and toured nationally, alongside Cherry Jones in the Tony Award-winning production of "Doubt".

Some of her favorite off-Broadway credits include: Nora Ephron and Delia Ephron's beloved production of "Love, Loss and What I Wore" and Soho Rep.'s "The Ugly One", for which she earned a Drama Desk nomination. Lisa has also appeared in productions at The Public, New York Theater Workshop, The Signature, Classic Stage Company, Rattlestick, Transport Group, StageFARM, Williamstown and The Studio Theater in D.C., where she received a Helen Hayes Award for her role in "Blackbird". Lisa is a member of the LAByrinth Theater Company.

Grant Bowler

Grant Bowler can be seen as the male lead, 'Nolan', in Syfy's Defiance, which returned for its second season, June 2014. Bowler in his recent hiatus shot four movies back-to-back including the psychological action film, "Swelter", alongside Jean Claude Van Damme & Alfred Molina, Sci-Fi thriller "400 Days" with Brandon Routh and Dane Cook, "Lucky Dog" with Amy Smart and the family movie, "Zooey to the Max".

Bowler was last seen on the small screen as 'Richard Burton' in Lifetime's television movie Liz & Dick, and had a widely popular turn as 'Cooter' in the award winning vampire franchise True Blood on HBO. He is perhaps best known for his work as recurring character 'Connor Owens' on Ugly Betty and as 'Captain Gault' in TV blockbuster Lost.

Born in New Zealand and raised in Australia, he is a graduate of the esteemed Australian drama school NIDA, alongside other notable graduates including Mel Gibson, Cate Blanchett and Sam Worthington.

Prior to basing himself in Los Angeles, Grant carried many successful Australian TV roles including dramas Blue Heelers, Pacific Drive, All Saints, Something In The Air, as well as starring in the mini-series Through My Eyes about the disappearance of Azaria Chamberlin, Lindy Chamberlin's baby and the Australian TV movie The Great Mint Swindle. He's also been seen in the widely viewed NZ crime drama Outrageous Fortune, where he was nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the 2010 Qantas Film and Television Awards. 2012 saw Bowler add an International Emmy win to his list of career accomplishments.

Bipasha Basu

Fate intervened when Bipasha recoiled and passed out when dissecting a rat. Thus ended her dream of being a medical professional. She was enrolled in the science faculty until 12th standard, but switched to commerce thereafter. After acquiring a degree in commerce she planned to be a chartered accountant but ended up being the Ford Supermodel of the World when she was just 17 years old.

Bipasha was born on January 7th 1979 in New Delhi. subsequently the Basu family re-located to Calcutta. Bipasha is the second of three sisters, born and brought up in a Hindu Bengali family, she is fluent in Hindi, English, and Bengali. The names of her sisters are Bidisha and Bijoyeta. Unbelievable as it may sound, sexy Bipasha was considered 'ugly' in her younger years due to her dark complexion. Her name means 'Dark Deep Desire', and is also the name of a river.

After her triumph as the Ford Supermodel, she went on to be crowned Miss Vivacious sponsored by Tulips.

Bipasha made her foray into Bollywood with Ajnabee in 2001, and subsequently acquired a place for herself in the tinsel world. She went to star in Raaz, Jism, No Entry, Phir Hera Pheri, Corporate & Dhoom 2. All of these movies did fairly well at the box office, and escalated her position as not only a leading lady, but one who can dare to bare. Dhoom 2 also credits her as a playback singer.

She has also appeared in two music videos, and was one of the judges in the 2004 Femina Miss India beauty pageant.

Robert Helpmann

Son of James Murray Helpmann & Mary (nee Gardiner), he was educated at Prince Alfred's College, Adelaide, South Australia. He first danced solo at the Theatre Royal, Adelaide in The Ugly Duckling in 1922. He went on to become the pricipal dancer at Sadlers Wells ballet from 1933 to 1950. World renowned as a dancer and choreographer, amongst his other achievements he was the director of the Australian Ballet Company. He directed the world tour of Margot Fonteyn in 1963.

