1-50 of 3,032 names.

Priyanka Chopra

Priyanka Chopra was born 18th July 1982 to the family of Capt. Dr. Ashok Chopra and Dr. Madhu Chopra. She had a very varied upbringing. She started her education at La Martinière Girls College in Lucknow as a resident student; a short stay at Maria Goretti College in Bareilly prepared her for further studies in the USA. Having completed tenth grade in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, she decided to become a software engineer or a criminal psychologist.

She enjoys Indian music and dance; flair for writing poetry and short stories; reading, especially biographies; and has worked for a lot of social-welfare programs.

Karl Urban

Originally from Wellington, New Zealand, Karl Urban now lives in Auckland. Born on June 7, 1972, he is the son of a leather-goods manufacturer (who had hoped that Karl would follow in his footsteps). His first acting role was when he was 8 -- he had a line on a television series. However, he did not act again until after high school. He was offered a role in the NZ soap opera Shortland Street as he was preparing to attend Victoria University. After appearing on the series for the 1993-1994 season, he attended the university for one year, then left to pursue his acting career. Over the next few years, he landed several theater roles in the Wellington area. Eventually, he moved to Auckland, where a number of guest roles in NZ television followed. One of his first roles was that of a heroin addict in the drama series Shark in the Park. He was in a movie as well, entitled Once in Chunuck Bay (aka Chunuk Bair). Other television roles followed, including a guest-starring role in the series White Fang. Karl's biggest roles include Éomer in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, as well as Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy in Star Trek, William Cooper in RED and Judge Dredd in Dredd.

Linda Cardellini

Linda Edna Cardellini was born in Redwood City, California, to Lorraine (Hernan) and Wayne David Cardellini, a businessman. She is of Italian (from her paternal grandfather), Irish (from her mother), German, English, and Scottish descent. Linda grew up in the San Francisco Bay area, California, the youngest of four children. She became interested in acting at age ten, when she performed a singing role in a school Christmas play. She continued to do school productions and community theater.

Linda attended Saint Francis High School in Mountain View, California. After graduating, she had to decide whether to go to New York to pursue theater or Los Angeles to pursue film and television. She chose LA. Linda was cast in her first role, on the series Bone Chillers. Her breakthrough part came when she was cast in Freaks and Geeks. She played academic decathlete Lindsay Weir on the celebrated series, which won an Emmy Award in the Category of "Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series".

Cardellini captured the hearts of young girls, boys and teenagers, worldwide, for her portrayal of Velma in Warner Bros.'s Scooby-Doo. She also co-starred in 'Brian Robbins'' Good Burger, Legally Blonde, with Reese Witherspoon, and Tom McLoughlin's The Unsaid with Andy Garcia, as well as in the Adam Sandler-produced comedy, Grandma's Boy.

In 2005, Cardellini starred in the ensemble film, American Gun, for IFC Films, alongside Donald Sutherland, Forest Whitaker and Marcia Gay Harden. "American Gun" was the debut feature of director/co-writer Aric Avelino, which has earned a Best Picture nomination at the Independent Spirit Awards in 2007. In the same year, Cardellini delivered a heartfelt performance as a jilted lover in Ang Lee's highly-acclaimed drama, Brokeback Mountain, which garnered major accolades from critics, including an Academy Award nomination and Golden Globe win for Best Picture and Outstanding Ensemble in a Motion Picture Drama by the Screen Actor's Guild.

It was upon working with Larry McMurtry and Diana Ossana on this film, that they later cast her in CBS's Hallmark Hall of Fame mini-series Comanche Moon, a testament to their trust in Cardellini's talent and presence on screen. Cardellini starred alongside Val Kilmer and Steve Zahn in the six-hour, epic mini-series in 2008, written by McMurtry (based on McMurtry's novel of the same name), directed by Simon Wincer and executive-produced by Ossana. This western, which was the prequel to "Lonesome Dove," (the television series created in 1989 by McMurtry) aired on three consecutive evenings for two hours each night.

In 2008, Cardellini portrayed the lead role of 'Julie Ingram' in the feature film "The Lazarus Project" starring alongside 'Paul Walker'. Directed by John Glenn, this thriller tells the story of a former criminal who is drawn into an illicit endeavor and subsequently finds himself living an inexplicable new life working at a psychiatric facility.

In 2011, Cardellini co-starred in Jonathan Hensleigh's independent feature film "Kill the Irishman," alongside Christopher Walken, Ray Stevenson and Val Kilmer. The film was based on the true story of Danny Greene, a tough Irish thug working for mobsters in Cleveland during the 1970s. In February 2012, Cardellini starred as 'Kelli' in the independent film "Return," opposite Michael Shannon and John Slattery which earned Cardellini an Independent Spirit Award nomination for "Best Female Lead." "Return" was featured in the Director's Fortnight section at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival and was an official entry at The Deauville, London and Palm Springs International Film Festivals. "Return" follows 'Kelli' as she returns home from war and learns how to adjust to a slower, normal life.

In 2013, Cardellini was almost unrecognizable, but turned heads, for her provocative portrayal of 'Sylvia Rosen,' 'Don Draper's' married mistress, in a guest arc in the sixth season of the critically acclaimed AMC series, "Mad Men." She received her first Emmy nomination for "Outstanding Guest Actress in A Drama Series" for her portrayal.

Working in both film and television, Linda is well-known for her portrayal of 'Nurse Samantha Taggart' on NBC's highly-rated, critically acclaimed series, "ER". She will next be seen as 'Meg Rayburn' in Netflix's new untitled family drama series created by Glenn Kessler, Daniel Zelman and Todd Kessler. Cardellini also has a co-starring role in the indie comedy Welcome to Me, opposite an all-star cast that includes Kristen Wiig, Tim Robbins, Joan Cusack, James Marsden and Wes Bentley. The film is directed by Shira Piven. "Welcome to Me" was produced by Will Ferrell and Adam McKay and premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival.

On the small screen, Cardellini was a guest star, playing 'Dr. Megan Tillman', in CBS' Person of Interest. The crime drama show was created by Jonathan Nolan and stars Jim Caviezel, Taraji P. Henson and Michael Emerson. Cardellini also lends her voice to a diverse group of animated series including Nickelodeon's "Sanjay & Craig" wherein she plays 'Megan,' IFC's "Out There" wherein she voices 'Starla,' and Disney's "Gravity Falls," in which she is 'Wendy.' Cardellini's past voiceover work includes the role of 'Bliss,' the family daughter in the ABC animated television program, The Goode Family.

Linda has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theatre from Loyola Marymount University, and completed a summer study program at the National Theatre in London. She resides in Los Angeles.

Will Smith

Willard Carroll "Will" Smith, Jr. (born September 25, 1968) is an American actor, comedian, producer, rapper, and songwriter. He has enjoyed success in television, film, and music. In April 2007, Newsweek called him "the most powerful actor in Hollywood". Smith has been nominated for five Golden Globe Awards, two Academy Awards, and has won four Grammy Awards.

In the late 1980s, Smith achieved modest fame as a rapper under the name The Fresh Prince. In 1990, his popularity increased dramatically when he starred in the popular television series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. The show ran for six seasons (1990-96) on NBC and has been syndicated consistently on various networks since then. After the series ended, Smith moved from television to film, and ultimately starred in numerous blockbuster films. He is the only actor to have eight consecutive films gross over $100 million in the domestic box office, eleven consecutive films gross over $150 million internationally, and eight consecutive films in which he starred open at the number one spot in the domestic box office tally.

Smith is ranked as the most bankable star worldwide by Forbes. As of 2014, 17 of the 21 films in which he has had leading roles have accumulated worldwide gross earnings of over $100 million each, five taking in over $500 million each in global box office receipts. As of 2014, his films have grossed $6.6 billion at the global box office. He has received Best Actor Oscar nominations for Ali and The Pursuit of Happyness.

