1-50 of 3,585 names.

Tom Hardy

With his breakthrough performance as Eames in Christopher Nolan's science fiction thriller Inception, English actor Tom Hardy has been brought to the attention of mainstream audiences worldwide. But the versatile actor has been steadily working on both stage and screen since his television debut in the miniseries Band of Brothers. After being cast in the World War II drama, Hardy left his studies at the prestigious Drama Centre in London and was subsequently cast as Twombly in Ridley Scott's Black Hawk Down and as the villain Shinzon in Star Trek: Nemesis.

Tom was born on September 15, 1977 in Hammersmith, London; his mother, Elizabeth Anne (Barrett), is an artist and painter, and his father, Edward Hardy, is a writer. He is of English and Irish descent. Hardy was brought up in East Sheen, London, and first studied at Reed's School. His education continued at Tower House School, then at Richmond Drama School, and subsequently at the Drama Centre London, along with fellow Oscar nominee Michael Fassbender. After winning a modeling competition at age 21, he had a brief contract with the agency Models One.

Tom spent his teens and early twenties battling delinquency, alcoholism and drug addiction; after completing his work on Star Trek: Nemesis, he sought treatment and has also admitted that his battles with addiction ended his 5-year marriage to Rachael Speed.

Returning to work in 2003, Hardy was awarded the Evening Standard Most Promising Newcomer Award for his theatre performances in the productions of "In Arabia, We'd All Be Kings" and "Blood". In 2003, Tom also co-starred in the play "The Modernists" with Paul Popplewell, Jesse Spencer and Orlando Wells.

During the next five years, Hardy worked consistently in film, television and theatre, playing roles as varied as Robert Dudley in the BBC's The Virgin Queen, Bill Sikes in Oliver Twist and starring in "The Man of Mode" at the National Theatre. On the silver screen, he appeared in the crime thriller Layer Cake with Daniel Craig, Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette, and the romp Scenes of a Sexual Nature.

In 2006, Hardy created "Shotgun", an underground theatre company along with director Robert Delamere, and directed a play, penned by his father for the company, called "Blue on Blue". In 2007, Hardy received a best actor BAFTA nomination for his touching performance as Stuart Shorter in the BBC adaptation of Alexander Masters' bestselling biography Stuart: A Life Backwards. Hardy, hailed for his transformative character acting, was lauded for his emotionally and physically convincing portrayal in the ill-fated and warmhearted tale of Shorter, a homeless and occasionally violent man suffering from addiction and muscular dystrophy.

The following year, he appeared as gay hoodlum Handsome Bob in the Guy Ritchie film RocknRolla, but it would be his next transformation that would prove his extensive range and stun critics. In the film Bronson, Hardy played the notorious Charles Bronson (given name, Michael Peterson), the "most violent prisoner in Britain". Bald, pumped-up, and outfitted with Bronson's signature strongman mustache, Hardy is unrecognizable and gives a harrowing performance that is physically fearless and psychologically unsettling. Director Nicolas Winding Refn breaks the fourth wall with Hardy retelling his tales directly to viewers as well as performing them outright before an audience of his own imagining. The performance mixes terrifying brutality, vaudevillian showmanship, wry humor, and an alarming amount of commitment, and won Hardy a British Independent Film Award for Best Actor. The performance got Hollywood's attention and, in 2009, Hardy was named one of Variety's "10 Actors to Watch". That year, he continued to garner praise for his starring role in The Take, a four-part adaptation of Martina Cole's bestselling crime novel, as well as for his performance as Heathcliff in a version of Wuthering Heights.

Recent work includes the aforementioned breakthrough appearance in Inception alongside Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Cillian Murphy, Tom Berenger, Ken Watanabe, Michael Caine, Marion Cotillard and Ellen Page. The movie was released in July 2010 and became one of top 25 highest grossing films of all time, collecting eight Oscar nominations (including Best Picture) and winning four.

Other films include Warrior, opposite Joel Edgerton, the story of two estranged brothers facing the fight of a lifetime from director Gavin O'Connor, and This Means War, directed by McG and co-starring Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine. Tom also starred in the heralded Cold War thriller, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy with Colin Firth and Gary Oldman.

Hardy rejoined Christopher Nolan for The Dark Knight Rises; he played the villain role of Bane opposite Christian Bale, Anne Hathaway, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Gary Oldman. Hardy's menacing physique and his character's scrambled, hard-to-distinguish voice became a major discussion point as the film was released.

Outside of performing, Hardy is the patron for the charity "Flack", which is an organization to aid the recovery of the homeless in Cambridge. And, in 2010, Hardy was named an Ambassador for The Prince's Trust, which helps disadvantaged youth. On the recent stage, he starred in the Brett C. Leonard play "The Long Red Road" in early 2010. Written for Hardy and directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman, the play was staged at Chicago's Goodman Theater.

In 2015, Hardy starred as the iconic Mad Max in George Miller's reboot of his franchise, Mad Max: Fury Road. He also collected a British Independent Film Award for his portrayal of both the Kray twins, Ronnie and Reggie, in Legend, and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for his role as John Fitzgerald in The Revenant.

He has an outlaw biker story among other projects in development. In 2010, Hardy became engaged to fellow English actress, Charlotte Riley, whom he starred with in The Take and Wuthering Heights, and is raising a young son, Louis, with ex-girlfriend Rachael Speed.

Eva Green

Eva Gaëlle Green was born on July 6, 1980, in Paris, France. She has a fraternal twin sister. Her father, Walter Green, is a dentist who appeared in the 1966 film Au Hasard Balthazar. Her mother, Marlène Jobert, is an actress turned children's book writer. Eva's mother was born in Algeria, of Sephardi Jewish heritage (during that time, Algeria was part of France), and Eva's father is of Swedish and French descent. Eva left French school at 17. She switched to English in Ramsgate, Kent, and went to the American School in France for one year. She studied acting at Saint Paul Drama School in Paris for three years, then had a 10-week polishing course at the Weber Douglas Academy of dramatic Art in London. She also studied directing at the Tisch School of Arts at New York University. She returned to Paris as an accomplished young actress, and played on stage in several theater productions: "La Jalousie en Trois Fax" and "Turcaret". There, she caught the eye of director Bernardo Bertolucci. Green followed a recommendation to work on her English. She studied for two months with an English coach before doing The Dreamers with Bernardo Bertolucci. During their work, Bertolucci described Green as being "so beautiful it's indecent". Green won critical acclaim for her role in The Dreamers. She also attracted a great deal of attention from male audiences for her full frontal nudity in several scenes of the film. Besides her work as an actress, Green also composed original music and recorded several sound tracks for the film score. After "The Dreamers", Green's career ascended to the level where she revealed more of her multifaceted acting talent. She played the love interest of cult French gentleman stealer, Arsène Lupin, opposite Romain Duris. In 2005, she co-starred, opposite Orlando Bloom and Liam Neeson, in Kingdom of Heaven, produced and directed by Ridley Scott. The film brought her a wider international exposure. She turned down the femme fatale role in The Black Dahlia, that went to Hilary Swank, because she didn't want to end up always typecast as a femme fatale after her role in "The Dreamers". Instead, Eva Green accepted the prestigious role of "Vesper Lynd", one of three Bond girls, opposite Daniel Craig, in Casino Royale and became the 5th French actress to play a James Bond girl, after Claudine Auger in Thunderball, Corinne Cléry in Moonraker, Carole Bouquet in For Your Eyes Only and Sophie Marceau in The World Is Not Enough. Since her school years, Green has been a cosmopolitan multilingual and multicultural person. Yet, since her father always lived in France with them and her mother, she and her twin sister can't speak Swedish. She developed a wide scope of interests beyond her acting profession and became an aspiring art connoisseur and an avid museum visitor. Her other activities, outside of acting, include playing and composing music, cooking at home, walking her terrier, and collecting art. She shares time between her two residencies, one is in Paris, France, and one in London, England.

Scarlett Johansson

Scarlett Johansson was born in New York City. Her mother, Melanie Sloan, is from an Ashkenazi Jewish family, and her father, Karsten Johansson, is Danish. She has a sister, Vanessa Johansson, who is also an actress, a brother, Adrian, a twin brother, Hunter Johansson, born three minutes after her, and a paternal half-brother, Christian. Her grandfather was writer Ejner Johansson.

Johansson began acting during childhood, after her mother started taking her to auditions. She made her professional acting debut at the age of eight in the off-Broadway production of "Sophistry" with Ethan Hawke, at New York's Playwrights Horizons. She would audition for commercials but took rejection so hard her mother began limiting her to film tryouts. She made her film debut at the age of nine, as John Ritter's character's daughter in the 1994 fantasy comedy, North. Following minor roles in the 1995 film Just Cause, as the daughter of Sean Connery and Kate Capshaw's character, and If Lucy Fell, she played the role of Amanda in Manny & Lo. Her performance in Manny & Lo garnered a nomination for the Independent Spirit Award for Best Lead Female, and positive reviews, one noting, "[the film] grows on you, largely because of the charm of ... Scarlett Johansson", while San Francisco Chronicle critic Mick LaSalle commentated on her "peaceful aura", and wrote, "If she can get through puberty with that aura undisturbed, she could become an important actress." After appearing in minor roles in Fall and Home Alone 3 in 1997, Johansson garnered widely spread attention for her performance in the 1998 film The Horse Whisperer, directed by Robert Redford, where she played Grace MacLean, a teenager traumatized by a riding accident. She received a nomination for the Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Most Promising Actress for the film. In 1999, she appeared in My Brother the Pig and in 2001 in the Coen brothers film The Man Who Wasn't There. Also in 1999, she appeared in the music video for Mandy Moore's single, "Candy". Although the film was not a box office success, she received praise for her break-out role in Ghost World, credited with "sensitivity and talent [that] belie her age". She was also featured in the Coen Brothers' dark drama The Man Who Wasn't There, opposite Billy Bob Thornton and Frances McDormand. In 2002, she appeared in Eight Legged Freaks with David Arquette.

In 2003, she was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards, one for drama (Girl with a Pearl Earring) and one for comedy (Lost in Translation), her breakout role, starring opposite Bill Murray, and receiving rave reviews and a Best Actress Award at the Venice Film Festival. Her 2004 film roles include the critically acclaimed Weitz brothers' film "In Good Company," as well as starring opposite John Travolta in "A Love Song For Bobby Long," which garnered her a Golden Globe nomination (her third in two years).

She dropped out of Mission: Impossible III due to scheduling conflicts. Her next film role was in The Island alongside Ewan McGregor which earned weak reviews from U.S. critics. After this, she appeared in Woody Allen's Match Point and was nominated again for a Golden Globe Award. In May 2008, she released her album "Anywhere I Lay My Head," a collection of Tom Waits covers featuring one original song. Also that year, she starred in Frank Miller's The Spirit, the Woody Allen film Vicky Cristina Barcelona, and played Mary Boleyn opposite Natalie Portman in The Other Boleyn Girl.

Since then, she has appeared as part of an ensemble cast in the romantic comedy He's Just Not That Into You, the action superhero film Iron Man 2, the comedy-drama We Bought a Zoo and started as the original scream queen, Janet Leigh, in Hitchcock. She then played her Iron Man 2 character, Black Widow, in the blockbuster action films The Avengers, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, and Avengers: Age of Ultron, and also headlined the science-fiction thriller Lucy, a box office success. With more than a decade of work already under her belt, Scarlett has proven to be one of Hollywood's most talented young actresses.

Scarlett and Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds were engaged in May 2008 and married in September of that year. In 2010, the couple announced their separation, and subsequently divorced in 2011. In 2013, she became engaged to French journalist Romain Dauriac, and the couple, who have a daughter, married in 2014.

Katheryn Winnick

Canadian actress Katheryn Winnick stars in the critically acclaimed, Emmy award-winning television series Vikings. produced by MGM and The History Channel. Entertainment Weekly declared that her role as "Lagertha" may be the most exciting feminist character on TV." Her portrayal of the fierce shield maiden has garnered her several impressive nominations including a nomination for a Critic's Choice Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Drama Series, a Canadian Screen Award nomination for Best Performance by a Lead Dramatic Actress (2014), Best Actress in a Drama Series by the Women's Image Network in both 2014 & 2015 and a Golden Maple Award nomination for Best Actress in a TV Series. In addition to these prestigious nominations, Katheryn won the Serendipity Film's Award of Excellence at the Banff World Media Festival in 2015.

Recently, Winnick wrapped production on the highly anticipated adaptation of the Stephen King novel The Dark Tower, starring Academy Award winner Matthew McConaughey and Golden Globe winner Idris Elba due for release in February 2017. Winnick also stars opposite Gerard Butler in the Warner Brother's feature film Geostorm.

Winnick's other credits include roles in such movies as Love & Other Drugs with Jake Gyllenhaal, Killers starring Ashton Kutcher, as well as Stand Up Guys with Al Pacino, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin. She also starred in the Paul Giamatti comedy drama Cold Souls, which received a best ensemble performance nomination in the 2009 Gotham Independent Film Awards.

Off the big screen, Katheryn is no stranger to TV and in addition to Vikings has had numerous television appearances including roles in Person of Interest, House M.D (2004), CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, "Law and Order: Criminal Intent" (2001), and a notable recurring role on the hit prime time series, Bones.

In 2015, Winnick was named as the brand ambassador for luxury Swiss watch company Raymond Weil and is the face of their 2016 elegant and feminine Shine Collection. Katheryn proudly endorses the brand of watches, which celebrates both the strength and beauty of the active modern woman worldwide.

In addition to acting, Katheryn Winnick is an accomplished martial artist who holds a third-degree black belt in Taekwondo and a second-degree black belt in Karate. By twenty-one she had founded and owned three martial arts schools. After completing her university education at York University, Toronto, Katheryn went on to successfully pursue an acting career in New York and subsequently Los Angeles.

Tom Hughes

Cheshire-born - in 1986 - Tom Hughes attended Upton High School and even before going to RADA had a wealth of acting experience with the Cheshire Youth Theatre, the Jigsaw Music Group, the Liverpool Everyman Youth Theatre and the Belgian company Victoria. He even managed to find time to play in a band Safehouse. Since graduation from RADA in 2008 Tom has been the face of Burberry's Summer collection, along with Emma Watson, formed a new band Quaintways and made his mark in several television series from 'Casualty 1909' to 'Silk'. In July 2010 'Company Magazine' voted him the tenth most eligible bachelor in Britain.

Louie Anderson

Iconic comedian Louie Anderson, the two-time Emmy award winner, is one of the country's most recognized and adored comics; named by Comedy Central as "One of 100 Greatest Stand-Up Comedians of All Time." His career has spanned more than 30 years. He is a best selling author, star of his own stand up specials and sitcoms, and he continues to tour the country performing to standing room only crowds worldwide.

In 2016, Louie was cast to co-star along with Zach Galifianakis and Martha Kelly in the hit FX series, "Baskets." Anderson's extraordinary new role is Christine Baskets, the matriarch of the Baskets clan. The character is based on both his mother and his five sisters, who were a major presence in his life.

"I'm not as nice in the character as my mom was as a person. It really is an extension of my mom, Anderson says, adding that he always aims to make his performance "as real as possible" without "affecting or cartooning it up. It felt like it was divine intervention when I got the call to be on the show, that somehow my mom, from the great beyond, was finally getting herself into show business where she truly belonged in the first place."

Sharing the ups and downs of his childhood experiences as one of eleven children in Minnesota, Louie crafted comedy routines that rang true for his early club audiences while reducing them to helpless fits of laughter, routines that led him from his career as a counselor to troubled children to the first-place trophy at the 1981 Midwest Comedy Competition. Henny Youngman, who hosted the competition, recognized the diamond-in-the-rough genius of the young comic and hired him as a writer, providing invaluable experience that soon put Louie in his own spotlight on comedy stages all over the country.

Johnny Carson, the comedy icon for generations of rising stars, invited Louie to make his national television debut on the "The Tonight Show" in 1984, and the rest is history. Leno, Letterman, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, "Comic Relief" and Showtime, HBO and CMT specials followed, including hosting the legendary game show, Family Feud, making Louie a household name and opening doors for him as an actor. He has guest-starred in sitcoms like "Grace Under Fire" and dramas like "Touched by an Angel" and "Chicago Hope," and he has had memorable featured roles in film comedies like "Coming to America," opposite of Eddie Murphy, and the classic "Ferris Bueller's Day Off." In 2013, he took a dive on the ABC reality series, "Splash" where he conquered his own fears while becoming an inspiration of hope. His stand up Special, "Big Baby Boomer" premiered on CMT, in 2013. Also in that year, he competed and inspired on the ABC reality competition show, Splash. In 1995 Louie put his creative energies to work on the Saturday morning animated series "Life with Louie." The long-running series based on Louie's own childhood and his life with his father won three Humanitas Prizes for writing on a children's' animated series, making him the only three-time recipient of this award. It also earned a Genesis Award for its depiction of the proper treatment of animals and, most significantly, two Emmy Awards. His best selling books include Dear Dad - Letters From An Adult Child, a collection of alternately touching and outrageous letters from Louie to his late father, and Good-bye Jumbo...Hello Cruel World, self-help for those who struggle with self-esteem issues, and his latest installment on family, The F Word, How To Survive Your Family. When not in production, Louie continues to tour, traveling the States doing what Louie loves to do, Stand Up Comedy. Louie again delivers to his fans his inimitable brand of humor and warmth.

Mark Wahlberg

American actor Mark Wahlberg is one of a handful of respected entertainers who successfully made the transition from teen pop idol to respected actor. A Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee for The Departed who went on to receive positive critical reviews for his performance in The Fighter, Wahlberg also is a solid comedy actor, proven by his starring role in Ted.