Derek Riddell

After completing a BA in business studies at the University of Strathclyde, in his home city of Glasgow, he went on to train at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art and has worked extensively in theatre film and television in both the UK and the USA Having first come to prominence in Channel 4's cult hit "The Book Group" ,he has since had recurring roles in many well known, much loved and award winning series such as "Happy Valley", " Undercover" ,"The Village", "Frankie", "No Angels" and "Clocking Off" In the US he starred alongside Lily Taylor in Lifetime's 'State of Mind' and is also known for the role of Stuart in series 2 and 3 of ABC's "Ugly Betty"

David Blue

The youngest of three boys, David Blue grew up as the comedian of the family. A lifelong actor, singer and dancer, Blue spent years performing onstage. He eventually graduated from the conservatory at the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in both Acting and Musical Theatre Performance. Following an Acting Apprenticeship at the world-renowned Actor's Theatre of Louisville, he made the move to Los Angeles.

Appearances all across the dial soon followed, including CW's hit series "Veronica Mars," FX's "Dirt" and many others. But one of David's best-known roles was as Cliff St. Paul on ABC's hit "Ugly Betty." His work on which inspired a submission for a possible Emmy Nomination. Concurrently, Blue joined the cast of CBS' "Moonlight" as technology-obsessed vampire Logan Griffen. During his second season of "Ugly Betty", Blue was announced as eventual fan-favorite Eli Wallace in Syfy's "SGU Stargate Universe", opposite Robert Carlyle.

A seasoned vocalist, Blue has performed onstage with many talents, including Dick Van Dyke and Victor Garber. He starred in the re-imagining of Howard Ashman's "Dreamstuff", headlining alongside Fred Willard, Vicki Lewis, and Eden Espinosa. He still enjoys returning to the stage between television and film projects, as he did recently with a performance as Feste in Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night."

Meital Dohan

Meital is an award-winning actress in theater, film, and television; including two Israeli Oscar nominations and an Israeli Tony award. In Israel she was part of major productions such as Ugly Betty, Romeo and Juliet, Dancing with the Stars and many more. US audiences were first introduced to Meital in her breakout role as Yael Hoffman on Showtime's Weeds, Aurora in the Sony Pictures web-comedy Woke Up Dead, Foreclosure with Michael Imperioli, Monogamy with Chris Messina and Rashida Jones (Winner of Best Narrative Feature at the Tribeca Film Festival) and many more. Her short and full of achievement music career started just a few years ago and includes only three songs so far, receiving rave reviews and charting in many charts around the world including the top five at iTunes Dance Chart Italy, UK Commercial Pop Club, Billboard Dance Chart, Billboard Club Chart, UK Upfront Club Chart and more.

Ken Osmond

Forever tagged as the unctuous, trouble-making truant Eddie Haskell on the quintessential 50s family show Leave It to Beaver, actor Ken Osmond did not manage much of a career after the stereotype. So inextricably typed was he that he gave up on any semblance of a career within a short time after the series' cancellation. Unlike so many other tragic child stars who did not survive the transition into adulthood, Osmond's life remained quite balanced. It did not careen out of control or disintegrate into alcohol and drugs.

Ken was born on June 3, 1943 in Glendale, California, and started appearing on film and TV prior to his sitcom success thanks to a typically insistent stage mother. Taking up athletic skills such as fencing and martial arts as well as diction classes, Ken and his brother Dayton Osmond made their film debuts as child extras in the Mayflower pilgrim tale Plymouth Adventure starring Spencer Tracy. Other minor tyke film roles came for Osmond with So Big, Good Morning, Miss Dove and Everything But the Truth. He went on to appear in the popular shows of the day including "Circus Boy," "Annie Oakley" and "Lassie." Both public and studio schooled, Ken nabbed the key role of Eddie Haskell at age 14. With his tight, curly blond locks, ugly sneer and intimidating stance, he became an instant sensation on the show, delightfully smudging up the squeaky-clean Cleaver name on occasion with his nasty antics. As the two-faced buddy of teenager Wally Cleaver, Eddie was forever brown-nosing the Cleaver parents ("You look lovely today, Mrs. Cleaver!") while showing his true colors bullying poor Beaver (nicknaming him "squirt") or goading Wally on to break some family rule or curfew. A certifiable radar for trouble, he was the resident scene-stealer for six seasons until the show's demise in 1963, when things went downhill quickly. In retrospect, a spinoff show starring the Eddie Haskell character could have been something to consider; however, Osmond as a 20-year-old juvenile delinquent (his age when the show ended) might have been hard to swallow.