Smith was born in West Philadelphia, the son of Caroline (Bright), a Philadelphia school board administrator, and Willard Carroll Smith, Sr., a refrigeration engineer. He grew up in West Philadelphia's Wynnefield neighborhood, and was raised Baptist. He has three siblings, sister Pamela, who is four years older, and twins Harry and Ellen, who are three years younger. Smith attended Our Lady of Lourdes, a private Catholic elementary school in Philadelphia. His parents separated when he was 13, but did not actually divorce until around 2000.

Smith attended Overbrook High School. Though widely reported, it is untrue that Smith turned down a scholarship to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); he never applied to college because he "wanted to rap." Smith says he was admitted to a "pre-engineering [summer] program" at MIT for high school students, but he did not attend. According to Smith, "My mother, who worked for the School Board of Philadelphia, had a friend who was the admissions officer at MIT. I had pretty high SAT scores and they needed black kids, so I probably could have gotten in. But I had no intention of going to college."

Smith started as the MC of the hip-hop duo DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, with his childhood friend Jeffrey "DJ Jazzy Jeff" Townes as producer, as well as Ready Rock C (Clarence Holmes) as the human beat box. The trio was known for performing humorous, radio-friendly songs, most notably "Parents Just Don't Understand" and "Summertime". They gained critical acclaim and won the first Grammy awarded in the Rap category (1988).

Smith spent money freely around 1988 and 1989 and underpaid his income taxes. The Internal Revenue Service eventually assessed a $2.8 million tax debt against Smith, took many of his possessions, and garnished his income. Smith was nearly bankrupt in 1990, when the NBC television network signed him to a contract and built a sitcom, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, around him.

The show was successful and began his acting career. Smith set for himself the goal of becoming "the biggest movie star in the world", studying box office successes' common characteristics.

Smith's first major roles were in the drama Six Degrees of Separation (1993) and the action film Bad Boys (1995) in which he starred opposite Martin Lawrence.

In 1996, Smith starred as part of an ensemble cast in Roland Emmerich's Independence Day. The film was a massive blockbuster, becoming the second highest grossing film in history at the time and establishing Smith as a prime box office draw. He later struck gold again in the summer of 1997 alongside Tommy Lee Jones in the summer hit Men in Black playing Agent J. In 1998, Smith starred with Gene Hackman in Enemy of the State.

He turned down the role of Neo in The Matrix in favor of Wild Wild West (1999). Despite the disappointment of Wild Wild West, Smith has said that he harbors no regrets about his decision, asserting that Keanu Reeves's performance as Neo was superior to what Smith himself would have achieved, although in interviews subsequent to the release of Wild Wild West he stated that he "made a mistake on Wild Wild West. That could have been better."

In 2005, Smith was entered into the Guinness Book of World Records for attending three premieres in a 24-hour time span.

He has planned to star in a feature film remake of the television series It Takes a Thief.

On December 10, 2007, Smith was honored at Grauman's Chinese Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard. Smith left an imprint of his hands and feet outside the world-renowned theater in front of many fans. Later that month, Smith starred in the film I Am Legend, released December 14, 2007. Despite marginally positive reviews, its opening was the largest ever for a film released in the United States during December. Smith himself has said that he considers the film to be "aggressively unique". A reviewer said that the film's commercial success "cemented [Smith's] standing as the number one box office draw in Hollywood." On December 1, 2008, TV Guide reported that Smith was selected as one of America's top ten most fascinating people of 2008 for a Barbara Walters ABC special that aired on December 4, 2008.

In 2008 Smith was reported to be developing a film entitled The Last Pharaoh, in which he would be starring as Taharqa. It was in 2008 that Smith starred in the superhero movie Hancock.

Men in Black III opened on May 25, 2012 with Smith again reprising his role as Agent J. This was his first major starring role in four years.

On August 19, 2011, it was announced that Smith had returned to the studio with producer La Mar Edwards to work on his fifth studio album. Edwards has worked with artists such as T.I., Chris Brown, and Game. Smith's most recent studio album, Lost and Found, was released in 2005.

Smith and his son Jaden played father and son in two productions: the 2006 biographical drama The Pursuit of Happyness, and the science fiction film After Earth, which was released on May 31, 2013.

Smith starred opposite Margot Robbie in the romance drama Focus. He played Nicky Spurgeon, a veteran con artist who takes a young, attractive woman under his wing. Focus was released on February 27, 2015. Smith was set to star in the Sci-Fic thriller Brilliance, an adaptation of Marcus Sakey's novel of the same name scripted by Jurassic Park writer David Koepp. But he left the project.

Smith played Dr. Bennet Omalu of the Brain Injury Research Institute in the sports-drama Concussion, who became the first person to discover chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a football player's brain. CTE is a degenerative disease caused by severe trauma to the head that can be discovered only after death. Smith's involvement is mostly due to his last-minute exit from the Sci-Fi thriller-drama Brilliance. Concussion was directed by Peter Landesman and-bead filmed in Pittsburgh, according to the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. It received $14.4 million in film tax credits from Pennsylvania. Principal photography started on October 27, 2014. Actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw played his wife. Omalu served as a consultant.

As of November 2015, Smith is set to star in the independent drama Collateral Beauty, which will be directed by David Frankel. Smith will play a New York advertising executive who succumbs to an deep depression after a personal tragedy.

Nobel Peace Prize Concert December 11, 2009, in Oslo, Norway: Smith with wife Jada and children Jaden and Willow Smith married Sheree Zampino in 1992. They had one son, Trey Smith, born on November 11, 1992, and divorced in 1995. Trey appeared in his father's music video for the 1998 single "Just the Two of Us". He also acted in two episodes of the sitcom All of Us, and has appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show and on the David Blaine: Real or Magic TV special.

Smith married actress Jada Koren Pinkett in 1997. Together they have two children: Jaden Christopher Syre Smith (born 1998), his co-star in The Pursuit of Happyness and After Earth, and Willow Camille Reign Smith (born 2000), who appeared as his daughter in I Am Legend. Smith and his brother Harry own Treyball Development Inc., a Beverly Hills-based company named after Trey. Smith and his family reside in Los Angeles, California.

Smith was consistently listed in Fortune Magazine's "Richest 40" list of the forty wealthiest Americans under the age of 40.

Cillian Murphy

Striking Irish actor Cillian Murphy was born in Douglas, the oldest child of Brendan Murphy, who works for the Irish Department of Education, and a mother who is a teacher of French. He has three younger siblings. Murphy was educated at Presentation Brothers College, Cork. He went on to study law at University College Cork, but dropped out after about a year. During this time Murphy also pursued an interest in music, playing guitar in various bands. Upon leaving University, Murphy joined the Corcadorca Theater Company in Cork, and played the lead role in "Disco Pigs", amongst other plays.

Various film roles followed, including a film adaptation of Disco Pigs. However, his big film break came when he was cast in Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later..., which became a surprise international hit. This performance earned him nominations for Best Newcomer at the Empire Awards and Breakthrough Male Performance at the MTV Movie Awards.

Murphy went on to supporting roles in high-profile films such as Cold Mountain and Girl with a Pearl Earring, and then was cast in two villain roles: Dr. Jonathan Crane, aka The Scarecrow, in Batman Begins and Jackson Rippner in Red Eye. Although slight in nature for a villain, Murphy's piercing blue eyes helped to create creepy performances and critics began to take notice. Manhola Dargis of the New York Times cited Murphy as a "picture-perfect villain", while David Denby of The New Yorker noted he was both "seductive" and "sinister".