Mark Robert Michael Wahlberg was born June 5, 1971 in a poor working class district, Dorchester, of Boston, Massachusetts. He is the son of Alma Elaine (Donnelly), a nurse's aide and clerk, and Donald Edward Wahlberg, a delivery driver. Wahlberg is the youngest of nine children. He is of Irish, Swedish (from his paternal grandfather), and more distant French-Canadian and English, descent. The large Wahlberg brood didn't have a lot growing up, especially after his parents divorced when he was eleven. The kids crammed into a three bedroom apartment, none of them having very much privacy. Mark's mother has said that after the divorce, she became very self-absorbed with her own problems. She has blamed herself for her son's subsequent problems and delinquency. Wahlberg dropped out of high school at age 14 (but later got his GED) to pursue a life of petty crime and drugs. He'd spend his days scamming and stealing, working on the odd drug deal before treating himself to the substances himself.

The young man also had a violent streak - one which was often aimed at minorities. At age sixteen, he was convicted of assault against two Vietnamese men after he had tried to rob them. As a result of his assault conviction, he was sentenced to serve 50 days in prison at Deer Island penitentiary. Whilst there, he began working out to pass time and, when he emerged at the end of his sentence, he had gone from being a scrawny young kid to a buff young man. Wahlberg also credits the jail time as being his motivation to improve his lifestyle and leave the crime behind him.

Around this time, his older brother Donnie Wahlberg had become an overnight teen idol as a member of the 1980s boy band New Kids on the Block. A precursor to the boy-band craze, the group was dominating the charts and were on top of their game. Mark himself had been an original member of the band but had backed out early on - uncomfortable with the squeaky clean image of the group. Donnie used his connections in the music business to help his little brother secure a recording contract, and soon the world was introduced to Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, with Wahlberg as a bad-boy rapper who danced in his boxers. Despite a lack of singing ability, promoters took to his dance moves and a physique they knew teenage girls would love.

Donnie scripted some easy songs for Mark, who collected a troupe of dancers and a DJ to become his "Funky Bunch" and "Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch" was born. His debut album, "Music for the People", was a smash hit, which was propelled along by the rapper's willingness to disrobe down to boxer-briefs on stage, not to mention several catchy tunes. Teenage girls thrilled to the rapping "bad boy". Record producer David Geffen saw in Wahlberg a cash-cow of marketing ability. After speaking to designer Calvin Klein, Marky Mark was set up as the designer's chief underwear model.

His scantily clad figure soon adorned billboards across the nation. Ironically, while the New Kids on the Block's fame was dwindling as audiences tired of their syrupy lyrics, "Marky Mark's" bad boy image was becoming even more of a commodity. He was constantly in the headlines (often of the tabloids) after multiple scandals. In 1992, he released a book dedicated to his penis. Wahlberg was constantly getting into rumored fights, most memorably with Madonna and her entourage at a Los Angeles party. While things were always intense, they were relatively harmless and made for enjoyable reading for the public. However, when the story of his arrest for assault (and the allegations of racism) broke in the press, things took on a decidedly darker note. People were not amused. Soon after, while on a British talk show along with rapper Shabba Ranks, he got into even more trouble. After Ranks made the statement that gays should be crucified, Wahlberg was accused of condoning the comments by his silence. Marky Mark was suddenly surrounded by charges of brutality, homophobia and racial hatred. His second album, "You Gotta Believe", had not been faring well and, after the charges surfaced, it plummeted from the charts.

Adding to the hoopla, Wahlberg was brought to court for allegedly assaulting a security guard. He was ordered to make amends by appearing in a series of anti-bias advertisements. Humbled and humiliated by his fall from grace in the music world, Wahlberg decided to pursue another angle, acting. He dropped the "Marky Mark" moniker and became known simply as Mark Wahlberg. His first big screen role came in Penny Marshall's Renaissance Man. Despite the name change, many people snickered at the idea of the has-been rapper thinking he could make it as an actor. From the get-go, he was proving them wrong. In Renaissance Man, he gave an utterly charming performance as a simple but sincere army recruit. What naysayers remained found it increasingly difficult to write Mark Wahlberg off as he delivered one fine performance after another. He blew them away in the controversial The Basketball Diaries and chilled them in Fear as every father's worst nightmare.

The major turning point in Wahlberg's career came with the role of troubled porn star Dirk Diggler in Paul Thomas Anderson's Boogie Nights. Since then, Wahlberg has chosen roles that demonstrate a wide range of dramatic ability, starring in critically acclaimed dramas such as Three Kings and The Perfect Storm, popcorn flicks like Planet of the Apes and Contraband, and even indies such as I Heart Huckabees.

Wahlberg was the executive producer of such television series as Boardwalk Empire, In Treatment and the highly successful comedy Entourage, which was partly based on his experiences in Hollywood.

Wahlberg and his wife Rhea Durham have four children.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt

Joseph Leonard Gordon-Levitt was born February 17, 1981 in Los Angeles, California, to Jane Gordon and Dennis Levitt. Joseph was raised in a Jewish family with his late older brother, Dan Gordon-Levitt, who passed away in October 2010. His parents worked for the Pacifica Radio station KPFK-FM and his maternal grandfather, Michael Gordon, had been a well-known movie director. After working for several years as a child actor, Joseph became better known for starring on the hit television series 3rd Rock from the Sun, for which he earned two Hollywood Reporter Young Star Awards. In addition, the show earned three Screen Actors Guild Award nominations for Outstanding Peformance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series. Prior to his success on television, Joseph had already worked steadily in feature films, debuting in the Robert Redford film A River Runs Through It. He won a Young Artist Award for the latter film. During the 1990s, he also co-starred in the films Angels in the Outfield, The Juror, Halloween H20: 20 Years Later, and 10 Things I Hate About You.

Following his work on 3rd Rock from the Sun, Joseph took time off from acting to attend Columbia University. In the early 2000s, he broke from the mold of his television and film comedy supporting roles by appearing in a string of intense dramatic roles, mostly in smaller, independent films such as Manic, with Don Cheadle; Mysterious Skin, for writer/director Gregg Araki; Rian Johnson's award-winning debut film, Brick; Lee Daniels' Shadowboxer; the crime drama The Lookout, which marked Scott Frank's directorial debut; John Madden's Killshot, with Diane Lane and Mickey Rourke; and the controversial drama Stop-Loss, in which he starred with Ryan Phillippe, under the direction of Kimberly Peirce. By 2009, Joseph was officially established as one of the leading men of indie cinema with his Golden Globe-nominated role in the comedy-drama (500) Days of Summer, for which he also received an Independent Spirit Award nod. He also adapted the Elmore Leonard short story Sparks into a 24-minute short film that he directed (Sundance Film Festival 2009).

In 2010, he headlined the indie drama Hesher and also established himself as a mainstream star in Christopher Nolan's Inception. Balancing both independent and Hollywood film, Joseph scored another Golden Globe nod for the cancer drama 50/50, directed by Jonathan Levine and also starring Seth Rogen, Anna Kendrick, and Bryce Dallas Howard. He worked again with director Nolan on The Dark Knight Rises (for which he received a People's Choice Award nomination for Favorite Movie Actor), and snagged leading roles in both Premium Rush, directed by David Koepp, and Looper, for which he reunited with his Brick director, Rian Johnson, and starred opposite Bruce Willis and Emily Blunt. Also in 2012, he played Abraham Lincoln's son Robert in Steven Spielberg's Oscar-nominated Lincoln, with Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Field.

In 2013, Joseph Gordon-Levitt starred in his critically-acclaimed feature film directorial debut, Don Jon, from a script he wrote, opposite Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore. He was nominated for an Independent Spirit Award for "Best First Screenplay" for the film. Gordon-Levitt provided the voice of Jiro Horikoshi in the 2014 English-language version of Hayao Miyazaki's Academy Award-nominated animated feature The Wind Rises, and appeared in Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller's Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, in which he played Johnny, a character Miller created for the film.

Gordon-Levitt founded and directs hitRECord, an open collaborative production. hitRECord creates and develops art and media collectively using their website where anyone with an internet connection can upload their records, download and remix others' records, and work on projects together. When the results of these RECords are produced and make money, hitRECord splits the profits 50/50 with everybody who contributed to the final production. hitRECord has published books, put out records, gone on tour and has screened their work at major festivals including Sundance and TIFF. "RegularJOE" (as he's known on the site) is leading the community of over 300, 000 artists in its biggest collaboration yet, a new take on a variety show called "HitRecord on TV!" The half hour series, which Gordon-Levitt hosts, premiered in January on Participant Media's new cable network, Pivot and has been renewed for a second season.

Olivia Wilde

Actress and activist Olivia Wilde is a modern-day renaissance woman. Starring in films and popular television shows, Wilde shares the screen with renowned actors while simultaneously giving back to the community.

Olivia Wilde was born Olivia Jane Cockburn in New York City, to journalists Leslie Cockburn (née Leslie Corkill Redlich) and Andrew Cockburn. Her father is from an upper-class British family and her mother is American-born; her recent ancestry includes English, Scottish, German, Irish, and Manx. Olivia was raised in Washington, D.C., and went to school there, as well as at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, from which she graduated in 2002. Her father was born in England and later became an Irish citizen, giving Olivia dual American and Irish nationality, and facilitating her brief study at the Gaiety School of Acting in Dublin, Ireland. After appearing in the short-lived Fox television series Skin, she made her Hollywood debut in The Girl Next Door and then came to public notice in The O.C., but it was as Dr. Remy "Thirteen" Hadley in House M.D. that she achieved international stardom. She has since starred or co-starred in the films TRON: Legacy, Cowboys & Aliens, In Time, People Like Us and The Words.

Wilde's 2010s film credits include the star-studded Third Person, the Oscar-winning drama Her and critically-acclaimed and Golden Globe-nominated Rush. Wilde also produced and starred in the indie comedy Drinking Buddies.

In 2013, Wilde launched the philanthropic company Conscious Commerce, with the mission to create a guide for conscious living by promoting the causes, brands, people and lifestyles that are forging a new paragon of living. In line with the Conscious Commerce mission, Wilde also recently signed on to be the face of H&M's latest Conscious Exclusive Collection, which is made completely using organic and recycled materials. She is also a board member of Artists For Peace and Justice and sits on the foundation board of the ACLU of Southern California.

In 2015, Wilde produced and starred in the drama Meadowland, which premiered at the year's Tribeca Film Festival. Wilde earned rave reviews for her emotionally charged performance as a mother coping with the heartbreak following her young son's disappearance. Up next for Wilde is the holiday comedy Love The Coopers. The film, which features an ensemble cast, follows the exasperated members of an extended family who gather for their annual holiday celebration.

Returning to television next year, Wilde will star alongside Bobby Canavale in HBO's Untitled Rock 'N' Roll drama. Set in 1970s New York, the series is being produced by Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger and Terence Winter. Wilde previously starred in FOX's acclaimed medical drama "House," playing the standout Dr. Thirteen for six seasons.

Bruce Willis

Actor and musician Bruce Willis is well known for playing wisecracking or hard-edged characters, often in spectacular action films. Collectively, he has appeared in films that have grossed in excess of $2.5 billion USD, placing him in the top ten stars in terms of box office receipts.

Walter Bruce Willis was born on March 19, 1955, in Idar-Oberstein, West Germany, to a German mother, Marlene K. (from Kassel), and an American father, David Andrew Willis (from Carneys Point, New Jersey), who were then living on a United States military base. His family moved to the U.S. shortly after he was born, and he was raised in Penns Grove, New Jersey, where his mother worked at a bank and his father was a welder and factory worker. Willis picked up an interest for the dramatic arts in high school, and was allegedly "discovered" whilst working in a café in New York City and then appeared in a couple of off-Broadway productions. While bartending one night, he was seen by a casting director who liked his personality and needed a bartender for a small movie role.

After countless auditions, Willis contributed minor film appearances, usually uncredited, before landing the role of private eye "David Addison" alongside sultry Cybill Shepherd in the hit romantic comedy television series Moonlighting. The series firmly established Bruce Willis as a hot new talent, and his sarcastic and wisecracking P.I. was in effect a dry run for the role of hard-boiled NYC detective "John McClane" in the monster hit Die Hard. This superbly paced action film balanced laconic humor and wholesale destruction as Willis' character single handedly battles a gang of ruthless international thieves in a Los Angeles skyscraper. Willis reprized the role of tough guy cop "John McClane" in the eagerly anticipated sequel Die Hard 2 set at snowbound Washington's Dulles International Airport as a group of renegade Special Forces soldiers seek to repatriate a corrupt South American general. Excellent box office returns demanded a further sequel Die Hard with a Vengeance this time also starring Samuel L. Jackson as a cynical Harlem shopowner unwittingly thrust into assisting McClane during a terrorist bombing campaign on a sweltering day in NYC.

Willis found time out from all the action mayhem to provide the voice of "Mikey" the baby in the very popular family comedies Look Who's Talking, and its sequel Look Who's Talking Too also starring John Travolta and Kirstie Alley. Over the next decade, Willis starred in some very successful films, some very offbeat films and some unfortunate box office flops. The Bonfire of the Vanities and Hudson Hawk were both large scale financial disasters that were savaged by the critics, and both are arguably best left off the CVs of all the actors involved, however Willis was still popular with movie audiences and selling plenty of theatre tickets with the hyperviolent The Last Boy Scout, the darkly humored Death Becomes Her and the mediocre police thriller Striking Distance. During the 1990s, Willis also appeared in several independent and low budget productions that won him new fans and praise from the critics for his intriguing performances working with some very diverse film directors. He appeared in the oddly appealing North, as a cagey prizefighter in the Quentin Tarantino directed mega-hit Pulp Fiction, the Terry Gilliam directed apocalyptic thriller Twelve Monkeys, the Luc Besson directed sci-fi opus The Fifth Element and the M. Night Shyamalan directed spine-tingling epic The Sixth Sense.

Willis next starred in the gangster comedy The Whole Nine Yards, worked again with "hot" director M. Night Shyamalan in the less gripping Unbreakable, and in two military dramas, Hart's War and Tears of the Sun that both failed to really fire with movie audiences or critics alike. However, Willis bounced back into the spotlight in the critically applauded Frank Miller graphic novel turned movie Sin City, the voice of "RJ" the scheming raccoon in the animated hit Over the Hedge and "Die Hard" fans rejoiced to see "John McClane" return to the big screen in the high tech Live Free or Die Hard aka "Die Hard 4.0".

Willis was married to actress Demi Moore for approximately thirteen years and they share custody to their three children.

Caitriona Balfe

Caitriona Balfe was born in Dublin, Ireland, and grew up in the village of Tydavnet, in County Monaghan. She started modeling at the age of 19 after she was scouted by an agent while she was collecting money for charity at a local mall. She has both walked the runway and been featured in advertising campaigns for many top fashion brands, including: Dolce & Gabbana, Fendi, DKNY, Burberry, Dior, Louis Vuitton, H&M, Marc Jacobs, Valentino, Cacharel, Roberto Cavalli, Givenchy, Hugo Boss, Armani, Dries van Noten, Calvin Klein and Chanel.

She has also graced the covers of magazines such as Vogue and Elle. At the time she was scouted, Balfe was studying drama at the Dublin Institute of Technology, hoping to become an actress. She returned to her initial career choice in 2009.

John Krasinski

Tall, handsome American film and television star John Krasinski is probably best known for his role as sardonic nice guy "Jim Halpert" on NBC's popular TV series, The Office, for which he won a 2007 and 2008 Screen Actors Guild Award for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.

Born John Burke Krasinski on October 20, 1979, in Newton, Massachussetts, USA, he is the youngest of three brothers. His mother, Mary Claire (Doyle), is a nurse, and his father, Ronald Krasinski, is an internist. His father is of Polish descent and his mother is of Irish ancestry.

His first stage experience was starring in a satirical high school play, written and cast by B.J. Novak. Also good at sports, he played on the same Little League baseball team as B.J. Novak, now a writer and co-star on The Office. After graduating from Newton South High School in 1997, Krasinski planned to be an English major and deferred his first semester of college to teach English in Costa Rica. He attended Brown University, graduating in 2001, as a playwright with honors, then studied at the Eugene O'Neill National Theatre Institute in Waterford, Connecticut.

During the summer of 2000, he worked as a script intern on Late Night with Conan O'Brien. Krasinski made his big screen debut in 2002, then played several small roles like "Ben" in Kinsey, and "Bob Flynn" in Duane Hopwood. He appeared as "Corporal Harrigan" in Jarhead, by director Sam Mendes, then played a supporting role as "Ben" in The Holiday, a romantic comedy by director Nancy Meyers. He is billed as the voice of "Lancelot" in Shrek the Third. Krasinski co-starred opposite Robin Williams and Mandy Moore in the romantic comedy License to Wed, as well as with George Clooney and Renée Zellweger in the football screwball comedy, Leatherheads. He is also director and writer of Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, a big screen adaptation of the eponymous collection of short stories by David Foster Wallace.

Krasinski was featured in People Magazine's Sexiest Men Alive issue of 2006. He claims Los Angeles as his current home but travels to New York City and his hometown of Newton, MA, frequently.

Hugh Grant

Hugh Grant, one of Britain's best known faces, has been equally entertaining on-screen as well as in real life, and has had enough sense of humor to survive a media frenzy. He is known for his roles in Four Weddings and a Funeral, with Andie MacDowell, Notting Hill, opposite Julia Roberts, and Music and Lyrics, opposite Drew Barrymore, among his other works.

He was born Hugh John Mungo Grant on September 9, 1960, in Hammersmith, London, United Kingdom. His mother, Fyvola Susan (MacLean), was a teacher. His father, James Murray Grant, was an artist and carpet salesman, and his grandfather was in the British Army during WWII. He is of mostly Scottish and English descent, with many recent ancestors who were prominent in the military. Young Grant was fond of literature and acting. He won a scholarship to Oxford, going up to New College in 1979. There he was involved in student drama, and considered a career as an art historian. After Oxford, he turned down a scholarship to do postgraduate studies in Art History at the Courtauld Institute in London, and focused on his acting career. In 1982, while still a student, Grant made his big screen debut in Privileged by director Michael Hoffman.