Osmond struggled badly in its aftermath. After a hitch in the Army, he grabbed a few TV remnants that came his way on such lightweight comedy shows as "The Munsters" and "Petticoat Junction." Following a minor role in the youth-oriented flick C'mon, Let's Live a Little starring pop singers Bobby Vee and Jackie DeShannon, Osmond pretty much called it quits. He subsequently made a very un-Eddie-like career choice by joining the Los Angeles Police Department. He grew a mustache to help secure his anonymity. A long-time member of its vice squad, he was wounded three times during the line of duty, eventually retired and earned a medical disability pension from the police force.

In the 1980s, Ken came back to TV with a reunion mini-movie and then a cable-revived version of "Leave It to Beaver" entitled The New Leave It to Beaver, which featured Barbara Billingsley, Tony Dow, Frank Bank and Jerry Mathers from the original 1950s cast. The series revolved around the boys all married now, having kids and faced with grown-up problems. Ken's real-life offspring Christian Osmond and Eric Osmond played his impish sons on the series, Eddie Jr. and Freddie. A full-length film version of Leave It to Beaver had Osmond turning back once again to the show, this time as the father of his infamous role. Ken still makes personal appearances occasionally at film festivals, collectors' shows and nostalgia conventions. Married to wife Sandy since 1970, he has kept fairly prosperous handling rental properties in the Los Angeles area. His brother Dayton later became a special effects supervisor for the TV show "Babylon 5."

Bonnie Dennison

Bonnie was born in New York City and attended the UN International School and NYU. In addition to guest appearances on NBC's "Law & Order", "Law & Order: SVU", CBS's "The Education of Max Bickford" with Richard Dreyfuss, Sidney Lumet's "100 Centre Street"on A&E and ABC's "Ugly Betty", Bonnie was a member of the cast of NBC's "Third Watch" as well as CBS's "Guiding Light". Her film work has included "Black Irish" with Michael Angarano and "Stake Land" with Connor Paolo, due out in 2010. Off Broadway, Bonnie starred in David Rabe's Hurlyburly and recently made her Broadway debut as Scarlett Johansson's understudy in Arthur Miller's A View From the Bridge. Bonnie's sister is photographer Sally Dennison, also a New York native.

Erin Fitzgerald

Erin Fitzgerald is a Canadian and American actress and voice actress. Fitzgerald is bilingual, speaking both English and French fluently. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, she has resided in Los Angeles, California since 2000.

She is theater trained having graduated from the University of Victoria's Phoenix Theaters acting program and has performed shows such as School for Scandal, A Country Wife, Macbeth, See Bob Run, Cabaret as well as performing from 1997-1998 in the Vancouver, Canada production of Tony & Tina's wedding playing Connie and Tina. She also studied Improv with the Groundlings in Los Angeles.

On stage, Fitzgerald currently works with the comedy troupe "Fake Radio", performing 1940s radio plays and shows live at the Steve Allen Theater Hollywood, in authentic costumes. She is best known for her voice over roles of May Kanker and Nazz in Cartoon Network's classic original series Ed, Edd n Eddy. Fitzgerald can currently be heard on the Mattel series Ever After High on Netflix, as Raven Queen, C.A. Cupid, Gus Crumb & The Ugly Stepsisters. On Mattel's Emmy Nominated Monster High series, which airs specials on Nickelodeon and Netflix.

Erin is the original voices of Abbey Bominable, Spectra Vondergeist, Rochelle Goyle, Claire (no doll), Fawn (no doll), Wydowna Spider, C.A. Cupid, Scarah Screams (2011-2014) & Astranova. Fitzgerald can also be heard on Nicktoons series Wild Grinders, as well as Lego Friends, Kate and Mim Mim, Jungle Bunch, Popples, and Miraculous Ladybug,

Fitzgerald is also very well known for working on video games, which include World of Warcraft: Warlords of Draenor, The Last of Us, Bravely Default, Danganronpa, League of Legends; Skullgirls the Annie Award 2012 Nominated game for 'Best Animated Video Game' where she voices Parasoul and the IGN, Games Radar, Destructoid, Gametrailers, & SPIKE TV VGA (Video Game Awards) 2012 "Best Fighting Game" winner Persona 4: Arena in which Erin voices Chie Satonaka.