Later that year, Murphy starred as Patrick "Kitten" Braden, an Irish transgender in search of her mother, in Neil Jordan's Breakfast on Pluto, a film adaptation of the Pat McCabe novel. Although the film was not a box office success, Murphy was nominated for a Golden Globes for Best Actor in a Comedy or Musical and he won Best Actor for the Irish Film and Television Academy Awards.

The following year, Murphy starred in Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes the Barley. The film was the most successful independent Irish film and won the Palm D'Or at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival. Murphy continued to take roles in a number of independent films, and also reprised his role as the Scarecrow in Christopher Nolan's The Dark Knight. Nolan is known for working with actors in multiple films, and cast Murphy in Inception, as Robert Fischer, the young heir of the multi-billion dollar empire, who was the target of DiCaprio's dream team.

Murphy continues to appear in high profile films such as In Time, Red Lights, and The Dark Knight Rises, the final film in Nolan's Batman trilogy.

Murphy is married to Yvonne McGuinness, an artist. The couple has two sons, Malachy and Carrick.

Denzel Washington

Denzel Hayes Washington, Jr. was born on December 28, 1954 in Mount Vernon, New York. He is the middle of three children of a beautician mother, Lennis (Lowe), from Georgia, and a Pentecostal minister father, Denzel Washington, Sr., from Virginia. After graduating from high school, Denzel enrolled at Fordham University, intent on a career in journalism. However, he caught the acting bug while appearing in student drama productions and, upon graduation, he moved to San Francisco and enrolled at the American Conservatory Theater. He left A.C.T. after only one year to seek work as an actor. His first paid acting role was in a summer stock theater stage production in St. Mary's City, Maryland. The play was "Wings of the Morning", which is about the founding of the colony of Maryland (now the state of Maryland) and the early days of the Maryland colonial assembly (a legislative body). He played the part of a real historical character, Mathias Da Sousa, although much of the dialogue was created. Afterwards he began to pursue screen roles in earnest. With his acting versatility and powerful sexual presence, he had no difficulty finding work in numerous television productions. He made his first big screen appearance in Carbon Copy with George Segal. Through the 1980s, he worked in both movies and television and was chosen for the plum role of Dr. Philip Chandler in NBC's hit medical series St. Elsewhere, a role that he would play for six years. In 1989, his film career began to take precedence when he won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of Tripp, the runaway slave in Edward Zwick's powerful historical masterpiece Glory.

Through the 1990s, Denzel co-starred in such big budget productions as The Pelican Brief, Philadelphia, Crimson Tide, The Preacher's Wife and Courage Under Fire, a role for which he was paid $10 million. His work in critically-acclaimed films continued simultaneously, with roles in Malcolm X and The Hurricane garnering him Oscar nominations for Best Actor, before he finally won that statuette in 2002 for his lead role in Training Day. He continued to define his onscreen persona as the tough, no-nonsense hero through the 2000s in films like Inside Man, The Book of Eli, The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 and Safe House. Cerebral and meticulous in his film work, he made his debut as a director with Antwone Fisher; he also directed The Great Debaters. During this time period, he also took on the role of producer for some of his films, including The Book of Eli and Safe House.

He lives in Los Angeles, California with his wife, Pauletta Washington, and their four children.

Chris Evans

Christopher Robert Evans began his acting career in typical fashion: performing in school productions and community theater.

He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Lisa (Capuano), who worked at the Concord Youth Theater, and G. Robert Evans III, a dentist. His uncle is congressman Mike Capuano. Chris's father is of half German and half Welsh/English/Scottish ancestry, while Chris's mother is of half Italian and half Irish descent. He has an older sister, Carly Evans, and two younger siblings, a brother named Scott Evans, and a sister named Shana Evans. The family moved to suburban Sudbury when he was 11 years-old. Bitten by the acting bug in the first grade because his older sister, Carly, started performing, Evans followed suit and began appearing in school plays. While at Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School, his drama teacher cited his performance as "Leontes" in "The Winter's Tale" as exemplary of his skill. After more plays and regional theater, he moved to New York and attended the Lee Strasberg Theater Institute.

On the advice of friends, he landed an internship at a casting office and befriended a couple of the agents he regularly communicated with - one of whom later took him on as a client. The screen - not the stage - then became his focus; Evans soon began auditioning for feature films and series television. Evans made one of his first appearances on The Fugitive (CBS, 2000-2001), a remake of the 1960s series and feature film starring Harrison Ford. In the episode "Guilt", Evans played the son of a small-town sheriff who tries to exact revenge after Dr. Kimble - incognito as a liquor store owner - refuses to sell him and his friends alcohol. After small roles in Cherry Falls and The Newcomers - two unknown low-budget features - Evans appeared in Boston Public (Fox, 2000-2004) as a murder suspect. He then appeared in his first major feature, Not Another Teen Movie, a spoof on teen comedies wherein he played a jock who makes a bet that he can turn an unpopular and unkempt girl (Chyler Leigh) into prom queen.

After filming a couple of television pilots he was confident would be successful - Just Married and Eastwick - he appeared in another listless teen comedy, The Perfect Score, playing an average, ho-hum student who takes part in a plot to steal the SAT test. Hijinks naturally ensue. Then, Evans broke through to the Big Time, grabbing the lead in the kidnapping thriller, Cellular, a suspenseful B movie with a cheesy gimmick - a random wrong number on his cell phone forces him into a high-stakes race to save an unknown woman's life. Despite an unassuming performance from Evans and Kim Basinger as the damsel in distress, Cellular failed to break any box office records or please a wide majority of critics. Evans then prepared himself for super stardom when he signed on to play "Johnny Storm" (a.k.a. The Human Torch)in Fantastic Four, 20th Century Fox's long-awaited adaptation of the Marvel comic. Although the film was wildly uneven and disappointing, Evans nearly stole the show with his energetic, unfettered performance. In that year itself, Chris was noticed by critics and made it into magazine and Internet countdowns, scoring himself a third position of the hot body countdown from Gay.com and #18 on E! Television's 2006 101 Sexiest Celebrity Bodies.

The year 2007 also proved to be one successful year for Chris, as he had two movies released around the world that same year, starting with the second installment of the Marvel franchise Fantastic Four. Chris received positive reviews for his performance. The Nanny Diaries, where Evans played "Harvard Hottie", showed his sensitive. The year 2008 saw Chris Evans part of the movie Street Kings, playing the character "Detective Paul Diskant". Street Kings is a movie about police officers trying to cover up their wrongdoings and audiences got to see a serious side of Chris. In the same year, Chris also worked on the movie The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond.

Bryan Cranston

Bryan Lee Cranston is an American actor, voice actor, writer and director. He is perhaps best-known for his roles as "Walter White" on the AMC drama series, Breaking Bad, for which he has won four consecutive Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Emmy Awards, and as "Hal", the father on the Fox situation comedy, Malcolm in the Middle. Other notable roles include "Dr. Tim Whatley" on Seinfeld, Doug Heffernan's neighbor on The King of Queens, astronaut Buzz Aldrin in From the Earth to the Moon, and Ted Mosby's boss on How I Met Your Mother.

Bryan was born in Canoga Park, California, to Audrey Peggy Sell, a radio actress, and Joe Cranston (Joseph Louis Cranston), who was also an actor (and a boxer). His maternal grandparents were German, and his father was of Irish, Austrian-Jewish, and German descent.

Olivia Wilde

Actress and activist Olivia Wilde is a modern-day renaissance woman. Starring in films and popular television shows, Wilde shares the screen with renowned actors while simultaneously giving back to the community.