Grant's breakthrough came with the leading role as Charles in Four Weddings and a Funeral, opposite Andie MacDowell, a role which won him a Golden Globe Award, as well as a BAFTA Film Award for Best Actor. During the 1990s Grant established himself as a very original and resourceful actor. He played a string of characters projecting a positive mindset, showing how do you stay optimistic when you are actually worried about a cascade of troubles. Grant had his own experience as a survivor of an unfortunate episode in his private life, which he managed to overcome thanks to having a pretty damn good outlook on life.

His forte is playing characters projecting warmth and sincere happiness, with his hallmark stuttering, albeit some accused him of reprising the same character he has been playing for the past two decades. Grant's ability to show his character development within a limited screen time shines in Love Actually, with his witty portrayal of a Prime Minister whose personal insecurities become intertwined with his country's international affairs, a performance that earned him a nomination for European Audience Award. His screen presence and skillful understatement takes his characters beyond the written script, thanks to his mastery of timing and effortless style.

Outside of his acting profession, Grant has been a good athlete, he played cricket and football in his younger years. He enjoys playing golf, frequently taking part in Pro-Am tournaments. He has been an avid art lover since his younger years, and has been collecting fine art, a passion he inherited from his father.

Pamela Anderson

Pamela Denise Anderson was born to young newlyweds Barry and Carol Anderson in Ladysmith (Vancouver Island), BC, Canada - They are still together after 48yrs. Madly in love. One younger brother Gerry, born 1971. (Niece Kylie Rose) A modest beginning. An acrobat and gymnast ages 7-12. An athlete throughout school. Regrettably only a high school education. (art, English, philosophy, psychology, poetry, music). Waitressed from 16-19 Moved to Vancouver at 19 Spotted at BC Lion's football game by the Jumbo-tron camera man. Quickly became known as "The Blue Zone girl" commercial campaign, face of trendsetters Gym. Playboy called (said no- too shy). Phone rang at home during a fight with ex-fiancé, she decided to spontaneously accept an offer to shoot a cover only- Asked mom... She agreed ... The family agreed after speaking with Mr. Hefner. 14 American Playboy covers. Worked with many photographers and artists worldwide. Home Improvement (3 seasons). Baywatch (5 seasons). VIP (5 seasons). Barb Wire, Borat. Theater - Aladdin (Panto) (Wimbledon and Liverpool). 2 children (boys Brandon and Dylan) to Tommy Lee. PETA supporter (lifelong animal rights advocate). Founded the Pamela Anderson Foundation. Activist for Animal and Human Rights, NDVH and Environmental Issues. On the board of the Sea Shepherd. Loves architecture and is designing Eco-friendly prefab small dwellings. A collection of linens. Sharing time between the beaches of California and Vancouver Island equally. 2013 New York City Marathon runner. Connected directed by Luke Gilford. The People Garden directed by Nadia Litz. In production and development; Vegan Boots.

Dave Bautista

David Michael Bautista, Jr. was born on January 18, 1969 in Washington, D.C., to Donna Raye (Mullins) and David Michael Bautista. His father is Filipino, and his mother has Greek ancestry.

When WCW officials told him he'd never make it in sports entertainment, Bautista pushed himself to achieve his dream of being a Superstar. In May 2002, he made his debut on SmackDown using the ring name Batista, but it wasn't until a move to Raw and two victories over Kane that "The Animal" began to make noise in the WWE Universe. The wins impressed Ric Flair and Triple H, who were looking to align themselves with the industry's brightest new stars. After a lengthy search, they identified Randy Orton and Batista. Collectively the four Superstars became known as Evolution.

Batista earned his first championship alongside "The Nature Boy" when the duo captured the WWE Tag Team Championships in December 2003. As Evolution dominated WWE, Batista started to emerge from the shadows of Triple H and Ric Flair. By the time Batista won the 2005 Royal Rumble Match, World Heavyweight Champion Triple H viewed him as a serious threat to his title.

After a triceps injury at the hands of Mark Henry forced Batista to relinquish the title in January 2006, he vowed to return. Batista successfully regained the World Heavyweight Championship at Survivor Series in 2006. Four months into his second reign, Batista faced the Undertaker at WrestleMania 23. "The Animal" took Undertaker to the limit, but was unable to stop the streak of "The Deadman" at WrestleMania. Though disappointed, Batista stayed hungry and always managed to keep himself in the championship hunt for the rest of his career.

At Bragging Rights in 2009, Batista shocked the world when he blamed Rey Mysterio for a loss to Undertaker, then attacked his former tag team partner. "The Animal" then became locked in a tense rivalry with another former friend, John Cena, over the WWE Championship. The grueling match at Over the Limit led to a wheelchair-bound Batista declaring "I quit!" the following night on Raw before fading from the WWE Universe in May 2010. Following his departure from WWE, Bautista appeared opposite Vin Diesel in the Universal film Riddick and RZA's feature directorial debut The Man with the Iron Fists, in which he played the villainous Brass Body and starred opposite Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu. His other film credits include The Scorpion King 3: Battle for Redemption, where he played Argomael; the action film House of the Rising Sun; and Wrong Side of Town opposite rapper Ja Rule.

Two years later, he joined MMA and won his first professional MMA fight. In January 2014, he made his long awaited return to the WWE, before quitting a second time in June of that same year. He did this in order to promote Guardians of the Galaxy, which was released on August 1, 2014, and starred Chris Pratt, Benicio Del Toro, Zoe Saldana, and Djimon Hounsou, alongside Bautista.

He will shoot Kickboxer: Vengeance, directed by John Stockwell, and co-starring martial artist Alain Moussi and UFC fighter Georges St-Pierre. The remake of the 1989 Jean-Claude Van Damme film, Kickboxer is about two brothers David and Kurt Sloan; When David wins the Karate World Championship, a promoter lures him to Hong Kong, despite his brother's protestations that the man is a crook. When Kurt travels to Thailand to meet his brother, he discovers he has died and seeks his revenge.

Sarah Silverman

Two-time Emmy Award winner Sarah Silverman is one of the most versatile talents in entertainment, with credits including that of actress, creator, writer, executive producer, comedian, and author. Silverman will next be seen in both The Book of Henry and The Lonely Island's Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping, both of which are set for release later this year. Silverman also continues to lend her voice to the Emmy-nominated Fox animated series Bob's Burgers and has a recurring role on the Golden Globe-nominated Showtime series Masters of Sex, which will return for its fourth season this year. Additionally, she is a part of JASH, a comedy collective on YouTube featuring original content by Silverman and friends Michael Cera, Tim & Eric, and Reggie Watts.

Silverman was most recently seen as the star of I Smile Back, the film adaptation of the Amy Koppelman novel. The drama premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival to critical acclaim and was later released in theaters by Broad Green Pictures. Silverman received much praise for her role as "Laney Brooks," culminating in a 2016 Screen Actors Guild Award nomination for "Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role." Her additional film credits include Ashby, A Million Ways to Die in the West, Take This Waltz, Gravy, Peep World, I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With, The School of Rock, There's Something About Mary, The Way of The Gun, and the Oscar-nominated smash hit Wreck It Ralph.

On stage, Silverman continues to cement her status as a force in stand up comedy. In 2013, she debuted her hour-long, critically-acclaimed HBO stand up special Sarah Silverman: We Are Miracles, which earned her the 2014 Primetime Emmy Award for "Outstanding Writing for a Variety Special." The special received an additional Primetime Emmy Awards nomination that year for "Outstanding Variety Special" in addition to a Writers Guild Awards nomination. In September 2014, Silverman released the special as an audio album through Sub Pop Records, which went on to receive a 2015 Grammy Awards nomination for "Best Comedy Album." Previously, Silverman made an impressive splash with her concert-meets-comedy film Sarah Silverman: Jesus is Magic, which garnered major attention at the Toronto Film Festival.

In 2010, she released her first book, a memoir called The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee. The book went on to become a New York Times Bestseller.

Silverman was nominated for a 2009 Primetime Emmy Award for "Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series" for her portrayal of a fictionalized version of herself in her Comedy Central series The Sarah Silverman Program. This marked Comedy Central's first ever Emmy nomination in a scripted acting category. Silverman also received a Writers Guild Award nomination for her work on the show. In 2008, Silverman won a Primetime Emmy Award for "Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics" for her musical collaboration with Matt Damon. Additionally, she was honored with a Webby Award for "Best Actress" for her online video "The Great Schlep," in which she persuaded young kids to encourage their grandparents in Florida to vote for President Obama prior to the 2008 Presidential Election.

Silverman has made memorable guest appearances on a number of acclaimed and notable television shows, including Monk, which earned her a 2008 Primetime Emmy Awards nomination for "Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series." Her additional television work includes The Good Wife, The Larry Sanders Show, Seinfeld, and Mr. Show with Bob and David. Silverman has also hosted a number of major awards shows, including the 2007 MTV Movie Awards and the Independent Spirit Awards.

Silverman grew up in New Hampshire and attended one year of New York University. In 1993 she joined Saturday Night Live as a writer and feature performer and has not stopped working since.

Lucy Liu

Born to immigrants in Queens, New York, Lucy Liu has always tried to balance an interest in her cultural heritage with a desire to move beyond a strictly Asian-American experience. Lucy's mother, Cecilia, a biochemist, is from Beijing, and her father, Tom Liu, a civil engineer, is from Shanghai. Once relegated to "ethnic" parts, the energetic actress is finally earning her stripes as an across-the-board leading lady.

Liu graduated from Stuyvesant High School in 1986 and enrolled in New York University; discouraged by the "dark and sarcastic" atmosphere of NYU, however, she transferred to the University of Michigan after her freshman year. She graduated from UM with a degree in Chinese Language and Culture, managing to squeeze in some additional training in dance, voice, fine arts, and acting. During her senior year, Liu auditioned for a small part in a production of Alice in Wonderland and walked away with the lead; encouraged by the experience, she decided to take the plunge into professional acting. She moved to Los Angeles and split her time between auditions and food service day jobs, eventually scoring a guest appearance as a waitress on Beverly Hills, 90210. That performance led to more walk-on parts in shows like NYPD Blue, ER, and The X-Files. In 1996, she was cast as an ambitious college student on Rhea Perlman's ephemeral sitcom Pearl.

Liu first appeared on the big screen as an ex-girlfriend in Jerry Maguire (she had previously filmed a scene in the indie Bang, but it was shelved for two years). She then waded through a series of supporting parts in small films before landing her big break on Ally McBeal. Liu initially auditioned for the role of Nelle Porter, which went to Portia de Rossi, but writer-producer David E. Kelley was so impressed with her that he promised to write a part for her in an upcoming episode. The part turned out to be that of growling, ill-tempered lawyer Ling Woo, which Liu filled with such aplomb that she was signed on as a regular cast member.

The "Ally" win gave Liu's film career a much-needed boost--in 1999, she was cast as a dominatrix in the Mel Gibson action flick Payback, and as a hitchhiker in the ill-received boxing saga Play It to the Bone. The next year brought even larger roles: first as the kidnapped Princess Pei Pei in Jackie Chan's western Shanghai Noon, then as one-third of the comely crime-fighting trio in Charlie's Angels.

When she's not hissing at clients or throwing well-coiffed punches, Liu keeps busy with an eclectic mix of off-screen hobbies. She practices the martial art of Kali-Eskrima-Silat (knife-and-stick fighting), skis, rock climbs, rides horses, and plays the accordion. In 1993 she exhibited a collection of multimedia art pieces at the Cast Iron Gallery in SoHo (New York), after which she won a grant to study and create art in China. Her hectic schedule doesn't leave much time for romantic intrigue, but Liu says she prefers to keep that side of her life uncluttered.

Scott Patterson

An accomplished actor in film, television and theater, Scott Patterson is well known to television audience from his seven seasons as diner owner Luke Danes in the hit series "Gilmore Girls."

Patterson now brings his many talents to the network's new comedy "Aliens In America," playing Gary Tolchuk, the aspiring entrepreneur dad of a Wisconsin family whose lives are turned upside down by the arrival of a Pakistani Muslim exchange student.

Patterson, born in Philadelphia and raised in New Jersey, attended Rutgers University and pursued a degree in comparative literature. He studied acting in New York with renowned coaches Robert Lewis and Sondra Lee and observed Paul Newman, Arthur Penn and Frank Corsaro at The Actors Studio, where he appeared in numerous productions. The theater company he founded in 1988 in New York City, Arc Light, produced the works of John Bishop, Sam Shepherd, Harold Pinter and Shakespeare.

Patterson recently completed filming on the upcoming horror feature "Saw IV." He appeared on the big screen in "Her Best Move," "Little Big League," "Three Wishes," "Highway 395" and "Rhapsody in Bloom."

On television, in addition to his memorable role as Luke on "Gilmore Girls," Patterson appeared on "Seinfeld," "Will & Grace," "It's Like, You Know" and "Fired Up." He has also guest starred on "Arli$$" and "Get Real," and voiced the character of Lieutenant Farraday in the 2004 animated series "Justice League Unlimited," from Warner Bros. Animation.

Patterson writes music and paints in his spare time. His gallery show of completed works will be announced in early 2008.

Patterson also collects art, artifacts and rare writings. His prehistoric petrified baby frog collection is on loan to the Louvre in Paris through 2010.

Patterson currently resides in Los Angeles.

Stephen King

Stephen Edwin King was born on September 21, 1947, at the Maine General Hospital in Portland. His parents were Nellie Ruth (Pillsbury), who worked as a caregiver at a mental institute, and Donald Edwin King, a merchant seaman. His father was born under the surname "Pollock", but used the last name "King", under which Stephen was born. He has an older brother, David. The Kings were a typical family until one night, when Donald said he was stepping out for cigarettes and was never heard from again. Ruth took over raising the family with help from relatives. They traveled throughout many states over several years, finally moving back to Durham, Maine, in 1958.

Stephen began his actual writing career in January of 1959, when David and Stephen decided to publish their own local newspaper named "Dave's Rag". David bought a mimeograph machine, and they put together a paper they sold for five cents an issue. Stephen attended Lisbon High School, in Lisbon, in 1962. Collaborating with his best friend Chris Chesley in 1963, they published a collection of 18 short stories called "People, Places, and Things--Volume I". King's stories included "Hotel at the End of the Road", "I've Got to Get Away!", "The Dimension Warp", "The Thing at the Bottom of the Well", "The Stranger", "I'm Falling", "The Cursed Expedition", and "The Other Side of the Fog." A year later, King's amateur press, Triad and Gaslight Books, published a two-part book titled "The Star Invaders".

King made his first actual published appearance in 1965 in the magazine Comics Review with his story "I Was a Teenage Grave Robber." The story ran about 6,000 words in length. In 1966 he graduated from high school and took a scholarship to attend the University of Maine. Looking back on his high school days, King recalled that "my high school career was totally undistinguished. I was not at the top of my class, nor at the bottom." Later that summer King began working on a novel called "Getting It On", about some kids who take over a classroom and try unsuccessfully to ward off the National Guard. During his first year at college, King completed his first full-length novel, "The Long Walk." He submitted the novel to Bennett Cerf/Random House only to have it rejected. King took the rejection badly and filed the book away.

He made his first small sale--$35--with the story "The Glass Floor". In June 1970 King graduated from the University of Maine with a Bachelor of Science degree in English and a certificate to teach high school. King's next idea came from the poem by Robert Browning, "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came." He found bright colored green paper in the library and began work on "The Dark Tower" saga, but his chronic shortage of money meant that he was unable to further pursue the novel, and it, too, was filed away. King took a job at a filling station pumping gas for the princely sum of $1.25 an hour. Soon he began to earn money for his writings by submitting his short stories to men's magazines such as Cavalier.

On January 2, 1971, he married Tabitha King (born Tabitha Jane Spruce). In the fall of 1971 King took a teaching job at Hampden Academy, earning $6,400 a year. The Kings then moved to Hermon, a town west of Bangor. Stephen then began work on a short story about a teenage girl named Carietta White. After completing a few pages, he decided it was not a worthy story and crumpled the pages up and tossed them into the trash. Fortunately, Tabitha took the pages out and read them. She encouraged her husband to continue the story, which he did. In January 1973 he submitted "Carrie" to Doubleday. In March Doubleday bought the book. On May 12 the publisher sold the paperback rights for the novel to New American Library for $400,000. His contract called for his getting half of that sum, and he quit his teaching job to pursue writing full time. The rest, as they say, is history.

Since then King has had numerous short stories and novels published and movies made from his work. He has been called the "Master of Horror". His books have been translated into 33 different languages, published in over 35 different countries. There are over 300 million copies of his novels in publication. He continues to live in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, and writes out of his home.

In June 1999 King was severely injured in an accident, he was walking alongside a highway and was hit by a car, that left him in critical condition with injuries to his lung, broken ribs, a broken leg and a severely fractured hip. After three weeks of operations, he was released from the Central Maine Medical Center in Lewiston.

Kether Donohue

A native New Yorker, Kether Donohue has received critical acclaim for her fearless performances in film, television and theatre. She has worked with a remarkable list of acclaimed directors, including Barry Levinson, Sam Mendes, Jason Moore, Paul Feig, Dennis Dugan, and James Burrows among others.

Donohue was last seen in theaters starring as Donna Thompson in Barry Levinson's sci-fi thriller The Bay (Lionsgate), and as Alice in the Jason Moore directed musical / comedy Pitch Perfect (Universal).

No stranger to television, she has been a series regular on the sitcom pilots Open Books (CBS) and Saving Jason (CW), a guest star on multiple episodes of Hope & Faith (ABC), Perfect Couples (NBC), I Just Want My Pants Back (MTV), Royal Pains (USA), Ringer (CW), The Mindy Project (FOX), and most recently The Carrie Diaries (CW).