Fernando Colunga

Fernando Colunga was born on the 3rd of March 1966 in Mexico City, Mexico. His father is Don Fernando Colunga and his mother Dona Margarita Olivares. Fernando Colunga from the time that was a little boy wanted to be an actor. Fernando graduated from the University of Mexico as civil engineer. But after advice from a friend, Fernando went to the studios of Televisa, the best studios for the well-known and successful in telenovelas. Fernando started his career as a stand-in. A producer noticed his great acting talent and from then the excellent acting career of Fernando begun.

His first participation in the television was with the telenovela _"María Mercedes" (1992)_ (qv. The role of Fernando in this telenovela was originally made for 10 episodes, but after the huge success that his role had, the producers made 80 more episodes with Fernando Colunga. From then onwards, he acted in many telenovelas like Marimar before he took his first leading role. His first leading role was in the telenovela _"María la del Barrio" (1996)_, which was very successful. Right after this telenovela, Fernando took his second leading role in the telenovela Esmeralda that made him very famous not only in Mexico but in 170 countries of the world where the telenovela has been shown. Fernando became a huge TV-star with big ratings and millions of fans.

In 1998 Fernando filmed La usurpadora, a telenovela that had a huge rating in Mexico and in all over the world. In 1999 Fernando continued his bright career with Nunca te olvidaré and in the end of this year Fernando acted in the Christmas-telenovela of Televisa _Cuento de Navidad (1999/I) (mini)_. The peak of his career to date came in 2000-2001 when his telenovela Embrace Me Tightly won two awards for his acting in the leading role of Carlos Manuel Rivero, the "Los Heraldos" award, something like the Mexican Oscars and the "TV y Novelas" award, an award that is right from the votes of the Mexican audience, while "Abrázame muy fuerte" was the most successful telenovela of the year and of the most recent years and took the award of the best telenovela in the same ceremonies. At Christmas-time of 2001, Fernando filmed the Christmas-telenovela _"Navidad sin fin (2001) (mini)_ in which Fernando played a surprise role of an "ugly" and poor man.

Fernando Colunga is arguably the best Mexican actor and the most famous at the same time . He is the only actor that has filmed 5 very successful telenovelas successively . Fernando is beloved both in Mexico and the rest of the world. With all his roles, Fernando has proven that he isn't only a very handsome man, but a great actor too. Fernando Colunga is also an excellent, decent man with moral values in his life. He always keeps his personal life away from the press, while his dream is to be married once in his lifetime, like his beloved parents.

Jenna Harrison

Jenna Harrison is a British actress, she was born and raised in Gorleston, Norfolk, England. Jenna's career on screen came about while at sixth form college. Actor 'Adrian Rawlins' suggested she audition for the feature film 'My Brother Tom' co- starring Ben Whishaw. Jenna won the role. Roles in television and film followed including 'The Cambridge Spies' for the BBC, independent feature 'Telling Lies' with Jason Flemyng, and submarine drama 'Submerged' starring Sam Neil. Other television works include: 'Endeavour' (ITV), 'Jonothan Creek Christmas Special' (BBC), 'Rosemary and Thyme' (ITV), and 'The Impressions Show' (BBC). She has played leading roles in adaptations of 'Stranded' and 'Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister' for Hallmark and '12 Days of Terror' for CBS. Theatre roles include playing 'Charlotte Goodall' in 'Night of the Iguana' at the West End's Lyric Theatre with Woody Harrelson. Most recently Jenna has starred in Sci Fi thriller 'Chimera' opposite Kathleen Quinlan and Henry Ian Cusick and 'Servants Quarters' a psychological drama to be released in 2016.

Ernie Kovacs

Author, actor, comedian, composer and producer. He was educated at the New York School of Theatre, and received the Sylvania Television Award. Joining the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) in 1957, he composed a number of songs and themes, a number of which were used in his famed television comedy sketches including "Mr. Question Man". His other popular-songs included "Ugly Duckling", "So Good to Me", "The Patty Cake", "The Irving Wong Song", and many more.