Olivia Wilde was born Olivia Jane Cockburn in New York City, to journalists Leslie Cockburn (née Leslie Corkill Redlich) and Andrew Cockburn. Her father is from an upper-class British family and her mother is American-born; her recent ancestry includes English, Scottish, German, Irish, and Manx. Olivia was raised in Washington, D.C., and went to school there, as well as at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, from which she graduated in 2002. Her father was born in England and later became an Irish citizen, giving Olivia dual American and Irish nationality, and facilitating her brief study at the Gaiety School of Acting in Dublin, Ireland. After appearing in the short-lived Fox television series Skin, she made her Hollywood debut in The Girl Next Door and then came to public notice in The O.C., but it was as Dr. Remy "Thirteen" Hadley in House M.D. that she achieved international stardom. She has since starred or co-starred in the films TRON: Legacy, Cowboys & Aliens, In Time, People Like Us and The Words.

Wilde's 2010s film credits include the star-studded Third Person, the Oscar-winning drama Her and critically-acclaimed and Golden Globe-nominated Rush. Wilde also produced and starred in the indie comedy Drinking Buddies.

In 2013, Wilde launched the philanthropic company Conscious Commerce, with the mission to create a guide for conscious living by promoting the causes, brands, people and lifestyles that are forging a new paragon of living. In line with the Conscious Commerce mission, Wilde also recently signed on to be the face of H&M's latest Conscious Exclusive Collection, which is made completely using organic and recycled materials. She is also a board member of Artists For Peace and Justice and sits on the foundation board of the ACLU of Southern California.

In 2015, Wilde produced and starred in the drama Meadowland, which premiered at the year's Tribeca Film Festival. Wilde earned rave reviews for her emotionally charged performance as a mother coping with the heartbreak following her young son's disappearance. Up next for Wilde is the holiday comedy Love The Coopers. The film, which features an ensemble cast, follows the exasperated members of an extended family who gather for their annual holiday celebration.

Returning to television next year, Wilde will star alongside Bobby Canavale in HBO's Untitled Rock 'N' Roll drama. Set in 1970s New York, the series is being produced by Martin Scorsese, Mick Jagger and Terence Winter. Wilde previously starred in FOX's acclaimed medical drama "House," playing the standout Dr. Thirteen for six seasons.

Harrison Ford

Harrison Ford was born on July 13, 1942 in Chicago, Illinois, to Dorothy (Nidelman), a radio actress, and Christopher Ford (born John William Ford), an actor turned advertising executive. His father was of Irish and German ancestry, while his maternal grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Minsk, Belarus. Harrison was a lackluster student at Maine Township High School East in Park Ridge Illinois (no athletic star, never above a C average). After dropping out of Ripon College in Wisconsin, where he did some acting and later summer stock, he signed a Hollywood contract with Columbia and later Universal. His roles in movies and television (Ironside, The Virginian) remained secondary and, discouraged, he turned to a career in professional carpentry. He came back big four years later, however, as Bob Falfa in American Graffiti. Four years after that, he hit colossal with the role of Han Solo in Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope. Another four years and Ford was Indiana Jones in Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Four years later and he received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations for his role as John Book in Witness. All he managed four years after that was his third starring success as Indiana Jones; in fact, many of his earlier successful roles led to sequels as did his more recent portrayal of Jack Ryan in Patriot Games. Another Golden Globe nomination came his way for the part of Dr. Richard Kimble in The Fugitive. He is clearly a well-established Hollywood superstar. He also maintains an 800-acre ranch in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Ford is a private pilot of both fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters, and owns an 800-acre (3.2 km2) ranch in Jackson, Wyoming, approximately half of which he has donated as a nature reserve. On several occasions, Ford has personally provided emergency helicopter services at the request of local authorities, in one instance rescuing a hiker overcome by dehydration. Ford began flight training in the 1960s at Wild Rose Idlewild Airport in Wild Rose, Wisconsin, flying in a Piper PA-22 Tri-Pacer, but at $15 an hour, he could not afford to continue the training. In the mid-1990s, he bought a used Gulfstream II and asked one of his pilots, Terry Bender, to give him flying lessons. They started flying a Cessna 182 out of Jackson, Wyoming, later switching to Teterboro, New Jersey, flying a Cessna 206, the aircraft he soloed in. Ford is an honorary board member of the humanitarian aviation organization Wings of Hope.

On March 5, 2015, Ford's plane, believed to be a Ryan PT-22 Recruit, made an emergency landing on the Penmar Golf Course in Venice, California. Ford had radioed in to report that the plane had suffered engine failure. He was taken to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, where he was reported to be in fair to moderate condition. Ford suffered a broken pelvis and broken ankle during the accident, as well as other injuries.

Elizabeth Banks

Elizabeth Banks was born Elizabeth Mitchell in Pittsfield, a small city in the Berkshires in western Massachusetts near the New York border, on February 10, 1974. She is the daughter of Ann (Wallace), who worked in a bank, and Mark P. Mitchell, a factory worker. Elizabeth describes herself as having been seen as a "goody two-shoes" in her youth who was nominated for the local Harvest Queen.

Banks left home to attend college at the University of Pennsylvania--from which she graduated Magna cum Laude--and went on to attend the Advanced Training Program at the prestigious American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, graduating in 1996. She then moved to New York and worked in the theater, and began getting small roles in films and on television. Seeking more screen work, she moved to Los Angeles and was soon cast in supporting roles. She also had to change her last name, to Banks, in order to avoid confusion with actress Elizabeth Mitchell.

Her breakthrough role was as Betty Brant, the secretary of the cantankerous newspaper tycoon in Sam Raimi's Spider-Man. She followed up this performance with small roles in other movies: Swept Away, Steven Spielberg's Catch Me If You Can, Seabiscuit and The 40-Year-Old Virgin. In 2003 she won the Exciting New Face Award at the Young Hollywood Awards.

The winsome, beautiful Banks projected an exceptionally charming screen presence that drew comparisons to Audrey Hepburn, and Hollywood eventually began to take notice, Banks being cast in the lead in such films as Kevin Smith's Zack and Miri Make a Porno and in Oliver Stone's biopic of George W. Bush, W., as Laura Bush.

In television Banks was a recurring guest star on Scrubs as Dr. Kim Briggs, the love interest of Zach Braff's J.D. In 2010 she was cast as Alec Baldwin's love interest in season four of 30 Rock. Originally scheduled to appear in only four episodes, she was brought back as a recurring character for two more seasons, and earned Emmy nominations for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series for two consecutive years.

Banks has more recently appeared in such films as Our Idiot Brother, Man on a Ledge, What to Expect When You're Expecting, People Like Us, and Pitch Perfect. She also won the coveted role as Effie Trinket in The Hunger Games and The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

Banks married Max Handelman, a sports writer and producer, in 2003. They have two sons, Felix, who was born in March 2011, and Magnus, born in Nov. 2012, both by gestational surrogacy.

Tatiana Maslany

Tatiana Gabrielle Maslany was born September 22, 1985 in Regina, Saskatchewan, to Renate, a translator, and Dan, a woodworker. She graduated from Dr. Martin LeBoldus High school in 2003. She was a well respected student, and participated as often as possible in school productions. She is well known for her participation in the Canadian Improv Games. Maslany starred in the 2006 television movie, Booky Makes Her Mark along with Megan Follows and Stuart Hughes.

She had supporting roles in the films Eastern Promises and The Vow, and came to fame starring in the series Orphan Black, playing a large number of clones. Maslany also had a large role in the 2015 film Woman in Gold, playing a young version of Maria Altmann, Helen Mirren's character.

Rhona Mitra

Mitra was born in Paddington, London, England, the daughter of Nora Downey and Anthony Mitra, a cosmetic surgeon. She has an older and a younger brother. Her father is of Bengali Indian and English descent, and her mother is Irish. In 1984, when Mitra was eight, her parents divorced, and she was sent to boarding school. She spent several years at two different schools, including Roedean, but Mitra claims she was eventually expelled from both of them.