In 2008, Donohue made her Off-Broadway debut at the prestigious Ensemble Studio Theatre playing a lead role in Taylor Mac's Okay. It was this performance that Variety coined her "the unstoppable Kether Donohue!" Immediately following the successful run of Okay, Donohue starred as 19-year-old Ava in the Off-Broadway show Blue Before Morning by Kate McGovern at the DR2 Theatre (produced by terraNOVA Collective), once again to the praise of critics.

As a major in film at Fordham University, Donohue directed, wrote, and starred in her own short film The Babydaddy, an autobiographical narrative about the relationship between a 16-year-old girl and her ill Vietnam Veteran father. The Babydaddy made its world premiere at the HBO sponsored G.I. Film Festival in Washington, D.C.

Donohue is also an accomplished voice artist. Her voice has been heard on several FoxKids, Nickelodeon, and DVD animations as well as television and radio commercials including promos for MTV.

On the commercial front, she starred with Tiger Woods in a national Gillette commercial, was the "haircut" girl in the iPhone 4 FaceTime spot, and was featured in national spots for AT&T, Macy's, Comcast, and others.

Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon was born Susan Abigail Tomalin in New York City, New York, to Lenora Marie (Criscione) and Phillip Leslie Tomalin, a television producer and advertising executive. She is of Italian (mother) and English, Irish, Welsh, and German (father) descent. Soon after the 1968 Democratic convention, there was a casting call for a film with several roles for the kind of young people who had disrupted the convention. Two recent graduates of Catholic University in Washington DC, went to the audition in New York for Joe. Chris Sarandon, who had studied to be an actor, was passed over. His wife Susan got a major role.

That role was as Susan Compton, the daughter of ad executive Bill Compton (Dennis Patrick). In the movie Dad Bill kills Susan's drug dealer boyfriend and next befriends Joe (Peter Boyle)-- a bigot who works on an assembly line and who collects guns.

Five years later, Sarandon made the film where fans of cult classics have come to know her as "Janet", who gets entangled with transvestite "Dr. Frank 'n' Furter" in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. More than 15 years after beginning her career Sarandon at last actively campaigned for a great role, Annie in Bull Durham, flying at her own expense from Rome to Los Angeles. "It was such a wonderful script ... and did away with a lot of myths and challenged the American definition of success", she said. "When I got there, I spent some time with Kevin Costner, kissed some ass at the studio and got back on a plane". Her romance with the Bull Durham supporting actor, Tim Robbins, had produced two sons by 1992 and put Sarandon in the position of leaving her domestic paradise only to accept roles that really challenged her. The result was four Academy Award nominations in the 1990s and best actress for Dead Man Walking. Her first Academy Award nomination was for Louis Malle's Atlantic City.

Mia Kirshner

Mia Kirshner was born in Toronto, Ontario on January 25, 1975, to Etti, a teacher, and Sheldon Kirshner, a journalist. Her father is of Polish Jewish descent and her mother is a Bulgarian Jewish immigrant. Mia had a middle class upbringing and graduated from the prestigious McGill University with a degree in English Literature. She had a love for acting from her school days at the Jarvis Institute, and her parents helped find her a talent agent at the age of 12.

By the age of 15, Mia was acting professionally and made her film debut in 1993 in Denys Arcand's Love and Human remains. Kirshner won a Genie nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a supporting role for her part in the film. Mia's performance also brought her to the attention of Atom Egoyan, who cast her as the female lead in the 1996 film Exotica. Mia's depiction of a sexy stripper in the film, won her critical acclaim, and by 1996 she established herself with an equally inspiring performance in The Crow: City of Angels.

Having established herself in Hollywood as a leading and versatile performer, Mia also appeared in the first three episodes of 24 as the assassin Mandy in 2001. She would later reprise the role for the second season's finale and in the latter half of the show's fourth season.[citation needed] Also in 2001, Kirshner played Catherine Wyler, The Cruelest Girl in School, in Not Another Teen Movie. The character is primarily a spoof of Kathryn Merteuil (played by Sarah Michelle Gellar) in Cruel Intentions, and was partially based on Mackenzie Siler (played by Anna Paquin) from She's All That. In Marilyn Manson's music video for "Tainted Love", which was featured on the movie's soundtrack, she made a cameo appearance as her character Catherine Wyler.

In 2004, Kirshner was cast as author Jenny Schecter, a main character in the drama series The L Word. She remained with the show for all of the show's six seasons through 2009. She won several awards for her role as Jenny Schecter, and a world-wide fan base which followed her character throughout the seasons of the L Word.

In 2006, Mia starred in Brian De Palma's The Black Dahlia in which she plays the young aspiring actress, Elizabeth Short, who was mysteriously mutilated and murdered in 1947. While the film itself was critically panned, many reviews singled out her performance for acclaim. In 2010, Kirshner co-starred in the film 30 Days of Night: Dark Days which began filming in the fall of 2009. In 2010, she was cast as Isobel Fleming, a guest role on The Vampire Diaries.

In 2011, she voiced the title character in Bear 71, a National Film Board of Canada web documentary that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.

On April 20, 2012, it was announced that Kirshner would join the new Syfy series Defiance.

Kirshner was ranked #43 on the Maxim Hot 100 Women of 2002. She and Beverly Polcyn were nominated for Best Kiss at the 2002 MTV Movie Awards for Not Another Teen Movie. In 2012 it was announced that Kirshner would be the face of Monica Rich Kosann's jewelry collection.

Already established as Canada's most decorated female performer, Mia is also a decorated writer, winning acclaim for her 2007 book I Live Here.

Melissa Joan Hart

Melissa grew up in Sayville, New York. Her acting career started at the age of four, when she did a commercial for a bathtub toy called Splashy. Her mother, Paula Hart, has been her agent from the beginning. Melissa is the oldest of eight children, some from her mother's second marriage. Six sisters, Trisha Hart, Elizabeth Hart, Emily Hart, Alexandra Hart-Gilliams, Samantha Hart, and Mackenzie Hart who is the only sibling who never appeared on Melissa's TV series Sabrina, the Teenage Witch. Her brother is Brian Hart.

Melissa performed in two plays as the youngest member of New York's Circle Repertory Lab Company: "Beside Herself" in 1989 (starring Lois Smith and William Hurt) and "Imagining Brad" in 1990. She was also in the National Actors Theater production of "The Crucible" on Broadway with Martin Sheen (as understudy of three of the children in the play). Melissa cites Shirley Temple and Audrey Hepburn as early acting inspirations and still collects memorabilia of the former. For the past few years, she has been juggling acting and attending New York University. She's now living in Connecticut.

Robbie Coltrane

Robbie Coltrane, one of Britain's most popular comedians who was head of debating society at school and won prizes for his art, is now a film star who played in two James Bond films and in the "Harry Potter" franchise.

Coltrane was born Anthony Robert McMillan on March 30, 1950, in Rutherglen, a suburb of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. His mother, Jean Ross (Howie), was a teacher and pianist. His father, Ian Baxter McMillan, was a general surgeon who also worked for police pathology. Young Robbie was fond of art, music, films and cars. He was a voracious reader of his dad's books on medicine and crime. At age 12 he made his acting debut on stage at Glenalmond College, delivering rants from "Henry V". At that time he was fascinated with Marlon Brando and Orson Welles.

He attended Glasgow Art School, majoring in drawing, painting and film, then studied art at Edinburgh's Moray House College of Education for a year. In 1973 he made a documentary titled "Young Mental Health", which was voted Film Of The Year by the Scottish Education Council. At that time Robbie took the name Coltrane, due to his love of jazz, and began a career of a stand-up comedian at night clubs, at the Edinburgh Festival, as well as an actor with Edinburgh's renowned Traverse Theatre.

In 1980 Coltrane made his debut on television as "Border Guard" in BBC's mini-series The Lost Tribe, then made his big screen debut as a limousine driver in Death Watch. In 1981 he appeared in his first leading role as Detective Fritz Langley in Subway Riders, by famed underground director Amos Poe.

He became a well-known face through appearances in The Comic Strip series, then in Alfresco and Comic Strip movies The Supergrass and The Pope Must Diet, among other films. At that time Coltrane had a drinking problem, downing as much as a bottle of whiskey a day. In 1986 he flew to a clinic in Mexico and was treated for obesity. In 1987 his partner for 15 years, Robin Paine, left him for good, leaving her portrait in Coltrane's barn.

In 1988 Coltrane met then 18-year-old Rhona Gemmell in a pub. They married and had a son, Spencer, and a daughter, Alice. His career took off during the early 1990s with the leading role as Dr. Eddie "Fitz" Fitzgerald, a forensic psychologist, in the popular TV series Cracker.

He made such a good performance as Valentin Zukovsky, a KGB man turned St. Petersburg mafia lord, in GoldenEye the producers called him back for the same character in The World Is Not Enough. Then Coltrane hit another lucrative franchise; he was personally selected by J.K. Rowling as her choice to play half-giant Rubeus Hagrid in the 'Harry Potter' films.

In early 1990s Coltrane wrote an autobiography, "Coltrane in a Cadillac", and also starred in the eponymous TV series, Coltrane in a Cadillac, in which he indulges his passion for vintage cars and tells with great humor about his 4000-mile journey across America from Los Angeles to New York. In 2003 he separated from his wife. His interests outside of his acting profession has been reading books, and rebuilding and collecting vintage cars. Robbie Coltrane resides in a converted farmhouse in Stirlingshire, Scotland, UK.

Paul Thomas Anderson

Anderson was born in 1970. He was one of the first of the "video store" generation of film-makers. His father was the first man on his block to own a V.C.R., and from a very early age Anderson had an infinite number of titles available to him. While film-makers like Spielberg cut their teeth making 8 mm films, Anderson cut his teeth shooting films on video and editing them from V.C.R. to V.C.R.

Part of Anderson's artistic D.N.A. comes from his father, who hosted a late night horror show in Cleveland. His father knew a number of oddball celebrities such as Robert Ridgely, an actor who often appeared in Mel Brooks' films and would later play "The Colonel" in Anderson's Boogie Nights. Anderson was also very much shaped by growing up in "The Valley", specifically the suburban San Fernando Valley of greater Los Angeles. The Valley may have been immortalized in the 1980s for its mall-hopping "Valley Girls", but for Anderson it was a slightly seedy part of suburban America. You were close to Hollywood, yet you weren't there. Would-bes and burn-outs populated the area. Anderson's experiences growing up in "The Valley" have no doubt shaped his artistic self, especially since three of his four theatrical features are set in the Valley.

Anderson got into film-making at a young age. His most significant amateur film was The Dirk Diggler Story, a sort of mock-documentary a la This Is Spinal Tap, about a once-great pornography star named Dirk Diggler. After enrolling in N.Y.U.'s film program for two days, Anderson got his tuition back and made his own short film, Cigarettes & Coffee. He also worked as a production assistant on numerous commercials and music videos before he got the chance to make his first feature, something he liked to call Hard Eight, but would later become known to the public as "Hard Eight". The film was developed and financed through The Sundance Lab, not unlike Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs. Anderson cast three actors whom he would continue working with in the future: Altman veteran Philip Baker Hall, the husky and lovable John C. Reilly and, in a small part, Philip Seymour Hoffman, who so far has been featured in all four of Anderson's films. The film deals with a guardian angel type (played by Hall) who takes down-on-his-luck Reilly under his wing. The deliberately paced film featured a number of Anderson trademarks: wonderful use of source light, long takes and top-notch acting. Yet the film was reedited (and retitled) by Rysher Entertainment against Anderson's wishes. It was admired by critics, but didn't catch on at the box office. Still, it was enough for Anderson to eventually get his next movie financed. "Boogie Nights" was, in a sense, a remake of "The Dirk Diggler Story", but Anderson threw away the satirical approach and instead painted a broad canvas about a makeshift family of pornographers. The film was often joyous in its look at the 1970s and the days when pornography was still shot on film, still shown in theatres, and its actors could at least delude themselves into believing that they were movie stars. Yet "Boogie Nights" did not flinch at the dark side, showing a murder and suicide, literally in one (almost) uninterrupted shot, and also showing the lives of these people deteriorate, while also showing how their lives recovered.

Anderson not only worked with Hall, Reilly and Hoffman again, he also worked with Julianne Moore, Melora Walters, William H. Macy and Luis Guzmán. Collectively, Anderson had something that was rare in U.S. cinema: a stock company of top-notch actors. Aside from the above mentioned, Anderson also drew terrific performances from Burt Reynolds and Mark Wahlberg, two actors whose careers were not exactly going full-blast at the time of "Boogie Nights", but who found themselves to be that much more employable afterwards.

The success of "Boogie Nights" gave Anderson the chance to really go for broke in Magnolia, a massive mosaic that could dwarf Altman's Nashville in its number of characters.

Anderson was awarded a "Best Director" award at Cannes for Punch-Drunk Love.

Willem Dafoe

Willem Dafoe was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, to Muriel Isabel (Sprissler), a nurse, and Dr. William Alfred Dafoe, a surgeon. He is of German, French, English, Irish, and Scottish descent. In 1979, Dafoe was given a small role in Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate from which he was fired. His first feature role came shortly after in Kathryn Bigelow's The Loveless. From there, he went on to perform in over 80 films - in Hollywood (John Carter, Spider-Man, The English Patient, Finding Nemo, Once Upon a Time in Mexico, Clear and Present Danger, White Sands, Mississippi Burning, Streets of Fire, American Dreamz) and in independent cinema in the U.S. (The Clearing, Animal Factory, The Boondock Saints, American Psycho) and abroad (Theo Angelopoulos' The Dust of Time, Yim Ho's Pavilion of Women, Yurek Bogayevicz's Edges of the Lord, Wim Wenders' Faraway, So Close, Nobuhiro Suwa's segment of Paris, je t'aime, Brian Gilbert's Tom & Viv, Christian Carion's Farewell, _Mr. Bean's Holiday and The Spierig Brothers' Daybreakers_, Daniel Nettheim's The Hunter). He has chosen projects for diversity of roles and opportunities to work with strong directors. He has worked in the films of Wes Anderson (The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, Fantastic Mr. Fox), Martin Scorsese (The Aviator, The Last Temptation of Christ), Spike Lee (Inside Man), Julian Schnabel (Miral, Basquiat), Paul Schrader (Auto Focus, Affliction, Light Sleeper, The Walker, Adam Resurrected), David Cronenberg (eXistenZ), Abel Ferrara (4:44 Last Day on Earth, Go Go Tales, New Rose Hotel), David Lynch (Wild at Heart), William Friedkin (To Live and Die in L.A.), Werner Herzog (My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done, Oliver Stone (Born on the Fourth of July, Platoon), Giada Colagrande (A Woman and Before It Had a Name) and Lars von Trier (Antichrist and Manderlay). He was nominated twice for the Academy Award (Platoon and Shadow of the Vampire) and once for the Golden Globe. Among other nominations and awards, he received an LA Film Critics Award and an Independent Spirit Award. Upcoming films include Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel, Anton Corbjin's A Most Wanted Man, Lars von Trier's Nymphomaniac: Vol. I, Scott Cooper's Out of the Furnace Josh Boone's The Fault In Our Stars (2014)_, David Leitch and Chad Stahelski's John Wick (2014)_, and Chris Brinker's Bad Country. Dafoe is one of the founding members of The Wooster Group, the New York based experimental theatre collective. He created and performed in all of the group's work from 1977 thru 2005, both in the U.S. and internationally. Since then, he worked with Richard Foreman in Idiot Savant at The Public Theatre (NYC) and most recently the international productions of Robert Wilson's The Life & Death of Marina Abramovic abroad and Robert Wilson's The Old Woman with Mikhail Baryshnikov.

Kim Darby

The child of professional dancers, Kim Darby began her career studying dance with her father, as well as Nico Charisse. At fourteen, she was granted special admission to Tony Barr's acting workshop at Desilu Studios on the Paramount Pictures lot. He wrote later that it was her remarkable openness, honesty, emotional readiness and focus that convinced him to bring her into his adult class. These traits have become the signature of her work in a career that has now spanned a period of more than forty years.

As a teenager, she earned her first acting roles in episodes of television shows, including Mr. Novak, Dr. Kildare, The Eleventh Hour, Star Trek and The Fugitive. Her reputation continued to grow with more work in film and television.

She was twenty-one when producer Hal B. Wallis saw her in an episode of Run for Your Life and decided to offer her the coveted role of "Mattie Ross", opposite John Wayne's "Rooster Cogburn", in True Grit. The classic western earned Wayne his only Oscar and made Kim Darby a film star.

Ms. Darby went on to star in a variety of productions, receiving a Golden Globe nomination for her work in Generation, and an Emmy Nomination for her role in Rich Man, Poor Man. Her feature films include The Strawberry Statement, The Grissom Gang, Better Off Dead... and Mockingbird Don't Sing; television movies include The Story of Pretty Boy Floyd, Don't Be Afraid of the Dark and Enola Gay: The Men, the Mission, the Atomic Bomb.

Still acting, since 1990, she has also been teaching her craft and is asked to give seminars at universities and film schools throughout the country. Her own training and lifelong experience over the last four decades has provided her with a rich perspective as well as a diverse collection of skills which she enjoys sharing with enthusiastic students.

Julie Walters

For decades, Brit actress and comedienne Julie Walters has served as a sturdy representation of the working class with her passionate, earthy portrayals on England's stage, screen and TV. A bona fide talent, her infectious spirit and self-deprecating sense of humor eventually captured the hearts of international audiences. The small and slender actress with the prominent cheekbones has yet to give an uninteresting performance.