Matt Riedy

Matt Riedy appears opposite Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall in The Judge and will soon be featured opposite Cam Gigandet and Wes Bentley in the thriller, Broken Vows. He plays the judge in Frank vs. God which is enjoying high audience praise at festivals around the country. Riedy recently did a recurring Guest Star on General Hospital and on Scandal, guest starred on NCIS New Orleans and was featured in a two-part guest appearance on Modern Family. He continues to be one of Jimmy Kimmel's skit cadre on Jimmy Kimmel Live! Not bad for the busy actor who started his on camera career after many years as a successful stand-up comedian and disc jockey. Born in Buffalo, New York, he graduated from West Seneca East High School, where he kept a low profile until a successful senior English class presentation on the sport of golf convinced him that he could perform in front of people. As luck would have it, a family friend complemented him on the quality of his voice, which led him to the radio club at Erie Community College. After just six weeks, he was a disc jockey, a job he held for ten years in Buffalo, Miami, San Francisco and Seattle. He took up stand-up comedy on the side in 1983, he left radio and hit the road full time from 1986-1997 when he got back into radio til 2005. All told, he did stand-up for 23 years, while working in radio. Riedy always considered acting "an impenetrable bubble," but in 1998, while working in Seattle, he won a small part opposite actress Margaret Colin in the television movie, Hit and Run. He soon landed a starring role as Plastic Man in the independent film Carried Away, which played in the Seattle International Film Festival. He scored several national commercials and a starring role in another independent film, Lover's Lane. While doing a guest appearance on the TV show The Fugitive, he was advised by director James Frawley to move to LA, where he could blossom as a character actor. Frawley was right and Riedy has been a busy working actor ever since. His television series credits include: Scandal, NCIS New Orleans, Big Time Rush, Wilfred, Raising Hope, NCIS: Los Angeles, Revenge, Days of Our Lives, Community, GCB, Hart of Dixie, Awake, Mad Men, Southland, Sons of Anarchy, Mr. Sunshine, Justified, The Cape, True Blood, Desperate Housewives, Cold Case and Ugly Betty. His films credits include: Oliver Stone's Savages, Delta Farce, Money Fight, Loaner, A Green Story, Coffee Town, The Den and Fratitude.

Allen Maldonado

Allen Maldonado is one of young Hollywood's busiest men. The multi-talented actor, philanthropist, and entrepreneur has starred in several blockbuster films and TV projects including Sony Pictures action thriller, THE EQUALIZER. Directed by Antoine Fuqua (TRAINING DAY, OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN), Maldonado stars as 'Marcus' opposite Academy Award winner Denzel Washington. The film is adapted from the television series of the same name and follows 'Robert McCall' (Washington), a solitary, monastic figure with a mysterious past who despises injustice and devotes himself to helping victims. The film was released and opened at #1 in the box office. Maldonado can also be seen in the feature CAKE alongside Jennifer Aniston, Sam Worthington, Anna Kendrick and William H. Macy. CAKE won a Golden Globe and several other awards. He then joined the cast of Universal's NWA biopic 'STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON, produced by Ice Cube and helmed by F. Gary Gray, which opened at #1 in the box office and stayed there for 4 weeks straight. Last September TV One aired the TV movie, RINGSIDE, in which Maldonado starred as Spencer Collier, the egotistical welterweight boxing champion of the world. In addition, he has 4 films in post-production slated to be released in 2017; First Match, Smartass, Quest, and Where's the Money?

Maldonado has also taken the small screen by storm making memorable appearances on Major Crimes and Rosewood, and is a recurring character on 3 TV shows including "You're The Worst", which centers on two toxic, self-destructive people who fall in love and attempt a relationship. He stars as 'Honey Nutz' in this sitcom which puts a dark twist on the romantic comedy genre. Maldonado is also on "Black-ish" which is centered on a family man who struggles to gain a sense of cultural identity while raising his kids in a predominantly white, upper-middle-class neighborhood. He stars as 'Curtis' the super cool millennial assistant in the offices of Stevens & Lido. Lastly, "Survivor's Remorse" is a hit comedy on Starz that follows Cam Calloway and his family as they deal with his recent rise in fame and money as a professional basketball player. Maldonado stars as 'DeShauwn May,' a wild and spontaneous ex-drug dealer turned sports manager. For season 3 of "Survivor's Remorse," he was brought on as a writer and quickly earned a "story by" credit, showing he's just as talented behind the camera as he is in front of it. He is currently still writing for season 4.