Mitra's first main role came as Scott Wolf's illicit love interest on Party of Five. In 2000, Mitra had a small, key role in the film Hollow Man, as the rape victim of Kevin Bacon, an incident that drives his character insane. She had a main role in the medical drama Gideon's Crossing, as "Dr. Alejandra Ollie Klein". Mitra then had roles in Ali G Indahouse; Sweet Home Alabama; Stuck on You, and leading roles in Highwaymen and Spartacus. Mitra appeared in the final season of The Practice as "Tara Wilson", and continued that role into its spin-off Boston Legal, but left not long into the second season. In 2005, Mitra played the role of "Kit McGraw" during Season 3 of Nip/Tuck. Mitra then went on to appear in Skinwalkers, The Number 23 and Shooter. In 2008, Mitra starred in the lead role of the science fiction/action film Doomsday as "Major Eden Sinclair", and, in 2009, went on to star in Underworld: Rise of the Lycans as "Sonja", the daughter of the powerful vampire elder, "Viktor" (played by Bill Nighy).

Mitra appeared as the live action model for "Lara Croft", the lead character in Eidos Interactive's Tomb Raider video game series. She was ranked #46 on the Maxim Hot 100 Women of 2001.

Jennifer Morrison

Jennifer Marie Morrison was born in Chicago, Illinois, the oldest child of teachers David and Judy Morrison. She was raised in Arlington Heights, IL, with a younger sister and brother. She attended the same school her parents taught at, Prospect High School. As a child, she did some work as a model. After graduating from high school, she attended Loyola University in Chicago, where she studied Theater and English. She then moved on to study at the Steppenwolf Theater Company, before relocating to Los Angeles, California to pursue her acting career. Morrison's movie debut came in 1994, playing the daughter of Richard Gere and Sharon Stone in Intersection. Success followed with various film and television roles, including the lead in Urban Legends: Final Cut. She came to wide scale public attention in 2004 for her role as Dr. Allison Cameron in the television series House M.D., for which she was nominated for a prestigious Screen Actors Guild Award. Since leaving "House M.D.", her career has continued to progress with roles in Star Trek, How I Met Your Mother and Warrior.

Reese Witherspoon

Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon was born on March 22, 1976 at Southern Baptist Hospital (now Memorial Medical Center) in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is the second child of Mary Elizabeth "Betty" (Reese) and Dr. John Draper Witherspoon, Sr. Her father was a military surgeon specializing in ear, nose and throat. Her mother was a Registered Nurse who later became a Ph.D in pediatric nursing. Reese spent the first four years of her life in Wiesbaden, Germany, where her father served as a lieutenant colonel in the US Army reserves. Shortly after, John moved the family back to the States, settling in Nashville, Tennessee.

Reese was introduced to the entertainment industry at a very early age. At age 7, she began modeling. This led to appearances on several local television commercials. At age 11, she placed first in a Ten-State Talent Fair.

In 1990, she landed her first major acting role in Robert Mulligan's The Man in the Moon. Her role as a 14-year old tomboy earned her rave reviews. Roles in bigger films such as Jack the Bear and A Far Off Place followed shortly after.

Following high school graduation in 1994 from Harpeth Hall, a Nashville all girls school, Reese decided to put her acting career on hold and attend Stanford University where she would major in English literature. However, her collegiate plans were shortly dashed when she accepted roles to star in two major motion pictures: Fear alongside Mark Wahlberg and Freeway with Kiefer Sutherland. Although neither film was a huge box-office success, they did help to establish Reese as a rising starlet in Hollywood and open the door for bigger and better film roles. Those bigger roles came in movies such as Pleasantville, Election and Cruel Intentions.

Her breakthrough role came as Elle Woods in the 2001 comedy Legally Blonde. The movie was huge box-office smash and established Reese as one of the top female draws in Hollywood. The next year, she scored a follow-up hit with Sweet Home Alabama which went on to gross over $100 million dollars at the box office. In 2006, she took home the best actress Oscar for her role as June Carter Cash in the Johnny Cash biopic Walk the Line. In the late 2000s and early 2010s, Reese continued to star in more romantic comedies such as Four Christmases and How Do You Know. In December 2010, she received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In the year 2014, she produced both Gone Girl and Wild for which she got nominated for best actress Oscar again for her role as Cheryl Strayed

Off the screen, she was married to Ryan Phillippe from 1999 to 2007. They met at her 21st birthday party and subsequently worked together in Cruel Intentions. They have two children: a daughter, Ava Elizabeth (born 9 September 1999) and a son, Deacon (born 23 October 2003). In March 2011, Reese remarried talent agent Jim Toth. She gave birth to a second son, Tennessee (born 27 September 2012).

Wentworth Miller

Wentworth Miller is a compelling and critically acclaimed actor whose credits span both television and feature film.

Wentworth Earl Miller III was born June 2, 1972 in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire, England, to American parents, Joy Marie (Palm), a special education teacher, and Wentworth Earl Miller II, a lawyer educator. He has two younger sisters, Gillian and Leigh. His father is of Afro-Jamaican and African-American (along with English and German) descent. His mother has Dutch, French, Swedish, Lebanese/Syrian, Austrian, and Polish ancestry.

When Miller turned a year old, his family moved to Park Slope, Brooklyn, New York. His father became an assistant district attorney over there. Wentworth retains a dual citizenship, but affirms that he has always been an American. He comes from a diverse background. Wentworth attended Midwood High School in Brooklyn, where he was a member of Sing!, an annual musical production that was started by Midwood. He later on transferred to Quaker Valley Senior High School in Sewickley, Pennsylvania. Wentworth was a straight As student in high school and was involved in the AV club and school newspaper. After graduating from high school in 1990, he attended Princeton University. He was also a cartoonist for the school paper and a member of the A Capella group, The Princeton Tigertones, where he sang baritone. It was then that he realized he was interested in performing in front of big and small audiences. Five years later, in 1995, he graduated from Princeton with a bachelor's degree in English Literature and moved to California. That same year, he was hired by a small company who made movies for television. About a year and a half later, he realized that he had unconsciously moved to Los Angeles to be an actor. He then decided to quit his job at the production company even after his employee at the production company had offered him another stable job position.

Unfortunately for Wentworth, breaking into the industry was a tough job for him. He worked as a temp at several production companies before ending up working as a temp for his former employee's production office. It wasn't too long before Wentworth started landing guest roles on show such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, ER, and Popular. He also starred in the Hallmark series, Dinotopia, playing the character, David Scott. These guest spots later on led to a role in the feature film, The Human Stain, which happened to be his breakthrough role, alongside Nicole Kidman and Sir Anthony Hopkins, where he played the younger version of Anthony Hopkins' character, Coleman Silk. Although the film didn't fare well in movie theaters, it was well received by viewers and critics, further catapulting Wentworth to bigger stardom.

After The Human Stain, he appeared in the movie _Underworld_, as Dr Adam Lockwood, opposite Kate Beckinsale and Scott Speedman, playing the voice of EDI. He also guest-starred in the series finale of CBS' Joan of Arcadia, as Ryan Hunter, a charming-yet-sinister man who revealed to Joan that he also spoke to God. It was reported that his character would be Joan's greatest challenge, but in May, CBS decided to cancel the show, leaving fans to wonder what might have been. In 2005, Wentworth appeared in the pilot of Ghost Whisperer before eventually starring on FOX network's Prison Break. Wentworth played the role of Michael Scofield, a character helping his brother, Lincoln Burrows, escape death row after being found guilty of a crime he did not commit. He stars alongside actors, Dominic Purcell, Amaury Nolasco and Robert Knepper. Prison Break became an instant hit and Wentworth secured a spot among viewers as one of the hottest up-and-coming actors around. His performance in the show earned him a Golden Globe nomination, a Saturn award nomination, as well as three Teen Choice Award nominations. The Brooklyn native also appeared in two of Mariah Carey's music videos, "It's Like That" and "We Belong Together" as Mariah's love interest.