She was born Julia Mary Walters on February 22, 1950 in Smethwick, West Midlands, England, the youngest of three children and only daughter of Mary Bridget (O'Brien), an Irish-born postal clerk from County Mayo, and Thomas Walters, an English-born builder, from Birmingham. Convent schooled in Birmingham, she expressed an early desire to act. Her iron-willed mother had other ideas, however, and geared her towards a nursing career. Dutifully applying at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, Julie eventually gave up nursing when the pull to be an actress proved too strong. Studying English and Drama at Manchester Polytechnic, she subsequently joined a theatre company in Liverpool and apprenticed as a stand-up comic. A one-time company member of the Vanload improv troupe, she made her London stage debut in the aptly-titled comedy "Funny Peculiar" in 1975, and went on to develop a successfully bawdy act on the cabaret circuit. While at Manchester, Julie befriended aspiring writer/comedienne Victoria Wood and the twosome appeared together in sketch comedy. A couple of their works, "Talent" and "Nearly a Happy Ending," transferred to TV and were accompanied by rave reviews. Eventually they were handed their own TV series, Wood and Walters.

In 1980, Julie scored a huge solo success under the theatre lights when she made her London debut in Willy Russell's "Educating Rita." For her superlative performance she won both the Variety Critic's and London Critic's Circle Awards as the young hairdresser who vows to up her station in life by enrolling in a university. She conquered film as well when Educating Rita transferred to the big screen opposite Michael Caine as her Henry Higgins-like college professor, collecting a Golden Globe Award and Oscar nomination.

Reuniting with Victoria Wood in 1984, the pair continue to appear together frequently on TV, most recently with the award-winning series Dinnerladies. On stage Julie has impressed in a variety of roles ranging from the contemporary ("Fool for Love," "Frankie and Johnny at the Clair de Lune") to the classics ("Macbeth," "The Rose Tattoo" and "All My Sons"), winning the Olivier Award for the last-mentioned play.

Following her success as Rita, she immediately rolled out a sterling succession of film femmes including her seedy waitress-turned-successful brothel-owner in Personal Services; the unsophisticated, small-town wife of Phil Collins in Buster; a boozy, man-chasing mum in Killing Dad or How to Love Your Mother; and Liza Minnelli's abrasive tap student in Stepping Out. Playing a wide variety of ages, she also mustered up a very convincing role as the mother of Joe Orton in the critically-acclaimed Prick Up Your Ears. She capped her career in films as the abrasively stern but encouraging dance teacher in Billy Elliot which earned her a second Oscar nod and a healthy helping of quirky character parts, including her charming, charity-driven widow who poses à la natural in Calendar Girls, and the maternal witch-wife Molly Weasley in the J.K. Rowling "Harry Potter" series. For her work on film and TV, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts has honored Julie five times, including four awards in a row (2001-2004).

Married to Grant Roffey since 1997 after a 12-year relationship, the couple tend to a 70-acre organic farm they bought in Sussex. They have one child. Julie was honored with an OBE for her services to drama in 1999. A biography was published in 2003 entitled "Julie Walters: Seriously Funny."

Thomas F. Wilson

Tom Wilson is a creative artist whose professional career has explored almost every imaginable artistic discipline, blending them into a unique and very individual declaration of a life in the arts. A man of fervent but private faith his whole life, the last few years have been interesting, with hundreds of invitations to speak at conferences and retreats, as well as the opportunity to record the music that he began playing in church in the 1970s. Tom has enjoyed a successful career as an actor, writer and comedian for over 20 years. He has more than 50 films, television shows and comedy specials to his credit, and has appeared on talk shows with everyone from Johnny Carson to Jay Leno to David Letterman to Regis Philbin and Kathie Lee Gifford. As a voice-over actor, he has worked in dozens of animated series, including many episodes of Nickelodeon's SpongeBob SquarePants. As a comedian he has been a regular performer at the world-famous Improv and Comedy Store since the day he arrived in Hollywood. His self-written one-man show, "Cowboy Tommy," boasted a series of sold-out engagements. He continues to act in movies and television, and he performs comedy and music at theaters across America. As a writer and producer, he's written for several prestigious literary magazines, as well as for Universal Studios, Disney, Fox and Film Roman studios, and produced a groundbreaking series of debates for Canadian television called "The Seven Deadly Sins", which examined cultural values and the role of the arts within them. As an avocation, he is a photographer and painter, with a photograph in the permanent collection of the California Museum of Photography and paintings on the walls of the guest bedrooms of many close personal friends (or, as artists like to say, "in many private collections.") Actor, comedian, writer, musician, and artist - Tom Wilson has transcended the limitations of pop-cultural celebrity to become an artist of honesty, gravity and grace. Thomas is a graduate of Radnor high school in the suburbs of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was known for his comedic personality.

Roddy McDowall

Roderick McDowall was born in London, the son of a Merchant Mariner father and a mother who had always wanted to be in movies. He was enrolled in elocution courses at age five and by ten had appeared in his first film, Murder in the Family, playing Peter Osborne, the younger brother of sisters played by Jessica Tandy and Glynis Johns. His mother brought Roddy and his sister to the US at the beginning of World War II, and he soon got the part of Huw, youngest child in a family of Welsh coal miners, in John Ford's How Green Was My Valley, acting alongside Walter Pidgeon, Maureen O'Hara and Donald Crisp in the film that won that year's best film Oscar. He went on to many other child roles, in films like My Friend Flicka and Lassie Come Home until, at age 18, he moved to New York, where he played a long series of successful stage roles, both on Broadway and in such venues as Connecticut's Stratford Festival, where he did Shakespeare. In addition to making many more movies (over 150), McDowall acted in television, developed an extensive collection of movies and Hollywood memorabilia, and published five acclaimed books of his own photography. He died at his Los Angeles home, aged 70, of cancer.

Mary-Kate Olsen

Mary-Kate Olsen (born June 13, 1986) is an American actress, fashion designer, producer, author, and businesswoman. She co-founded luxury fashion brands The Row, Elizabeth and James, and the more affordable lines Olsenboye and StyleMint alongside her fraternal twin sister Ashley Olsen. Olsen pursued acting independently as an adult until 2012. She is the older sister of actress Elizabeth Olsen.

Mary-Kate was born in Sherman Oaks, California, the daughter of Jarnette "Jarnie", a personal manager, and David "Dave" Olsen, a real estate developer and mortgage banker. Along with her twin, Ashley, she has an older brother, Trent, a younger sister, Elizabeth Olsen, and two half siblings from her father's second marriage. Olsen's parents divorced in 1996.

Along with Ashley, Olsen was cast at the age of nine months to share the role of Michelle Tanner on the ABC sitcom Full House. The Olsen twins portrayed Michelle throughout the series' 1987-95 run. In the early 1990s, she and Ashley established a company, Dualstar, which produced a long string of TV movies and direct-to-video releases featuring the girls. The Olsens continued to release direct-to-video films up to the early 2000s, along with starring in the 1995 feature film It Takes Two. In 1997, the Olsen twins guest starred in an episode of Sister, Sister, alongside rival twin actresses Tia Mowry and Tamera Mowry. After Full House, the sisters starred in two other sitcoms (Two of a Kind and So Little Time) and an animated series (Mary-Kate and Ashley in Action!). The former lasted one season while the latter ran for two seasons. These ventures, combined with an array of licensing deals for their names and likenesses, made Olsen wealthy at a young age. In 2004, Olsen's wealth was estimated at $137 million.

Olsen and her sister became co-presidents of Dualstar upon their eighteenth birthday. Olsen's first solo acting appearance was in the movie Factory Girl, released in December 2006. Olsen's one short scene was ultimately cut from theatrical release, but was included on the film's DVD. In 2007, the sisters said that if they became involved in movies together again it would be as producers. Olsen had a recurring role on Weeds . In 2008, she appeared in The Wackness. At the Sundance Film Festival, Academy Award-winner Sir Ben Kingsley, her co-star' praised her. In 2008 Olsen also made a guest appearance on the ABC comedy Samantha Who? as a self-destructive girl that Samantha tries to help. Olsen appeared in the motion picture adaption of the Alex Flinn novel Beastly. Beastly was Mary-Kate's final acting project.

In March 2012, both Mary-Kate and Ashley indicated their interest to retire as actresses in order to focus on their careers in fashion. Mary-Kate and Ashley felt that their futures were in fashion, and not in acting. They discussed wanting to open a store as one of their future fashion-based endeavors.

In 2015 it was announced that John Stamos signed on with Netflix to produce and co-star in Fuller House, a spin-off Full House that would reunite the original cast members for a 13-episode series. Mary-Kate and Ashley originally announced in May 2015 that they will not reprise their role as Michelle Tanner.

Nickelodeon acquired the rights to the Olsen twins' video library in 2015.

In 1993, following Mary-Kate and Ashley's success on Full House, a limited liability company, Dualstar was created to produce Mary-Kate and Ashley-branded products.

In 2004, both Mary-Kate and Ashley took control of Dualstar, becoming joint-CEOs and presidents of the company, which at the time had its merchandise being carried in over 3,000 stores in America and 5,300 stores worldwide.

Mary-Kate and her twin Ashley's success has been marked by their inclusion on every Forbes The Celebrity 100 list since 2002. In 2007 Forbes ranked the twins jointly as the eleventh-richest women in entertainment, with an estimated combined net worth of $100 million.

Following a high volume of public interest in their fashion choices, the sisters began work in collaboration on a string of fashion lines available to the public. Starting as young girls, the Olsen twins started a clothing line in Wal-Mart stores across America for girls ages 4 to 14 as well as a beauty line called "Mary-Kate and Ashley: Real fashion for real girls". In 2004 they made news by signing a pledge to allow all the workers that sew their line of clothing in Bangladesh full maternity leave. The National Labor Committee, which organized the pledge, later praised the twins for their commitment to worker rights.

In 2006, in an attempt to gain credibility in the fashion industry after their association with Wal-Mart tarnished their reputations, they were tapped as the faces of the upscale fashion line Badgley Mischka.

As adults, the Olsen twins have devoted much of their attention to the world of fashion. They head a couture fashion label, "The Row," as well as "Elizabeth and James", "Olsenboye", and "StyleMint" retail collections. Mary-Kate's sometimes controversial fashion choices have often found her on both the best and worst dressed fashion lists, particularly for her decision to wear fur. Mary-Kate and Ashley designed an Olsenboye Change Purse in 2011 and donated the money to "Pennies From Heaven".

In 2011, Mary-Kate and Ashley teamed up with TOMS Shoes to design footwear for kids without shoes in more than 20 countries worldwide. Mary-Kate and Ashley are now the creative directors for Superga. Mary-Kate and Ashley released an Elizabeth and James perfume in Spring 2013. They won the top prize at the 2012 CFDA Fashion Awards. StyleMint is now available in the UK.

In October 2012, Mary-Kate and Ashley won the WSJ magazine Innovator of The Year Award.

Mary Kate was nominated for Council Of Fashion Designers in 2015.

In 2008, the Olsen twins co-authored Influence, a book featuring interviews with fashion designers that have inspired the twins' fashion lines.

Olsen has dated David Katzenberg, son of DreamWorks co-founder Jeffrey Katzenberg; photographer Maxwell Snow; and artist Nate Lowman.

In May 2012, Olsen began a relationship with Olivier Sarkozy, half brother of former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. In March 2014, photos were published showing Olsen wearing what appeared to be an engagement ring. Olsen and Sarkozy were married on November 27, 2015 at a private residence in New York City.

In 2014, Olsen competed in the Hamptons Horse Show. In 2013, her horse Marvelous competed in and won the 38th Hampton Classic Horse Show.

In mid-2004, Olsen announced she had entered treatment for anorexia nervosa. A Got Milk? ad featuring the twins was pulled following the announcement. On November 20, 2007, she was hospitalized for a reported kidney infection.

Mary-Kate was a close friend of late actor Heath Ledger. After discovering Ledger unconscious in his bed in January 2008, his masseuse called Olsen twice before contacting police. Olsen sent a private security guard to the scene.

Responding to a claim by an anonymous law enforcement official that she would not speak to federal investigators without a promise of legal immunity, Olsen's attorney Michael C. Miller said, "We have provided the government with relevant information including facts in the chronology of events surrounding Mr. Ledger's death and the fact that Ms. Olsen does not know the source of the drugs Mr. Ledger consumed".

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand is an American singer, actress, director and producer and one of the most successful personalities in show business. She is the only person ever to receive all of the following: Oscar, Tony, Emmy, Grammy, Golden Globe, Cable Ace, National Endowment for the Arts, and Peabody awards, as well as the American Film Institutes Lifetime Achievement honor and the Film Society of Lincoln Center Chaplin Award.

She was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1942 to Diana (née Ida Rosen), a singer turned school secretary, and Emanuel Streisand, a high school teacher. Her father was of Galician (Polish) Jewish descent and her mother was of Russian Jewish ancestry. As a child she attended the Beis Yakov Jewish School in Brooklyn. She was raised in a middle-class family and grew up dreaming of becoming an actress (or even an actress / conductor, as she happily described her teenage years at one of her concerts).

After a period as a nightclub singer and off-Broadway performer in New York City she began to attract interest and a fan base, thanks to her original and powerful vocal talent. She debuted on Broadway in the 1962 musical comedy "I Can Get It For You Wholesale" by Harold Rome, receiving a Tony Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress and a New York Drama Critics Poll award. The following year she reached great commercial success with her first Columbia Records solo releases, "The Barbra Streisand Album" (multiple Grammy winner, including "Best Album of the Year") and "The Second Barbra Streisand Album" (her first RIAA Gold Album); these albums, mostly devoted to composer Harold Arlen, brought her critical praise and, most of all, public acclaim all over the US. In 1964 she continued ha another smash Broadway hit when she portrayed legendary Broadway star Fanny Brice in "Funny Girl" by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill; the show's main song, "People". became her first hit and she appeared on the cover of "Time" magazine. After many TV appearances as guest on various music and variety shows (such as an episode of The Judy Garland Show, for which she was nominated for 1963 Emmy), she signed an exclusive contract with CBS for a series of annual TV specials : My Name Is Barbra (which won an Emmy) and Color Me Barbra her first work in color were extremely successful.

After a brief London stage period and the birth of her son Jason Gould (with then-husband Elliott Gould), in summer 1967 she gave a memorable free concert in New York City, "A Happening in Central Park", that was filmed and later broadcast (in an edited version) as a TV special; then she flew to Hollywood for her first movie, Funny Girl, a filming of her stage success. The picture, directed by William Wyler, opened in 1968 and became a hit in the US and abroad, making her an international "superstar' and multiple award winner, including an Oscar (her first) as Best Actress. After a series of screen musicals, such as _Gene Kelly (I)''s _Hello Dolly (1969)_ and Vincente Minnelli's On a Clear Day You Can See Forever, she wanted to try comedies, resulting in such films as The Owl and the Pussycat and What's Up, Doc?. She turned to dramas and turned out Up the Sandbox and the classic The Way We Were, directed by Sydney Pollack and co-starring Robert Redford, in which she gave what many consider to be her finest performance. The song "The Way We Were" (written by Marvin Hamlisch and Alan Bergman and Marilyn Bergman) became one of her biggest hits and most memorable and famous songs.

She returned to TV for a new special conceived as a musical journey covering many world musical styles, Barbra Streisand and Other Musical Instruments, then returned (for contractual reasons) to her Fanny Brice role in a sequel to her hit "Funny Girl film, Funny Lady, and the next year turned out one of her most personal film projects, A Star Is Born, one of the biggest hits of the year for which she won a Golden Globe for Best Actress and her second Oscar, for the song "Evergreen". Always extremely busy on the discography side, averaging one album a year throughout the '70s and '80s, she had a string of successful singles and albums, such as "You Don't Bring Me Flowers" (duet with 'Neil Diamond'), "Enough is Enough" (with Donna Summer), "The Main Event" (from her film The Main Event with her friend Ryan O'Neal) and the album "Guilty", written for her by The Bee Gees' Barry Gibb, which sold more than 10 million copies worldwide.

She debuted as a director with the musical drama Yentl, in which she also portrayed a Jewish girl who is forced to pass herself off as a man to pursue her dreams. The movie received generally positive reviews and the beautiful score by Michel Legrand and lyricists Marilyn Bergman and Alan Bergman stands up as one of Streisand's finest musical works. The film received several Oscar nominations, winning in two categories, but she was not nominated as Best Director, which disappointed both her and her fans, many of whom consider this the Academy's biggest "snub".

In 1985 her album "The Broadway Album was an unexpected runaway success, winning a Grammy Award and helping to introduce a new generation to the world of American musical theater. In 1986 she performed in a memorable concert, after 20 years of stage silence, "One Voice" (1986). She returned to the screen in the Nuts, a drama directed by Martin Ritt, in the role of a prostitute accused of murder who fights to avoid being labeled "insane" at her trial. In she appeared in The Prince of Tides, which many consider to be the pinnacle of her screen career, playing a psychiatrist who tries to help a man (Nick Nolte) to find the pieces of his past life: the film received seven Oscar nominations (but again NOT for Best Directing), but she did receive a nomination from the DGA (Directors Guild of America) for Best Director. In 1994 she returned to the stage after 27 years for a series of sold-out concerts (for the televised version of one of these, she won another Emmy).

In the 1990s she broke several personal records: with two #1 albums ("Back to Broadway" in 1993 and "Higher Ground" in 1997) and became the only artist to achieve a #1 album on the Billboard charts in the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s and 1990s (she extended this record into the 21st century in 2009 with the jazz album "Love is the Answer"). In 1996 she starred in her third and last picture as director, The Mirror Has Two Faces, with Jeff Bridges and Lauren Bacall. The film had a "the girl got the guy" ending, and the same happened to her in real life--the next year she married well known TV actor James Brolin.

In 2000 she focused her career again on concerts ("Timeless") and in 2006-07 with a European tour. She made only two more films--a supporting role as a sex therapist mother in the Ben Stiller comedy Meet the Fockers and its sequel, Little Fockers, alongside Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro. She published a book, "Passion for Design", in 2010 and celebrated her friendship with the Bergmans with an entire album of their songs, "What Matters Most" (2011), that debuted in the top 10.