Of African American and Puerto Rican descent, Maldonado is a native of Rialto, CA, a city just outside of Los Angeles. Allen was raised by his single mother, having lost his father to cancer at a very young age. Growing up in a tough neighborhood, he was inspired by his mother's passion and determination. This platform of support has proven invaluable for him to achieve his goals. At the age of 21, Maldonado landed a year-long role in the daytime series "The Young & the Restless" until his career was briefly interrupted when he was involved in a near-fatal car accident with a drunk driver.

Outside of his acting career, Maldonado is a successful entrepreneur as he runs a record company- Get It Done Records; a production company- Only Son Productions; and a T-shirt line- Vineyards Phinest, where a portion of the proceeds go to his foundation. As a staunch advocate for higher education, community service, and encouraging youth to pursue the arts, Maldonado is the founder of Demo Nerds, a foundation that provides free acting classes, tools, and services for at-risk youth and foster children in the inner cities of Los Angeles. Additionally, the organization frequently collaborates with other city programs such as "The Boys & Girls Club," "The Dream Center," and the "New Village Girls Academy". After a brief, yet arduous recovery, Maldonado began to build his resume landing roles in the Emmy® nominated CBS drama "Judging Amy," and FX's "The Shield," "Detroit 187," "Chase," and "Rizzoli & Isles," to name a few. Additionally, his film credits include LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD, THE UGLY TRUTH, THE NEXT THREE DAYS, and the Marvel Studios short film ALL HAIL THE KING.

During his rare free time, Maldonado enjoys working out, boxing, playing basketball, and spending time with his family.

Richard Shepard

Richard Shepard is an Emmy and DGA award winning writer/director. His features include "Dom Hemingway" and "The Matador". He has directed 12 episodes of the Golden Globe winning HBO series "Girls", along with pilots for "Criminal Minds" "Rosewood", "Salem", "Ringer" and "Ugly Betty" for which he won the 2007 Emmy. He also directed the documentary, "I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale".

Isaac Florentine

Worshiped by his fans for many years Isaac Florentine has built up his excellent reputation within the movie business. At first attracting the action movie fans, Isaac moved into the mainstream with New Line's release Undisputed II: Last man standing. The film received rave reviews not only for its groundbreaking fighting scenes but also for its complexity and dramatic qualities. The film was also a financial success and was rated #1 in the "Non Theatrical" category of the DVD renters in February 2007 (source; Video Business Online - Market Data 02/01/07 and 02/11/07). 'Impact Magazine,' the world's leading publication dedicated to the Action/Martial Arts films hailed Isaac as "one of the most talented directors in the genre." Having over ten features and over one hundred and twenty television episodes under his belt, Isaac has proven his ability to bring leadership to the set, while providing the project with his own unique artistic flair. Born in Israel to Holocaust-survivor parents, Isaac often went to the movies as a child. When he saw a matinee showing of Sergio Leone's The Good, the Bad and The Ugly, he was immediately captivated by Leone's masterful operatic style. From that day on, Isaac was hooked. He now knew that he wanted to become a filmmaker. While in high school, Isaac shot three films with his father's super 8mm camera. After graduating from high school, he completed a mandatory three-year army service, and then went to Tel-Aviv University to attain a degree in Film & Television. Isaac's first film was an adaptation of Jacques Prevere poem, "Dejeuner Du Matin." His graduating project was a film called 'Farewell, Terminator', which awed critics with its vision, and was awarded Grand prize in the Mograbee Film Festival. In addition, the film won prizes for Best directing, editing, cinematography, costume, production design and music, plus it was chosen to represent Israel in the short foreign-student film category of the 1988 Academy Awards (the Oscars).The following year, Isaac decided to move to the United States to pursue his filmmaking career. This not only was a big move for him and his wife, Barbara, but Isaac also had to give up is highly successful Karate school (he had trained in martial arts since he was 13 years old, and by this time, was considered one of the best practitioners in the country). Isaac cut his teeth in the American film industry working as a fight choreographer and a second unit director. Two-and-a-half years later, he directed his first feature, Desert Kickboxer. Despite its hectic sixteen-day schedule and ultra-low budget, Isaac's inspired direction was so impressive that HBO bought the film. Since then, he has worked steadily as a director in film and television, and he continues to impress people with his creative visual style. After rewarding years in the United States, including having four children with Barbara, Isaac can look back and smile. But that doesn't mean that he's ready to rest yet. Isaac's passion for filmmaking has no limit, and he looks forward enthusiastically to even bigger cinematic challenges in his future.

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