Brett Ratner, who was signed on to direct both the music videos, directed the pilot episode of Prison Break and already knew who Wentworth was. Brett then brought up the idea to the songstress about using Wentworth in the videos. After showing Mariah pictures of Wentworth, she agreed to use him and Wentworth managed to work on both the videos and Prison Break with the help of crew members who constructed a special set on the set of the videos. Wentworth even admits that the two days he spent working with Mariah, was in fact, one of his career highs - even topping anything he's ever done prior to Prison Break because it gave him so much exposure. Wentworth describes himself as a very private person who likes to spend time just relaxing at home when he's not working. He enjoys swimming, reading, taking naps as well as going to different restaurants every week. He enjoys spending time at The Art Institute of Chicago because he believes that music, painting, movies and theater can all contribute to the work of an actor.

In 2013, he returned to his writing roots, linking up with acclaimed director Chan-wook Park and penning the screenplay for the film _Stoker_, which he submitted under an alias, Ted Foulke. He has also written a screenplay for a prequel called Uncle Charlie.

Kate Mulgrew

Katherine Kiernan Mulgrew, or Kate Mulgrew, was born on April 29, 1955. She grew up in Dubuque, Iowa, being the oldest girl in an Irish Catholic family of 8. When Kate, as a 12-year-old, expressed an interest in acting, her mother, Joan, brought home biographies of great actresses and sent Kate to summer acting schools. At age 17, she left home and traveled to New York City to study acting. At New York University, she was accepted into Stella Adler's Conservatory. At the end of her junior year, she left the university to commit herself full time to her craft. Her early career included portraying Mary Ryan for two years on the ABC soap opera Ryan's Hope while also playing the role of Emily in the American Shakespeare Theatre production of "Our Town" in Stratford, Connecticut. When Kate was only 23, she played Kate Columbo in a series created especially for her, Mrs. Columbo. In this series, she was playing the wife of one of television's most beloved detectives, Lt. Columbo. While a critical success, the series was canceled after two seasons.

Kate also starred in several feature films, such as Lovespell, A Stranger Is Watching with Rip Torn, Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins and Throw Momma from the Train with Danny DeVito. In 1981, she traveled to Europe to film the ABC miniseries The Manions of America with Pierce Brosnan. About that time, she married theater director Robert H. Egan and, a few years later, she had two sons: Ian Thomas and Alexander James. In the drama series, Heartbeat, Kate played Dr. Joanne Springsteen, the head of a medical clinic. However, in series such as: Murphy Brown, Murder, She Wrote, St. Elsewhere and Cheers, she only had guest roles.

In 1993, Kate separated from her husband, Robert H. Egan, with whom she had been married for 12 years. In 1995, the divorce became final, and she was on the verge of having to sell her house (and move into an apartment in Westwood) when something incredible happened. She had been called to resume a role in a television series after the original actress, Geneviève Bujold, left two days into filming. What she did not know then was that this role was going to become her most famous one. The role in question was Captain Kathryn Janeway in Star Trek: Voyager. At the moment, she played Katharine Hepburn in the play "Tea at Five" on some stages in the United States.

George Clooney

George Timothy Clooney was born on May 6, 1961, in Lexington, Kentucky, to Nina Bruce (née Warren), a former beauty pageant queen, and Nick Clooney, a former anchorman and game show host (who was also the brother of singer Rosemary Clooney). He has Irish, English, and German ancestry. Clooney spent most of this youth in Ohio and Kentucky, and graduated from Augusta High School. He was very active in sports such as basketball and baseball, and tried out for the Cincinnati Reds, but was not offered a contract.

After his cousin, Miguel Ferrer, got him a small part in a feature film, Clooney began to pursue acting. His first major role was on the sitcom E/R as "Ace", an orderly. More roles soon followed, including "George Burnett", the handsome handyman on The Facts of Life; "Booker Brooks", a supervisor on Roseanne; and "Detective James Falconer" on Sisters. Clooney had his breakthrough when he was cast as "Dr. Doug Ross" on the award-winning drama series, ER, opposite Anthony Edwards, Noah Wyle, and Julianna Margulies.

While filming "ER", Clooney starred in a number of high profile film roles, such as Robert Rodriguez's From Dusk Till Dawn, and One Fine Day, opposite Michelle Pfeiffer. In 1997, Clooney took on the role of "Batman" in Joel Schumacher's Batman & Robin. The film was a moderate success in the box office, but was slammed by critics, notably for the nipple-laden Bat suit. Clooney went on to star in Steven Soderbergh's Out of Sight, Terrence Malick's The Thin Red Line, and David O. Russell's Three Kings.

In 1999, Clooney left "ER" (though he would return for the season finale) and appeared in a number of films, including O Brother, Where Art Thou?, The Perfect Storm, and Ocean's Eleven. Collaborating once again with Steven Soderbergh, "Ocean's Eleven" received critical acclaim, earned more than $450 million at the box office, and spawned two sequels: Ocean's Twelve and Ocean's Thirteen.

In 2002, Clooney made his directorial debut with Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, an adaptation of TV producer Chuck Barris's autobiography. This was the first film under the banner of "Section Eight Productions", a production company he founded with Steven Soderbergh. The company also produced many acclaimed films, including Far from Heaven, Syriana, A Scanner Darkly, and Good Night, and Good Luck.. Clooney won his first Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in "Syriana", and was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay for "Good Night, and Good Luck".

In 2006, "Section Eight" was shut down so that Soderbergh could concentrate on directing, and Clooney founded a new production company, "Smokehouse Productions", with his friend and long-time business partner, Grant Heslov.

Clooney went on to produce and star in Michael Clayton (which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Actor), directed and starred in Leatherheads, and took leading roles in Burn After Reading, The Men Who Stare at Goats, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Jason Reitman's Up in the Air. Clooney received critical acclaim for his performance in "Up in the Air" and was nominated for several awards, including a Golden Globe and Academy Award. He didn't win that year, but took home both Best Actor awards (as well as countless nominations) for his role as a father who finds out his wife was unfaithful as she lay in a coma in Alexander Payne's The Descendants. Throughout his career, Clooney has been heralded for his political activism and humanitarian work. He has served as one of the "United Nations Messengers of Peace" since 2008, has been an advocate for the Darfur conflict, and organized the "Hope for Haiti" telethon, to raise money for the victims of the 2010 earthquake. In March of 2012, Clooney was arrested for civil disobedience while protesting at the Sudanese embassy in Washington, D.C.

Clooney was married to actress Talia Balsam, from 1989 until 1993. After their divorce, he swore he would never marry again. Michelle Pfeiffer and Nicole Kidman bet him $10,000 that he would have children by the age of 40, and sent him a check shortly after his birthday. Clooney returned the funds and bet double or nothing he wouldn't have children by the age of 50. Although he has remained a consummate bachelor, Clooney has had many highly publicized relationships, including with former WWE wrestler Stacy Keibler. In 2014, he married lawyer and activist Amal Clooney.