After a long break from filming, she returned in a starring role for the 2012 holiday season with The Guilt Trip, a mother/son picture co-starring Seth Rogen and directed by Anne Fletcher, and is working on putting together a film version of the well-known Jule Styne musical "Gypsy". In almost 50 years of career, Streisand has contributed to the show business industry in a personal and unique way, collecting a multi-generational fan base; she has a powerful and recognize vocal range, and a raucous and often self-deprecating sense of humor, which doesn't prevent her from showing the serious and dramatic sides of her personality. Her strong political belief in social justice infuses her professional career and personal life, and she makes no bones about what she believes; her willingness to put her money where her mouth is has resulted in some truly vicious attacks by many who hold opposite political views, but that hasn't stopped her from acting on her beliefs. She has been honored with the Humanitarian Award from the Human Rights Campaign, an Honorary Doctorate in Arts and Humanities from Brandeis University in 1995, an Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2013 and the bestowing by the government of France the title of Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters. She supports many humanitarian causes through the Streisand Foundation and has been a dedicated environmentalist for many years; she endowed a chair in environmental studies in 1987 and donated her 24-acre estate to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. In addition, she was the lead founder for the Clinton Climate Change Initiative. This effort brought together a consortium of major cities around the world to drive down greenhouse gas emissions. She is a leading spokesperson and fund-raiser for social and political causes close to her heart and has often dedicated proceeds from her live concert performances to benefit programs she supports.

Griffin Gluck

Griffin Gluck may only be going into ninth grade, but he has already acquired an impressive collection of credits, such as feature films "Just Go With It" and "Trust Me" and TV series "Back In The Game," "Private Practice," "The Office" and "United States of Tara." A clip of his recent guest-star appearance on cable's "Silicon Valley" went viral.

Gluck got the acting bug when he went to a summer children's showcase of "Guys and Dolls" at the Palisades Playhouse. Since then, he has appeared in several TV commercials for the Japanese and American markets, including Verizon's "Lemonade Stand" and a national campaign for Eggo. In 2008, he appeared in the Japanese remake of the film "Sideways," directed by his father.

Gluck lives in Los Angeles with his sister, Caroline, his director father, Cellin Gluck, and his producer mother, Karin Beck.

Robert Rodriguez

Robert Anthony Rodriguez was born and raised in San Antonio, Texas, USA, to Rebecca (Villegas), a nurse, and Cecilio G. Rodríguez, a salesman. His family is of Mexican descent.

Of all the people to be amazed by the images of John Carpenter's 1981 sci-fi parable, Escape from New York, none were as captivated as the 12-year-old Rodriguez, who sat with his friends in a crowded cinema. Many people watch films and arrogantly proclaim "I can do that." This young man said something different: "I WILL do that. I'm gonna make movies." The young man in question is Robert Rodriguez and this day was the catalyst of his dream career. Born and raised in Texas, Robert was the middle child of a family that would include 10 children. While many-a-child would easily succumb to a Jan Brady-sense of being lost in the shuffle, Robert always stood out as a very creative and very active young man. An artist by nature, he was very rarely seen sans pencil-in-hand doodling some abstract (yet astounding) dramatic feature on a piece of paper. His mother, not a fan of the "dreary" cinema of the 1970s, instills a sense of cinema in her children by taking them on weekly trips to San Antonio's famed Olmos Theatre movie house and treats them to a healthy dose of Hollywood's "Golden Age" wonders, from Sergio Leone to the silent classic of Charles Chaplin and Buster Keaton.

In a short amount of time, young Robert finds the family's old Super-8 film camera and makes his first films. The genres are unlimited: action, sci-fi, horror, drama, stop-motion animation. He uses props from around the house, settings from around town, and makes use of the largest cast and crew at his disposal: his family. At the end of the decade, his father, a salesman, brings home the latest home-made technological wonder: a VCR, and with it (as a gift from the manufacturer) a video camera. With this new equipment at his disposal, he makes movies his entire life. He screens the movies for friends, all of whom desperately want to star in the next one. He gains a reputation in the neighbourhood as "the kid who makes movies". Rather than handing in term papers, he is allowed to hand in "term movies" because, as he himself explains, "[the teachers] knew I'd put more effort into a movie than I ever would into an essay." He starts his own comic strip, "Los Hooligans". His movies win every local film competition and festival. When low academic grades threaten to keep him out of UT Austin's renowned film department, he proves his worth the only way he knows how: he makes a movie. Three, in fact: trilogy of short movies called "Austin Stories" starring his siblings. It beats the entries of the school's top students and allows Robert to enter the programme. After being accepted into the film department, Robert takes $400 of his own money to make his "biggest" film yet: a 16mm short comedy/fantasy called Bedhead.

Pouring every idea and camera trick he knew into the short, it went on to win multiple awards. After meeting and marrying fellow Austin resident Elizabeth Avellan, Robert comes up with a crazy idea: he will sell his body to science in order to finance his first feature-length picture (a Mexican action adventure about a guitarist with no name looking for work but getting caught up in a shoot-'em-up adventure) that he will sell to the Spanish video market and use as an entry point to a lucrative Hollywood career. With his "guinea pig" money he raises a mere $7,000 and creates El Mariachi. But rather than lingering in obscurity, the film finds its way to the Sundance film festival where it becomes an instant favourite, wins Robert a distribution deal with Columbia pictures and turns him into an icon among would-be film-makers the world over. Not one to rest on his laurels, he immediately helms the straight-to-cable movie Roadracers and contributes a segment to the anthology comedy Four Rooms (his will be the most lauded segment).

His first "genuine" studio effort would soon have people referring to him as "John Woo from south-of-the-border". It is the "Mariachi" remake/sequel Desperado. More lavish and action-packed than its own predecessor, the movie--while not a blockbuster hit--does decent business and single-handedly launches the American film careers of Antonio Banderas as the guitarist-turned-gunslinger and Salma Hayek as his love interest (the two would star in several of his movies from then on). It also furthers the director's reputation of working on low budgets to create big results. In the year when movies like Batman Forever and GoldenEye were pushing budgets past the $100 million mark, Rodriguez brought in "Desperado" for just under $7 million. The film also featured a cameo by fellow indie film wunderkind, Quentin Tarantino. It would be the beginning of a long friendship between the two sprinkled with numerous collaborations. Most notable the Tarantino-penned vampire schlock-fest From Dusk Till Dawn. The kitschy flick (about a pair of criminal brothers on the run from the Texas Rangers, only to find themselves in a vamp-infested Mexican bar) became an instant cult favourite and launched the lucrative film career of ER star George Clooney.

After a two-year break from directing (primarily to spend with his family, but also developing story ideas and declining Hollywood offers) he returned to "Dusk till Dawn" territory with the teen/sci-fi/horror movie The Faculty, written by Scream writer, Kevin Williamson. Although it's developed a small following of its own, it would prove to be Robert's least-successful film. Critics and fans alike took issue with the pedestrian script, the off-kilter casting and the flick's blatant over-commercialization (due to a marketing deal with clothing designer Tommy Hilfiger). After another three-year break, Rodriguez returned to make his most successful (and most unexpected) movie yet, based on his own segment from Four Rooms. After a string of bloody, adult-oriented action fare, no one anticipated him to write and direct the colourful and creative Spy Kids, a movie about a pair of prepubescent Latino sibs who discover that their lame parents (Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino) are actually two of the world's greatest secret agents. The film was hit among both audiences and critics alike.

After quitting the Writers' Guild of America and being introduced to digital filmmaking by George Lucas, Robert immediately applied the creative, flexible (and cost-effective) technology to every one of his movies from then on, starting with an immediate sequel to his family friendly hit: Spy Kids 2: Island of Lost Dreams which was THEN immediately followed by the trilogy-capper Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over. The latter would prove to be the most financially-lucrative of the series and employ the long-banished movie gimmick of 3-D with eye-popping results. Later the same year Rodriguez career came full circle when he completed the final entry of the story that made brought him to prominence: "El Mariachi". The last chapter, Once Upon a Time in Mexico, would be his most direct homage to the Sergio Leone westerns he grew up on. With a cast boasting Antonio Banderas (returning as the gunslinging guitarist), Johnny Depp (as a corrupt CIA agent attempting to manipulate him), Salma Hayek, Mickey Rourke, Willem Dafoe and Eva Mendes, the film delivered even more of the Mexican shoot-'em-up spectacle than both of the previous films combined.

Now given his choice of movies to do next, Robert sought out famed comic book writer/artist Frank Miller, a man who had been very vocal of never letting his works be adapted for the screen. Even so, he was wholeheartedly convinced and elated when Rodriguez presented him with a plan to turn Miller's signature work into the film Sin City. A collection of noir-ish tales set in a fictional, crime-ridden slum, the movie boasted the largest cast Rodriguez had worked with to that date. Saying he didn't want to mere "adapt" Miller's comics but "translate" them, Rodriguez' insistence that Miller co-direct the movie lead to Robert's resignation from the Director's Guild of America (and his subsequent dismissal from the film John Carter as a result). Many critics cited that Sin City was created as a pure film noir piece to adapt Miller's comics onto the screen. Co-directing with Frank Miller and 'Quentin Tarantino' (who guest-directed in That Yellow Bastard) allowed Rodriquez to again shock Hollywood with his talent.

In late 2007, Rodriquez again teamed up with his friend Tarantino to create the double-episode film, The Grindhouse featuring Rodriquez's offering of Planet Terror. Planet Terror was a film shot in the specific genre of "hardcore, extreme, sex-fueled, action packed." Rodriguez flirts with his passion to make a showy film exploiting all of his experience to make an extremely entertaining thrill ride. The film is encompassed around Cherry (Rose McGowan), a reluctant go-go dancer who is found wanting when she meets her ex-lover El Wray (played by Freddy Rodríguez) who turns up at a local BBQ grill. They then, after a turn of events, find themselves fending off brain-eating zombies whilst trying to flee to Mexico (here we go off to Mexico again). Apart from directing, Rodriquez also involves himself in camera work, editing and composing music for his movies sound tracks (he composed the Planet Terror main theme). He also shoots a lot of his own action scenes to get a direct idea from his eye as the director into the film. In El Mariachi, Rodriquez spent hours in front of a pay-to-use, computer editing his film. This allowed him to capture the ideal footage exactly as he wanted it. Away from the filming aspect of Hollywood, Rodriguez is an expert chef who cooks gourmet meals for the cast and crew. Rodriquez is also known for his ability to turn a low-budgeted film with a small crew into an example of film mastery. El Mariachi was "the movie made on seven grand" and still managed to rank as one of Rodriguez' best films (receiving a rating of 92% on the Rotten Tomatoes film review site).

Because Rodriquez is involved so deeply in his films, he is able to capture what he wants first time, which saves both time and money. Rodriguez's films share some similar threads and ideas, whilst also having differences. In El Mariachi, he uses a hand-held camera. He made this decision for several reasons. First, he couldn't afford a tripod and secondly, he wanted to make the audience more aware of the action. In the action sequences he is given more mobility with a hand-held camera and also allows for distortion of the unprofessional action sequences (because the cost of all special effects in the film totaled $600). However, in Sin City and Planet Terror, the budget was much greater, and Rodriquez could afford to spend more on special affects (especially since both films were filmed predominately with green screen) and, thus, there was no need to cover for error.

Playing by his own rules or not at all, Robert Rodriguez has redefined what is and is not for a film-maker to do. Shunning Hollywood's ridiculously-high budgets, multi-picture deals and the two most powerful unions for the sake of maintaining creative freedom are decisions that would (and have) cost many directors their careers. Rodriguez has turned these into his strengths, creating some of the most imaginative works the big-screen has ever seen.

Tina Louise

Tina Louise was born Tina Blacker in New York City, the daughter of Sylvia (Horn) and Joseph Blacker, who owned a candy store. Tina was still in her teens when she burst upon the national scene by starring on Broadway in the critically acclaimed box-office success "Li'l Abner", based on the famous comic strip character created by Al Capp. Stellar reviews caught the attention of Hollywood and Tina signed up for her first feature film, God's Little Acre, which was an entry in the Venice Film Festival. It was at this point in her career that she began studying with Lee Strasberg and the Actors Studio in New York because she believed it was "time to develop and deepen my knowledge of the craft . . . Lee Strasberg," says Tina, "had the most dynamic effect on me. He influenced my life as no other man ever has."

After several more films, Tina returned to Broadway to star with Carol Burnett in "Fade in, Fade Out". She continued her work in Hollywood, starring in the CBS sitcom Gilligan's Island as Ginger Grant. Moving among Broadway, television and motion pictures, she next starred in The Happy Ending, directed by Richard Brooks, The Stepford Wives with Katherine Ross and Dog Day, with Lee Marvin and French actress Miou-Miou. Tina was cast as a regular on the first season of Dallas and has profuse credits in made-for-TV films for ABC and NBC, including Friendships, Secrets and Lies, The Day the Women Got Even, Look What's Happened to Rosemary's Baby and the famed ABC movie Nightmare in Badham County.

In 1991 Tina appeared in Johnny Suede, in which she co-starred with Brad Pitt. The film marked the debut of director Tom DiCillo, and won the 1992 Gold Leopard Award for Best Picture at the 44th International Film Festival at Lorcano, Switzerland. Other film and television work followed, including Stephan Elliott Welcome to Woop Woop and Growing Down in Brooklyn, and she guest-starred in the syndicated television series L.A. Heat.

In 2004 she received the coveted TVLand Pop Culture Icon Award in Los Angeles, which was aired nationally. She has made numerous television appearances, from The Rosie O'Donnell Show to Entertainment Tonight and Access Hollywood.

A unique opportunity pursued Tina in 2005 with IGT (International Game Technology) in conjunction with Warner Bros. Consumer Products, when she inked a six-figure deal in exchange for 80 lines of voice-over work for a highly publicized gaming machine, a MegaJackpots product with the chance to win $1 million. The slot machines appeared in casinos from coast-to-coast as well as internationally.

Tina is an active member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and a lifetime member of the Actors Studio. As a literacy and academic advocate, she became a volunteer teacher at Learning Leaders, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing tutoring to New York City school children. It has been her passion to help young students gain not only literary skills, but also confidence, self-determination and proof of their own potential. Besides continuing her volunteer work in literacy, she has written several books. Her first book, a personal memoir on her first eight years entitled "Sunday", was published in 1998. She followed Sunday, with a children's book, "When I Grow Up", published in 2007. "Teaching children the skill of reading and a love for the written word is important because this will remain with them throughout their lives. If we can reach children at an early age, I believe it will make a difference. This thought brings me tremendous joy." Says Tina. She embarked on a book tour that included New York City and then continued to New Jersey, Long Island, Connecticut, Philadelphia and the Festival of Books at UCLA. Her third book, "What Does a Bee Do?" was published in 2009 (available only at Amazon.com) and was inspired by The Colony Collapse Disorder, otherwise known as Honey Bee Depopulation Syndrome. The book continues to be an educational tool for children, as well as adults and was recently approved by Joel Klein, chancellor of New York City Public Schools, and is tentatively awaiting on the E-Catalog for principals in the fall of 2010. An animated version of "What Does a Bee Do?" is in development.

Besides being an accomplished actress and author, she recorded an album, "It's Time for Tina", a sultry warm and breathy collection of standards. The enchanting album features music from saxophone legend Coleman Hawkins and lyrics and music by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin, Jule Styne and Cole Porter. She also made her debut as a visual artist when she exhibited her paintings at the Ambassador Galleries, and later with newer works at the notable Gallery Stendhal in Soho. Most recently she exhibited her original paintings at the Patterson Museum of Art. Tina Louise continues to live in New York City.

Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds was born Mary Frances Reynolds in El Paso, Texas, the second child of Maxine N. (Harmon) and Raymond Francis Reynolds, a carpenter for the Southern Pacific Railroad. Her film career began at MGM after she won a beauty contest at age 16 impersonating Betty Hutton. Reynolds wasn't a dancer until she was selected to be Gene Kelly's partner in Singin' in the Rain. Not yet twenty, she was a quick study. Twelve years later, it seemed like she had been around forever. Most of her early film work was in MGM musicals, as perky, wholesome young women. She continues to use her dancing skills with stage work.

She was only 31 when she gave an Academy Award-nominated performance in The Unsinkable Molly Brown. She survived losing first husband Eddie Fisher to Elizabeth Taylor following the tragic death of Michael Todd. Her second husband, shoe magnate Harry Karl, gambled away his fortune as well as hers. With her children as well as Karl's, she had to keep working and turned to the stage. She had her own casino in Las Vegas with a home for her collection of Hollywood memorabilia until its closure in 1997. She took the time to personally write a long letter that is on display in the Judy Garland museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota and to provide that museum with replicas of Garland's costumes. The originals are in her newly-opened museum in Hollywood.

Nearly all the money she makes is spent toward her goal of creating a Hollywood museum. Her collection numbers more than 3000 costumes and 46,000 square-feet worth of props and equipment.

Her children, with musician/actor Eddie Fisher, are Todd Fisher and actress Carrie Fisher.

Katrina Law

Ever since she was a child growing up in South Jersey, Katrina Law had more energy than she knew what to do with. Her mother (being the brilliant mother that she is) recognized this at an early age and enrolled Katrina in a variety of activities ranging from dance and gym classes to karate lessons, soccer practice and voice coaching. You name the activity and Katrina's mother probably had her try it at least once. When she graduated high school her yearbook was filled with photos of her on the Varsity Track team, Varsity Soccer Team, Varsity Cheerleading Squad and even the Varsity Weightlifting Team. She was also a member of The National Honors Society and won the title of Miss New Jersey Teen USA where she went on to represent the state at finals on national television.

This eccentric collection of interests and activities, combined with her exotic physical appearance usually means that the first question people as her is, "What are you?"