Mark Ruffalo

Mark Ruffalo was born in Kenosha, Wisconsin, to Marie Rose (Hebert), a stylist and hairdresser, and Frank Lawrence Ruffalo, a construction painter. His father's ancestry is Italian, and his mother is of half French-Canadian and half Italian descent. Mark moved with his family to Virginia Beach, Virginia, where he lived out most of his teenage years. Following high school, Mark moved with his family to San Diego and soon migrated north, eventually settling in Los Angeles. He took classes at the Stella Adler Conservatory and subsequently co-founded the Orpheus Theatre Company, an Equity-Waiver establishment, where he worked in nearly every capacity. From acting, writing, directing and producing to running the lights and building sets while building his resume. Bartending for nearly nine years to make ends meet and ready to give it all up, a chance meeting and resulting collaboration with playwright/screenwriter Kenneth Lonergan changed everything.

Ruffalo won NY success in Lonergan's play "This Is Our Youth", which led to the male lead in Lonergan's film You Can Count on Me, playing the ne'er-do-well brother of Laura Linney. The performance drew rave reviews and invited comparisons to an early Marlon Brando. Notable roles in The Last Castle, XX/XY, and Windtalkers followed, although in 2002 Ruffalo was diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma, a type of brain tumor. Though the tumor was benign, the resulting surgery led to a period of partial facial paralysis, from which he fully recovered. In 2003, Ruffalo scored leading roles alongside two popular female stars, playing a police detective opposite Meg Ryan in In the Cut and the love interest of Gwyneth Paltrow in the comedy View from the Top. Though both films were high-profile box office disappointments, Ruffalo went on to four notable (if highly disparate) films in 2004 - We Don't Live Here Anymore, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, 13 Going on 30, and Collateral - which solidified his ability to be both a popular leading man and an acclaimed ensemble player in either comedy or drama.

After 2004, Ruffalo was consistently at work, with leads in popular Hollywood films and independent productions that continued to solidify him as one of film's most consistently strong actors: Just Like Heaven, All the King's Men, Zodiac, Reservation Road, and The Brothers Bloom. In 2010 Ruffalo achieved something of a breakthrough, by directing the indie film Sympathy for Delicious, which won him the Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and co-starring as the sperm-donor father to lesbian couple Annette Bening and Julianne Moore in The Kids Are All Right. His role in the idiosyncratic domestic comedy/drama earned him Academy Award, Independent Spirit Award, Screen Actors Guild, and BAFTA nominations for Best Supporting Actor.

High-profile roles in Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island and 'Kenneth Longeran''s long-delayed Margaret followed before Ruffalo's appearance as Dr. Bruce Banner, aka The Hulk, in Joss Whedon's blockbuster The Avengers. Garnering highly positive reviews for a role in which actors Eric Bana and Edward Norton could not find success in previous films made Ruffalo a box office star in addition to a critically-acclaimed actor. He is expected to reprise the role in the upcoming 2015 sequel, and reunited with former co-star Gywneth Paltrow in the sex-addiction comedy-drama Thanks for Sharing; Ruffalo also will take the lead in Ryan Murphy's adaptation of Larry Kramer's AIDS-drama play The Normal Heart.

Ruffalo has been married to actress Sunrise Coigney since 2000; the couple have three children, a son and two daughters.

Charles Dance

Charles Dance is an English actor, screenwriter, and film director. Dance typically plays assertive bureaucrats or villains. Some of his most high-profile roles are Tywin Lannister in HBO's Game of Thrones, Guy Perron in The Jewel in the Crown (1984), Sardo Numspa in The Golden Child (1986), Dr. Jonathan Clemens in Alien 3 (1992), Benedict in Last Action Hero (1993), the Master Vampire in Dracula Untold (2014), Lord Havelock Vetinari in Terry Pratchett's Going Postal (2010) and Alastair Denniston in The Imitation Game (2014).

He played the role of Tywin Lannister in HBO's Game of Thrones, based on the Song of Ice and Fire novels by George R. R. Martin.

In 1989 he played Bond creator Ian Fleming in Anglia Television's drama biography.

Alan Rickman

Alan Rickman was born on a council estate in Acton, West London, to Margaret Doreen Rose (Bartlett) and Bernard Rickman, who worked at a factory. He had English, Irish, and Welsh ancestry. Alan had an older brother David, a younger brother Michael and a younger sister Sheila. When Alan was 8 years old, his father died. He attended Latymer Upper School on a scholarship. He studied Graphic Design at Chelsea College of Art and Design, where he met Rima Horton, who would later become his life partner. After three years at Chelsea College, Rickman did graduate studies at the Royal College of Art. He opened a successful graphics design business, Graphiti, with friends and ran it for several years before his love of theatre led him to seek an audition with the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). At the relatively late age of 26, Rickman received a scholarship to RADA, which started a professional acting career that has lasted nearly 40 years, a career which has spanned stage, screen and television and lapped over into directing, as well.

Rickman first came to the attention of American audiences as "Vicomte de Valmont" in "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" on Broadway in 1987 (he was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in the role). Denied the role in the film version of the show, Rickman instead made his first movie appearance opposite Bruce Willis in Die Hard as the villain, "Hans Gruber". Rickman's take on the urbane villain set the standard for screen villains for decades to come. Though often cited as being a master of playing villains, Rickman actually played a wide variety of characters, such as the romantic cello-playing ghost "Jamie" in Anthony Minghella's Truly Madly Deeply and the noble "Colonel Brandon" of Sense and Sensibility. He treated audiences to his comedic abilities with films like Dogma, Galaxy Quest and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, and roles like "Dr. Alfred Blalock" in Something the Lord Made and "Alex Hughes" in Snow Cake, showcase his ability to play ordinary men in extraordinary situations. Rickman even conquered the daunting task of singing a part in a Stephen Sondheim musical as he took on the part of "Judge Turpin" in the movie adaptation of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

In 2001, Rickman introduced himself to a whole new, and younger, generation of fans by taking on the role of "Severus Snape" in the movie versions of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. He continued to play the role through the eighth and last movie Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.

Matthew Gray Gubler

Matthew Gray Gubler is an Emmy award winning actor, director, producer, painter, and voice over actor from Las Vegas Nevada. While studying film directing at NYU he interned for Wes Anderson who gave him his first feature film role as Bill Murray's loyal intern "Nico" in The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou.

For the past eleven years Gubler has starred as the lovable genius Dr. Spencer Reid on the internationally popular crime drama Criminal Minds.

Some of his other film acting credits include (500) Days of Summer, Life After Beth, and the cult hit comedy Suburban Gothic for which he was awarded the 2015 Best Actor Award by Screamfest.

In 2014 he won an Emmy for his participation in Drake Doremus' mini series The Beauty Inside.

He has provided the voice of Simon the chipmunk in the wildly popular Alvin and the Chipmunks film franchise and recently voiced the Riddler for DC comic's animated film Batman: Assault on Arkham.

As of 2015, Gubler has directed 8 episodes of Criminal Minds, a behind the scenes documentary of the making of "The Life Aquatic," two music videos for "The Killers," videos for "Whirwlind Heat," and "Soko," as well as a fake mockumentary entitled Matthew Gray Gubler: The Unauthorized Documentary which lampoons his behavior behind the scenes on "Criminal Minds."

Also and accomplished painter, Gubler is known for his vivid and expressionistic portraits of people, animals, and imaginary monsters.

Benicio Del Toro

Benicio Del Toro emerged in the mid-'90s as one of the most watchable and charismatic character actors to come along in years. A favorite of film buffs, Del Toro gained mainstream public attention as the conflicted but basically honest Mexican cop in Steven Soderbergh's Traffic.