What she is, to answer their question, is a typical small town American Girl. Her parents met during the Vietnam War; her father being a Catholic of German and Italian decent serving in the U.S. armed forces and her mother a Buddhist living in Taiwan, working as a bartender. This combination of cultures learning to live in harmony under one roof taught Katrina tolerance, patience, understanding, and humor as a child and still guides her to this day.

After graduating with a Theater degree from The Richard Stockton College of NJ, Katrina's acting education continued on in the big cities of Philadelphia and New York. There she not only deepened her understanding of acting as an art form, but she also sharpened her teeth on the business of acting. In New York City she earned her S.A.G. eligibility on the set of Numbers with Nora Ephron and John Travolta and finally joined S.A.G. when she booked a Guest Star on NY's "The Third Watch". Since then she has gone on to act in many exciting projects including a three episode arc as the Mord'Sith "Garen" in Legend of the Seeker and as the series regular "Mira" in the hit new show Spartacus: Blood and Sand.

Kate Upton

Katherine Elizabeth Upton was born in St. Joseph, Michigan, to Shelley Fawn (Davis), a state tennis champion from Texas, and Jefferson Matthew Upton, a high school athletics director. Her uncle is Michigan congressman Fred Upton. Upton always knew she wanted to be a model. Since signing with IMG Models in 2010, Kate has taken the world by storm. For the past two years, Kate has graced the cover of the legendary Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue, which has led to an onslaught of media buzz about the 21-year-old. Kate's stardom was elevated to an even higher level with her June 2013 American Vogue cover shot by Mario Testino, whose byline proclaims "American Dream Girl: How Kate Upton Became the Hottest Supermodel on Earth." She has appeared on Jimmy Kimmel, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, The Ellen Show, The Late Show, Saturday Night Live, The Dan Patrick Show, and Le Grand Journal, and continues to be one of the most searched-for names on Google.

Beyond Sports Illustrated, Kate has been featured on the covers of Vogue Italia, British Vogue, CR Fashion Book, Cosmopolitan, French ELLE, GQ, Italian GQ, German GQ, Jalouse, Sunday Times Style, Esquire, The Daily, and Muse Magazine. She has appeared in fashion editorials for American Vogue, Vogue Spain, V Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, and Russian Interview, and has worked with photographers such as Mario Testino, Steven Meisel, Terry Richardson, Alasdair McLellan, Bruce Weber, Sebastian Kim, Guy Aroch, Matt Jones, Miguel Reveriego, Norman Jean Roy, Josh Olins, Gilles Bensimon, Yu Tsai, Sebastian Faena, Walter Iooss, Ellen von Unwerth, and Stewart Shining. A favorite of high-fashion notables such as Stephen Gan, Tonne Goodman, Carlyne Cerf, Carine Roitfeld, and Katie Grand, Kate was also shot for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's "Schiaparelli and Prada: Impossible Conversations" Exhibition Catalogue in 2012. Models.com exclaims, "The sexy market just got a little more competitive thanks to the meteoric rise of Kate Upton. The Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition was a major coup, but the momentum keeps building with cover after cover. We can't remember the last time a newbie made such a splash!"

Kate's YouTube video of her dancing to Cali Swag District's "Teach Me How to Dougie" last year was the number one watched video on Twitter and Google for multiple weeks. She has an enterprising reputation for creating viral hits, and the clip has over 8 million views.

Known for her vivacious personality and incredible physique, Kate has been the face for Sam Edelman, Accessorize, Guess Lingerie, Guess Jeans, Guess Accessories, Liverpool, Dylan George, and Dooney & Burke. She has also worked with Gillette, Skullcandy Headphones and Beach Bunny Swimwear, even designing a Beach Bunny Swimwear collection herself. She has starred in commercials for Mercedes-Benz, Carl's Junior and Sobe, and starred in The Other Woman, by director Nick Cassavetes.

Kate resides in New York City. Kate is a five-time world champion equestrian, and she enjoys hanging out at the barn, horseback riding, and is an avid sportsfan.

Ashley Olsen

Ashley Fuller Olsen (born June 13, 1986) is an American fashion designer, producer, author, businesswoman and former actress. She co-founded luxury fashion brands The Row, Elizabeth and James, and the more affordable lines Olsenboye and StyleMint with her twin sister Mary-Kate Olsen. She is also the older sister of actress Elizabeth Olsen.

Ashley was born in Sherman Oaks, California, the daughter of Jarnette "Jarnie", a personal manager, and David "Dave" Olsen, a real estate developer and mortgage banker. Along with her twin, Mary-Kate, they have an older brother, Trent Olsen, a younger sister, Elizabeth Olsen who is also an actress, and younger half siblings Taylor and Jake from their father's second marriage.[ Olsen's parents divorced in 1996. The twins and their siblings have Norwegian ancestry on their father's side.

Olsen began her career at the age of nine months old, when she and Mary-Kate were hired to share the role of Michelle Tanner on the popular television series Full House in 1987. Following the end of Full House, Olsen released a string of successful straight-to-video movies and became a popular figure in the preteen market during the late 1990s and early 2000s. She became a household name, with her likeness seen in clothes, books, fragrances, magazines, movies, and posters, among others. There were fashion dolls of her made by Mattel from 2000 to 2005. She starred in the video series The Adventures of Mary-Kate & Ashley, the ABC show Two of a Kind, and ABC Family's So Little Time. She and her sister were jointly ranked number three on the VH1 program 100 Greatest Child Stars. In 2004, the twins appeared in the theatrical light-hearted romantic comedy, New York Minute. In 2007, when Mary-Kate and Ashley were 21 they said that if they got involved in movies together again it would be as producers. When asked about acting again in 2009 Ashley said, "Never say never." In 2009 Olsen contemplated returning to acting. She changed her mind and in 2012 the sisters decided to quit acting permanently and focus on fashion. In October 2013, Olsen appeared in the music video for "City of Angels" by Thirty Seconds to Mars.

Nickelodeon acquired the rights to Mary-Kate and Ashley's video library in 2015.

In 2015, it was announced that John Stamos had signed on with Netflix to produce and co-star in Fuller House, a spin-off Full House that would reunite the original cast members. Mary-Kate and Ashley originally announced in May that they would not reprise their role as Michelle Tanner, however in July, according to Netfix's Ted Sarandos, the Olsen twins were "teetering" on an agreement to join the series.

In 2004, both Ashley and Mary-Kate Olsen became co-presidents of their company Dualstar (created in 1993 following the success of Full House), the brand currently selling in over 3,000 stores in America and 5,300 stores worldwide. Their success has been marked on Forbes' The Celebrity 100 list since 2002. In 2007, Forbes ranked the twins as the eleventh-richest women in entertainment, with an estimated combined net worth of $300 million.

Following a high volume of public interest in their fashion choices, both worked in collaboration on a string of fashion lines available to the public. They started a clothing line in Wal-Mart stores across America for girls ages 4 to 14 as well as a beauty line called Mary-Kate and Ashley: Real Fashion for Real Girls.

In 2004, they made news by signing a pledge to allow all the workers that sew their line of clothing in Bangladesh full maternity leave. The National Labor Committee, which organized the pledge, later praised the twins for their commitment to worker rights.

The idea for The Row started as a personal project in 2005 when Ashley Olsen challenged herself to create a perfect T-shirt. She tested the design on a variety of women of all body shapes and ages in an attempt to find a "commonality in fit and attitude."

By 2006, the sisters had created a 7-piece collection that included the T-shirt, a pair of cotton sateen leggings, and a cashmere wool tank dress. Barneys New York bought the entire first collection. The brand has expanded to include ready-to-wear, resort, handbags, sunglasses, and shoes.

In 2006, they were tapped as the faces of the upscale fashion line Badgley Mischka. As adults, the Olsens have devoted much of their attention to the world of fashion. They head a couture fashion label, The Row, as well as the Elizabeth and James, Olsenboye, and StyleMint retail collections. Ashley Olsen has appeared on best-dressed lists. The Olsens designed an Olsenboye Change Purse in 2011 and donated the money to "Pennies From Heaven".

In 2011, the Olsen sisters teamed up with TOMS Shoes to design footwear for kids without shoes in more than 20 countries worldwide. Mary-Kate and Ashley are now the creative directors for the Italian brand Superga. The Olsens released an Elizabeth and James perfume in early 2013. StyleMint is now available in the UK.

In October 2012, Ashley and Mary-Kate won the WSJ magazine Innovator of The Year Award.

Ashley and Mary-Kate won the top prize at the 2012 CFDA Fashion Awards.

Ashley with her twin was nominated for Council Of Fashion Designers in 2015.

In 2008, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen wrote Influence, a book featuring interviews with fashion designers that have inspired the Olsens' fashion lines.

In 2005, Olsen filed a $40 million lawsuit against tabloid magazine National Enquirer for depicting her as being involved in a drug scandal. Her case was dismissed by a federal court in Los Angeles in November of the same year.

In May 2004, Olsen and high school sweetheart Matt Kaplan split up after three years of dating. In May 2008, Olsen began dating fellow actor Justin Bartha. They split up in March 2011 after almost three years of dating.

As of January 2014, Olsen has been dating film director Bennett Miller.

Maddie Ziegler

Since the age of two, Maddie Ziegler has had a passion for performance. Raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Maddie's mother Melissa enrolled her and her younger sister Mackenzie in dance classes at a local studio. A few years later the trio starred in the hit Lifetime reality series 'Dance Moms'. The result of the show's immense popularity led Ziegler to segue into becoming an viral dance sensation, starring in singer-songwriter Sia's music videos for 'Chandelier', 'Elastic Heart', and 'Big Girls Cry', which have collectively amassed more than 1.5 billion views. Maddie has performed these dark contemporary routines on shows such as _Jimmy Kimmel Live_, Saturday Night Live, Ellen: The Ellen DeGeneres Show, and The 57th Annual Grammy Awards. Ziegler has since begun acting on scripted television shows, such as _Pretty Little Liars_ and Austin & Ally. She makes her major motion picture debut in The Book of Henry, opposite Naomi Watts, Jaeden Lieberher, and Jacob Tremblay.

Madison Pettis

Audiences still remember Madison Pettis as the curly haired ballerina daughter of Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson in her first film, Disney's box office smash, "The Game Plan". Now ten years later & 18 years old, Madison has literally grown up in front of America's eyes, while building an extensive list of credits & a fan base on social media of over 10 Million followers. Most recently she plays the recurring role of 'Daria,' as part of a love triangle on ABC Family/FreeForm's hit series, "The Fosters", and reprises her character in the Season 4 premiere. Next up on August 6th, Madison stars alongside Italia Ricci in the movie "Late Bloomer", as a high school student struggling with a mean girl as prom approaches. Madison also continues to voice the feline role of 'Zuri' in Disney's successful animated series "The Lion Guard", with Season 2 premiering later this year. Madison recently served as the NFL's celebrity brand ambassador of their Junior apparel line for the 2015-2016 Season. To celebrate the Super Bowl's 50th Anniversary, she collaborated with the NFL & personally designed a t-shirt for their junior collection, which sold out online in just 5 days. She is also the current brand ambassador for eOne's licensed brand of apparel & accessories line, So So Happy. Previously she was a brand ambassador for Pastry Shoes. Her recent projects include starring in last year's film, Do You Believe, where she took on the challenging role of a pregnant homeless teen runaway. The film also stars Cybill Shepherd, Mira Sorvino, & Sean Astin. Madison also landed a guest appearance in the series finale of NBC'S Parenthood as Max's budding love interest. Madison got her first break in L.A. at age 7 after moving from Texas. Wiithin a few weeks of arriving for her first pilot season, she booked a guest role on the pilot of "Jericho", starring Skeet Ulrich & directed by Jon Turteltaub. That same pilot season, on her very first film audition, she booked a starring role in Disney's football-themed "The Game Plan", as Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson's long-lost daughter, Peyton. The Game Plan scored the #1 spot for two weeks in a row, earning $144 million worldwide. Shortly after, Madison became the youngest Disney Channel star, playing "Sophie" the President's daughter, on "Cory in the House" for 2 seasons. In a crossover episode, Madison guest starred on the hit show, "Hannah Montana" & those producers subsequently offered Madison a starring role in her 2nd TV series--in their new creation, "Life With Boys", which ran for 2 seasons on Teen Nickelodeon & in 86 countries worldwide. Madison has worked with some of the biggest names in the business, including Will Smith in "Seven Pounds". She also starred as Jane Krakowski's daughter alongside Nathan Lane & Uma Thurman in "Muppets Christmas: Letters to Santa", and played Penelope Ann Miller's daughter in the indie "Free Style". Madison also starred in "Mostly Ghostly" 1 & 2, and guest starred on The Hub's "Haunting Hour"--all based on the popular "Goosebumps" book series by author R.L. Stine. She starred in other projects for Disney, including "The Search for Santa Paws" & a recurring character in 10 episodes of the hit Disney XD series "Lab Rats". Madison's resumé also includes substantial animation voiceover work. For nearly 100 episodes she voiced the lead role of "Izzy" in Disney Jr's series "Jake and the Never Land Pirates". Other credits include the voice of George Lopez's puppy daughter in "Beverly Hills Chihuahua" 2 & 3 and a recurring role on Disney Channel's "Phineas & Ferb". Madison has the distinct honor of being the youngest entertainer ever to tour for the USO and traveled to Germany & Hawaii to visit with thousands of children of service men & women at schools on military bases. She has a big brother serving on active duty in the Army, so supporting America's troops & their families is a cause close to her heart. She's also helped raise funds for Trees For Troops, which provides free Christmas trees to military families. Madison just graduated with honors from Notre Dame High School & was accepted to NYU's prestigious Tisch School of the Arts. She has decided to defer her enrollment to focus on her career in Los Angeles. 10+ Million followers on Social Media: 6.0 Million on Facebook (www.Facebook.com/OfficialMadisonPettis) 2.6 Million on Instagram (www.Instagram.com/MadisonPettis) 1.5 Million on Twitter (www.Twitter.com/MadisonPettis)

Allie Marie Evans

The Los Angeles-based actress & filmmaker is already a role model for a new generation of fans. Combining the youthful creativity of Tavi Gevinson with the business smarts of Tyra Banks, today Allie is a star with an impressive social following. Adored for her honest short films, ranging in subject from fashion to the struggles of adolescence. Allie has also been slated to star as Max in the Collectives adaptation of the New York Times Best Seller Maximum Ride written by James Patterson.

Alysia Reiner

Alysia Reiner is an indomitable spirit. She is also an award winning actress, producer, mother, humanitarian and outspoken environmentalist. When Alysia lost her father suddenly to cancer in 2002, she subsequently created "Speed Grieving," an award winning short film about her loss. Then she set out to use that film to help all those in grief and mourning to feel their loss fully, to not have their grief be "rushed" by a youth-centric society afraid to discuss death, and to help heal the world. She has now partnered with The Cancer Support Community to bring "Speed Grieving" to all of their centers and to aid those living with cancer and their loved ones to begin to talk about grief and loss and to open their hearts through art. As a new mother, Alysia was featured on Celebrity Baby Scoop, is a guest scout on Stroller Traffic, is a celebrity spokesperson for Ruby Pinwheels, and was recently asked to be an official spokeswoman for Best For Babes, an organization that works to change how we view and support breast feeding, and gives moms the solutions they need to make it work. Alysia is a champion of all things Eco-friendly, and she and her husband recently used their own home as a way to share information about building green. Their brownstone renovation in Harlem was featured on television's "World's Greenest Homes" and "Renovation Nation"; in various magazines like Dwell, Gotham, and The Nest; and they allowed the environmentally friendly construction process to be chronicled on Web sites such as Dwell.com and Kohler.com. Alysia is on the board of The Broad Collective, and is involved with many charities including The Cancer Support Community, Habitat for Humanity, Our Time Theatre Company, 52nd Street Project, Actors for Autism, Joyful Heart Foundation, Comp2Kids, GEMS, and Circle of Health International.

Amber Marshall

Born and raised in London, Ontario, Amber trained at Lester B. Pearson School for the Arts, as well as The Original Kids Theatre Company in London. Amber has appeared in numerous film and television productions, displaying a remarkable range and vulnerability. She is most known for her work as Amy Fleming on CBC's long running series Heartland, now filming season 9.

Amber was awarded with the 2013 Fan Choice Award at the Canadian Screen awards and has kept an intimate relationship with her fans through communication on her Social Media pages. A strong actress, she has had regular roles in television series such as Super Rupert, The Power Strikers and Dark Oracle, and has guest appeared on different series, including Twice in a Lifetime and Doc. Heartland, a television series filmed in Alberta has been her dream come true. The contemporary family drama follows Marshall's character, Amy as she works with troubled horses and their owners to find harmony.

She has also played the daughter to Rob Lowe in a TV Classic Christmas tale called, "Christmas Shoes." To add to her Christmas TV Movie collection, Amber starred in Heartland's Christmas Movie, titled; "A Heartland Christmas." She also recently added the role of Nicole on a SyFy Channel Movie of the Week called Fallout Asylum to her resume.

A former veterinary assistant who is passionate about all animals, Amber has been around horses as long as she can remember. She has been riding since a very young age and says that the two things she loves the most - acting and horses - have come together to create this dream role of Amy on the Heartland series. Amber loves to be outdoors and enjoys overnight mountain trips with her horses and dogs. As Heartland films in Alberta, she has made a home for herself with her husband on a ranch outside of Calgary where she is surrounded by stunning vistas and of course, her animals.

She has also started her own Magazine (Amber Marshall Life & Style)as well as her own line of jewellery (Amber Marshall Jewellery Collection).

Tom Hollander

Tom Hollander was born the second child of educated parents, both teachers. He grew up in Oxford, (UK).

Hollander credits the happy atmosphere of the Dragon School with his childhood introduction to acting. There, encouraged by an influential teacher named Andrew Roberts, he won the title role in "Oliver". His studies continued at Abingdon, as did his pursuit of acting. At about this point, he won a place in the National Youth Theatre, a UK organization for young people in the field of musical theatre, based in London, and later at the Children's Music Theatre. It was during CMT's "The Leaving of Liverpool" (1981) that he came to the attention of BBC television, and subsequently found himself front and center as the young protagonist in a well-regarded John Diamond, based on the popular Leon Garfield adventure novel. He was just fourteen years old.

Other early projects included two roles in Bertholt Brecht's "The Caucasian Chalk Circle" (1985) for the National Youth Theatre, and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" for Oxford University Dramatic Society.

Hollander attended Cambridge University at about the same time as his childhood friend Sam Mendes in a visually bold (and well-remembered) staging of "Cyrano de Bergerac" (1988). Other collaborations with Mendes have followed, including work at the West End production of "The Cherry Orchard" (1989, with Judi Dench), and the Chichester Festival Theatre (1989) as well as a Toronto staging of "Kean" (1991) with Derek Jacobi. He also appeared in the Cambridge Footlights Revue (1988).

Upon graduation, Hollander hoped to gain entry to drama school, but found himself disappointed. The oversight did nothing to discourage a successful career already well under way: he garnered an Ian Charleson Award for his turn as Witwould in "The Way of the World" (1992), was nominated again for a "splendidly sinister, manic" performance as "Tartuffe" (1996), and yet again as a finalist for his Khlestakov ("a performance of ideal vigour and impudence"), in Gogol's "The Government Inspector" (1997). Inevitably, Hollander was urged to try films, and appeared in two films as early as 1996. True Blue (aka "Miracle at Oxford") found him in a small but memorable role as the cox for Oxford's noted 1987 "mutiny crew" that went on to win the that year's boat race against Cambridge, and in a thankless role in Some Mother's Son, a sober drama about an IRA gunman, playing a Thatcher representative.

Hollander's career has featured a number of memorable gay roles. His fans are especially fond of the larger-than-life Darren from Bedrooms and Hallways, a romantic comedy with what one reviewer called the "funniest bedroom scene of the year" involving Hollander's character and Hugo Weaving. The over-the-top Darren was so convincing that some viewers assumed Hollander was gay. "Sometimes I call myself a professional homosexual impersonator," he told an interviewer at the time, quickly adding, "you could say that ...Sir Ian McKellen and Rock Hudson do straight actors." The following year, he would take on a very different kind of "gay" role, playing the notorious "Bosie" (Lord Alfred Douglas) against Liam Neeson's Oscar Wilde in "The Judas Kiss" (1998).

"Martha -- Meet Frank Daniel and Laurence" (aka The Very Thought of You, with Joseph Fiennes and Rufus Sewell, brought accolades for his standout role as Daniel, a difficult music executive. Variety, impressed, noted him for "U.K. legit work" and called him the "undisputed hit of the pic".

2001 brought Gosford Park, Robert Altman's masterfully stylized murder mystery, in which he played the quietly desperate Anthony Meredith against Michael Gambon's callously indifferent paterfamilias. Hollander's name figures in a half dozen or more "Best Ensemble" awards for this complex, multi-storied film.

Considered the character-actor-of-choice for roles with comedic qualities, Hollander has challenged assumptions about his capacity by taking on difficult, troubled characters such as the tightly-wound King George V in Stephen Poliakoff's The Lost Prince for BBC and the demented fascist dictator Maximillian II in Land of the Blind. Hollander himself is particularly proud of the film Lawless Heart, a slyly humorous, cleverly constructed comedy-drama told from three viewpoints. Hollander's character, the heart of the film, is a decent man, devastated by the death of his partner, and grieving privately as the stories of friends and family unfold around him. A study of desire, loyalty and courage, the film was very well reviewed and much respected.

More recent film work has brought him to the attention of mainstream movie audiences, who now know him as the magnificently petty tyrant Lord Cutler Beckett in the second and third installments of Disney's "Pirates of the Caribbean" movies, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest and Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End. This role brought another kind of achievement: Hollander could now say that he'd been commemorated in collectible action-figure form.

He's worked three times with director Joe Wright, beginning with the prissy, yet strangely likeable Mr. Collins in Pride & Prejudice, as a clueless classical cellist in an unfortunately truncated role in The Soloist, and as Issacs, the German henchman in Hanna.

With In the Loop, Hollander brought a perfectly unbearable, delicate tension to the role of Simon Foster, the earnestly clueless "British Secretary of State for International Development" who says the wrong thing at exactly the wrong moment. The film acted as a kind of companion piece to the critically-acclaimed The Thick of It on BBC2, Armando Iannucci's furious political satire on the machinations of war and media. Hollander's contribution to the expanded story was apparently so well-received he was "brought back" (but in a different role, entirely) from film to television for a series-ending surprise-appearance in series 3, delighting fans of the show.

Recent work in television has brought him the opportunity to expand on his special capacity for conveying nuanced and contradictory characters. He earned an award for Best Actor at the FIPA International Television Festival for his portrayal of Guy Burgess in Cambridge Spies, and earned praise for the monstrously rude yet oddly endearing Leon in the satire Freezing, with Hugh Bonneville and Elizabeth McGovern) for BBC. He was unforgettable in an elegantly brief but very moving portrayal of King George III for HBO's John Adams.

2010 brought Hollander to widespread attention with Rev., which he co-created with James Wood. The show, initially described in what was assumed to be familiar terms ("vicar", "comedy") became something entirely new: "...an exploration of British hypocrisy and a warmly played character piece", wrote Giles Fraser, Canon Chancellor at St Paul's Cathedral in a piece for The Sunday Telegraph. Rev. was much more than it appeared: reviews called it intelligent, realistic and very funny, with a stellar cast headed by Hollander as the sympathetic and very human vicar, Adam Smallbone. The show would garner a BAFTA in 2011 for Best Situation Comedy, among other awards and recognition.

Hollander supports a variety of charitable causes in innovative ways. In 2006 he ran his first race for the Childline Crisis hotline, and in 2007 ran for the Teenage Cancer Trust. He is a long-time supporter of the Helen and Douglas House in Oxford, which provides Hospice care for children, and continues to support charitable organizations by contributing readings and other appearances throughout the year. Hollander is a patron of BIFA, the British Independent Film Awards, and has supported the efforts of the Old Vic's "24 Hour Plays New Voices" Gala, which forwards the cause of young writers for the British stage.

Hollander continues to diversify with voicework roles in radio, reading audiobooks, doing voiceover work and onstage. He appeared in the Old Vic's production of Georges Feydeau's "A Flea in Her Ear" (2010), playing a demanding dual role: the upstanding Victor Emmanuel Chandebise and the lame-brained Poche. Reviews called it "insanity", and his performance "a breathtaking combination of lightning physical precision and shockingly true confusion".

Hollander is in production for series 2 of the winning comedy Rev..

Julian McMahon

Julian Dana William McMahon was born in Sydney, Australia, the second of three children of Lady Sonia McMahon (née Sonia Rachel Hopkins) and Sir Billy McMahon, the longest continuously serving government minister in Australian history, serving over 21 years as a government minister before serving as Prime Minister of Australia from March 1971 to December 1972. Sir Billy died March 31, 1988, age 80, four months before Julian's 20th birthday, and Julian's mother, Lady (Sonia) McMahon, died of cancer, three days after the 22nd anniversary of her husband's passing, in Sydney, on April 2, 2010, age 77, with Julian and his two sisters at her bedside.

Julian is of Irish and English descent. Julian started a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Wollongong, but after more time spent in the University bar than at classes, he became bored after one year and began a career in modeling, working primarily in commercials. In 1987, he began print modeling assignments in Los Angeles, New York, Milan, Rome and Paris. His appearance in a TV commercial promoting jeans in his home country made him popular enough to be cast as the lead in The Power, the Passion, an Australian "Dynasty"-like series. After 18 months on "The Power, The Passion," Julian then joined the cast of Home and Away, another successful Australian series, where he won a best actor award from a national magazine.

McMahon later performed on stage, appearing in a musical version of "Home and Away" in Britain as well as in "Love Letters" in Sydney and Melbourne. After a lead role in the feature film Wet and Wild Summer! with Elliott Gould, he moved to Hollywood so that he could read for more American projects. In 1992, he was cast as Ian Rain on NBC's daytime drama Another World. He left "Another World" after two years, in order to expand his range and experience, appearing in several Los Angeles stage productions. He also appeared in the feature film Magenta before landing the role of Agent John Grant on Profiler for four seasons, .

In his free time, McMahon enjoys surfing, biking, and cooking. He is a fan of baseball, American football and basketball, and he collects classic books.

Katy Townsend

Katy Townsend "The Cheeky Scot" hails from Glasgow where she unearthed her passion in the theatre world. Currently exploring her twenties in Los Angeles, Katy's adventures have lead in to independent cinema, high profile video games, audiobooks and most recently; virtual reality, motion capture and animation.

Most recognized as the voice of fiery-spirited, celtic pit-fighter "Cait" in Bethesda's BAFTA winning blockbuster "Fallout 4", and for her portrayal of truth seeker "Klue" in Google Earth creator, John Hanke's groundbreaking global Augmented Reality Game "Ingress", Katy's voice can currently be heard in 505 Games' award-winning Virtual Reality release, "Adr1ft", available on Oculus Rift and Steam. Further, AudioFile Earphones Award winner Townsend has narrated audiobooks with top publishers; Penguin Random House and Hachette Books.

Townsend's notable on screen credits include playing Catherine Dent's patient, "Jane" in Academy Award Winner, Ronald Judkins' feature film "Finding Neighbors", - and Dean Cain's daughter "Amy" in teen horror flick 'Kill Katie Malone', along with a collection of unusual wee art films that she's exceptionally proud of.

Katy is currently touring the convention circuit for gaming, making guest appearances at Visioncon, Glitchcon and Comic-Con International 2016, to name a few. For more info on these schedules, please keep an eye on Katy's social media pages.

Shelley Duvall

Shelley Alexis Duvall was born in Houston, Texas, to Bobbie Ruth (Massengale) and Robert Richardson Duvall, a lawyer. During her childhood, Shelley's mother humorously gave Shelley the nickname "Manic Mouse", because she would often run around her house and tip over furniture. Shelley however was more than a mouse, but rather quite the little artist. Her favorite thing to do when she was very young was draw. She also has three brothers: Scott, Shane, and Stewart.

Shelley graduated from Waltrip High School in Texas and at first became a cosmetics salesperson. It was in 1970 when Shelley was discovered by talent scouts at a local party. Director Robert Altman wanted to cast Shelley in a film that he was making during the time. Shelley had experience in acting in high school plays at the time and took Altman's offer and she appeared in her first film Brewster McCloud. Altman was so fascinated by her performance that she appeared in his next films including: McCabe and Mrs. Miller in 1971, Thieves Like Us in 1974, and Nashville in 1975. Aside from these three successful films, Duvall's acting blossomed in her leading role as Mille Lammoroux in 3 Women in 1977. Duvall's acting was so superb that she won Best Actress at the 1977 Cannes Film Festival. Shelley also starred as Bernice in Joan Micklin Silver's Bernice Bobs Her Hair in 1976, and had a cameo in Woody Allen's Annie Hall in 1977. In the same year, Shelley also hosted an episode of Saturday Night Live.

When the 1980s hit, Duvall's career was just beginning. She is famously known for playing the role of "Wendy Torrance" in Stanley Kubrick's The Shining with Jack Nicholson. During the making of this film, Kubrick and Duvall would often become very frustrated with each other. The most obvious example is when Kubrick shot the famous "baseball bat scene" with Duvall and Nicholson 127 times, which is the world record for most number of takes in any film set. Despite their differences, Duvall admitted that she learned more from Kubrick than any of her previous films and that she "wouldn't trade the experience for anything." Kubrick also knew that he pushed Shelley and treated her the way he did for a significant reason, as the role of "Wendy Torrance" was even said by Jack Nicholson, "the hardest role anyone has ever had to play."

In January of 1979, Robert Altman would offer Duvall yet another role in one of his films. Only the role was a certain role that Altman believed she was born to play. That certain role was "Olive Oyl" in the real life version of Popeye. Shelley was skeptical at first on accepting the role, due to bad memories as a child of negatively being called "Olive Oyl" in grade school. She fortunately decided to take the role and performed admirably. Shelley also sings several songs in this film. The most famous ones would be "He's Large" and "He Needs Me" which also appeared in the film Punch Drunk Love.

As the 1980s rolled on, Shelley's career never slowed down. She appeared as a supporting actress in Terry Gilliam's Time Bandits in 1981; she played "Susan Frankenstein" in Tim Burton's Frankenweenie , and co-starred in the hit comedy film Roxanne in 1987 starring Steve Martin. From 1982 to 1986, Shelley continued her filming career but from a different aspect. Since Shelley was 17, she had a collection of a variety of illustrated classic fairy tale books. During the making of Popeye, she showed her collection to Robin Williams. One particular fairy tale she showed Robin was "The Frog Prince". Picturing Robin as the real life Frog Prince, Shelley created Platypus Productions, her own production company. Shelley went to Showtime with the idea for airing a television program that was based on fairy tales. She produced Fairy Tale Theater which Showtime aired that was a hit television series that was based on several classic fairy tales. Fairy Tale Theatre was on television from 1982-1987. Each episode was a one-hour series and there were a total of twenty six episodes, all hosted by Shelley Duvall. Shelley also starred in four out of the twenty six episodes. In 1985, Ms. Duvall created Tall Tales and Legends that was aired for three years until it ended in 1988. Similar to Fairy Tale Theatre, Tall Tales and Legends was also a one-hour series hosted, produced, and guest starred by Duvall. Although it only consisted of nine episodes, Shelley was nominated for an Emmy from the series. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Shelley discovered Think Entertainment; another production company which helped Shelley create more programs and movies that were made for television that aired on common cable channels. Shelley produced three more programs from these production companies that aired on Showtime: Nightmare Classics, Shelley Duvall's Bedtime Stories, and Mrs. Piggle Wiggle. Her Bedtime Stories program earned her a 2nd Emmy Nomination. Shelley sold Think Entertainment in 1993 and retired as a producer.

Shelley Duvall's later career found her a number of different roles. She appeared in the family comedy Home Fries in 1998 playing "Mrs. Jackson", Drew Barrymore's character's mother. Other comedic films Shelley appeared in were Suburban Commando in 1991, and Changing Habits in 1997. She also had cameos in several TV series' such as: Frasier, L.A. Law, The Ray Bradbury Theater, Wishbone, and several others. Shelley returned to the horror genre when she played "Martha Stewart" in The 4th Floor in 1999 and played the role of "Mrs. Stein" in Big Monster On Campus in 2000; which consisted of both the comedy and horror genre.

Since 2002, Shelley Duvall has not acted in any films, but lives a quiet and peaceful life in Blanco, Texas. She has lived in Blanco since 1994, after her home in Los Angeles got damaged by an earthquake. For the last couple years, there have been several rumors about Duvall being a "recluse" and not being in touch with reality. However, a recent interview in 2010 was conducted by MondoFilm VideoGuide that had heavy proof that Shelley is as normal and aware of reality as ever. She has also noted in this interview that she takes care of several animals at her home in Texas and writes a lot of poetry, and that returning to acting is always a possibility.

Anushka Sharma

Sharma was born in Bangalore, but her parents are from Uttarakhand. Her father, Col. Ajay Kumar Sharma, is an army officer and her mother Ashima Sharma is a housewife. She has an elder brother named Karnesh, who was a state-level cricketer and is now in the Merchant Navy. She studied in Army School and graduated with specialization in arts from Mount Carmel College, Bangalore. She then moved to Mumbai to further her modeling career.

Sharma says she originally wished to make it big in the modeling world but had no strong aspirations for films. She began her modeling career at the Lakme Fashion Week as a model for Wendell Rodricks's Les Vamps Show and was picked to be Rodricks's finale model at the Spring Summer '07 Collection. Since then she has done campaigns for Silk & Shine, Whisper, Nathella Jewelry and Fiat Palio.

Her first acting role was in Aditya Chopra's Rab Ne Bana Di Jodi opposite Shahrukh Khan. The film was a huge success and her performance was appreciated. Film critic Taran Adarsh said, "Anushka looks the character and surprises you with a confident performance. It's no small achievement to share screen space with an actor of the caliber of SRK and Anushka manages it very well from start to end." Her second film, Badmaash Company, also under Yash Raj Films, was released on May 7, 2010. She was praised for breaking out of the shell of the conservative and homely Taani to play the feisty and independent Bulbul, and her performance was applauded.

She has two other projects on hand. She began shooting for her first venture outside of Yash Raj with Nikhil Advani and Akshay Kumar in Patiala House in December 2009. Patiala House is scheduled to be released on February 11, 2011. She has also started filming for her third Yash Raj Film, Band Baaja Baaraat, directed by Maneesh Sharma and co-starring debutant Ranveer Singh.

Joanna Christie

Joanna's first big break was landing the part of "Jill" in the West End production of Peter Schaffer's controversial play, "Equus", starring opposite Daniel Radcliffe.

Joanna graduated from the prestigious Mountview stage school and immediately landed a lead role in the National Youth Theatre's acclaimed production "Immaculate Conceit".

She was delighted to be part of the collective of actors taking part in the 24 hour plays at The Old Vic. The group are called "Old Vic, New Voices" and were selected by Kevin Spacey because he believed them to be the best new actors around.

She has spent almost a year touring India performing Shakespeare plays in royal palaces and open-air venues to sell-out crowds.

Joanna is a talented musician, playing piano and singing (her brother is a professional Jazz drummer). She is originally from Yorkshire and now lives in Shoreditch, London with friends.

Joanna is interested in Yoga, Travel, Conservation and Extreme Sports.

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