Born on February 19, 1967 in San Germán, Puerto Rico, Benicio is the son of lawyer parents Fausta Genoveva Sanchez Rivera and Gustavo Adolfo Del Toro Bermudez. His mother died when he was young, and his father moved the family to a farm in Pennsylvania. A basketball player with an interest in acting, he decided to follow the family way and study business at the University of California in San Diego. A class in acting resulted in his being bitten by the acting bug, and he subsequently dropped out and began studying with legendary acting teacher Stella Adler in Los Angeles and at the Circle in the Square Acting School in New York City. Telling his parents that he was taking courses in business, Del Toro hid his new studies from his family for a little while. During the late 1980s he made a few TV appearances, most notably in an episode of Miami Vice and in the NBC miniseries Drug Wars: The Camarena Story. Del Toro's big-screen career got off to a slower start, however--his first role was Duke the Dog-Faced Boy in Big Top Pee-wee. Things looked better, however, when he landed the role of Dario, the vicious henchman in the James Bond film Licence to Kill. Surprising his co-stars, Del Toro was, at 21, the youngest actor ever to portray a Bond villain. The potential break, however, was spoiled as the picture turned out to be one of the most disappointing Bond films ever; it was lost amid bigger summer competition.

Benicio gave creditable performances in many overlooked films for the next few years, such as The Indian Runner, Christopher Columbus: The Discovery and Money for Nothing. His roles in Fearless and China Moon gained him more critical notices, and 1995 proved to be the first "Year of Benicio" as he gave a memorable performance in Swimming with Sharks before taking critics and film buffs by storm as the mumbling, mysterious gangster in The Usual Suspects, directed by Bryan Singer. Del Toro won an Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting actor for the role in the Oscar-winning film. Staying true to his independent roots, he next gave a charismatic turn as cold-blooded gangster Gaspare in The Funeral directed by Abel Ferrara. He also appeared as Benny Dalmau in Basquiat, directed by artist friend Julian Schnabel. That year also marked his first truly commercial film, as he played cocky Spanish baseball star Juan Primo in The Fan, which starred Robert De Niro. Del Toro took his first leading man role in Excess Baggage, starring and produced by Alicia Silverstone. Hand-picked by Silverstone, Del Toro's performance was pretty much the only thing critics praised about the film, and showed the level of consciousness he was beginning to have in the minds of film fans. In 1998 he took a leading role with Johnny Depp in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, directed by the legendary Terry Gilliam. Gaining 40 pounds for the role of Dr. Gonzo, the drug-addicted lawyer to sports writer Raoul Duke, Benicio immersed himself totally in the role. Using his method acting training so far as to burn himself with cigarettes for a scene, it was a trying time for Del Toro. The harsh critical reviews proved tough on him, as he felt he had given his all for the role and been dismissed. Many saw the crazed, psychotic performance as a confirmation of the rumors and overall weirdness that people seemed to place on Del Toro. Taking a short break after the ordeal, 2000 proved to be the second "Year of Benicio". He first appeared in The Way of the Gun, directed by friend and "The Usual Suspects" writer Christopher McQuarrie. Then he went to work for actor's director Steven Soderbergh in Traffic. A complex and graphic film, it nonetheless became a widespread hit and Oscar winner. Del Toro's Javier Rodriguez, a conflicted Mexican cop, functions as the movie's real heart amid an all-star ensemble cast, and many praised it as the year's best performance, a sentiment validated by a Screen Actor's Guild Award for "Best Actor". He also gave a notable performance in Snatch directed by Guy Ritchie, which was released several weeks later, and The Pledge directed by Sean Penn. Possessing sleepy good looks reminiscent of James Dean or Marlon Brando, Del Toro has often jokingly been referred to as the "Spanish Brad Pitt". With his newfound celebrity, Del Toro has become a sort of heartthrob, being voted one of People's "50 Most Beautiful People" as well as "Most Eligible Bachelors". A favorite of film fans for years for his diverse and "cool guy" gangster roles, he is now becoming a mainstream favorite respected for his acting skills and choices. So far very careful in his choices and who he works with, Del Toro can boast an impressive resume of films with some of the most influential and respected people in the film business.

Tommy Lee Jones

Tommy Lee Jones was born in San Saba, Texas, the son of Lucille Marie (Scott), a police officer and beauty shop owner, and Clyde C. Jones, who worked on oil fields. Tommy himself worked in underwater construction and on an oil rig. He attended St. Mark's School of Texas, a prestigious prep school for boys in Dallas, on a scholarship, and went to Harvard on another scholarship. He roomed with future Vice President Al Gore and played offensive guard in the famous 29-29 Harvard-Yale football game of '68 known as "The Tie." He received a B.A. in English literature and graduated cum laude from Harvard in 1969.

Following college, he moved to New York and began his theatrical career on Broadway in "A Patriot for Me" (1969). In 1970, he made his film debut in Love Story. While living in New York, he continued to appear in various plays, both on- and off-Broadway: "Fortune and Men's Eyes" (1969); "Four on a Garden" (1971); "Blue Boys" (1972); "Ulysses in Nighttown" (1974). During this time, he also appeared on a daytime soap opera, One Life to Live as Dr. Mark Toland from 1971-75. He moved with wife Kate Lardner, granddaughter of short-story writer/columnist Ring Lardner, and her two children from a previous marriage, to Los Angeles.

There he began to get some roles on television: Charlie's Angels (pilot episode); Smash-Up on Interstate 5; and The Amazing Howard Hughes. While working on the movie Back Roads, he met and fell in love with Kimberlea Cloughley, whom he later married. More roles in television--both on network and cable--stage and film garnered him a reputation as a strong, explosive, thoughtful actor who could handle supporting as well as leading roles. He made his directorial debut in The Good Old Boys on TNT. In addition to directing and starring in the film, he co-wrote the teleplay (with J.T. Allen). The film, based on Elmer Kelton's novel, is set in west Texas where Jones has strong family ties. Consequently, this story of a cowboy facing the end of an era has special meaning for him.

Eric Dane

Eric Dane is an American actor known as "Dr. Mark Sloan" on Grey's Anatomy and as a co-star in Marley & Me and Valentine's Day.

He was born on November 9, 1972, in San Francisco, California, the older of two brothers. His father is an architect and interior designer based in San Francisco. His mother, Leah (Cohn), was a homemaker. His ancestry includes English, German, Finnish, Russian Jewish, and Austrian Jewish, and Eric had a Bar Mitzvah ceremony.

Young Eric was a good athlete in high school. There, he started amateur stage work by playing "Joe Keller" in Arthur Miller's "All My Sons", and realized that this was all he wanted to do.

He moved to Los Angeles and made his television debut in 1993 on The Wonder Years. In his early career, he also played bit parts on the TV series Married with Children (1995), Silk Stalkings (1996) and Roseanne (1996). Dane played medical doctors more than once, first appearing as a "Dr. Cooper" in Gideon's Crossing. From 2003-2004, he has been a recurrent guest star as "Jason Dean" in the hit show Charmed. In 2006, he appeared as handsome "Dr. Mark Sloan", the plastic surgeon on the show Grey's Anatomy. Dane landed his first leading role on the big screen in the German-made feature, Open Water 2: Adrift.

On October 29, 2004, in Las Vegas, Eric Dane married actress Rebecca Gayheart, who was previously engaged to producer/director Brett Ratner, the director of X-Men: The Last Stand. In it, Dane plays the character of "Jamie Madrox", the Multiple Man. Dane and Gayheart became the parents of a girl on March 3, 2010 in Los Angeles.

Maria Bello

Maria Bello was born on 18 April, 1967 in Norristown, Pennsylvania, to Kathy, a nurse and teacher, and Joe Bello, a contractor. She is of Italian and Polish descent. Maria went to Villanova University, majoring in political science. She had every intention of becoming a lawyer, but she took an acting class during her senior year, just for fun. She discovered she was very good at it, and she was soon cast in small off-Broadway plays, such as "The Killer Inside Me", "Small Town Gals With Big Problems" and "Urban Planning". She later guest-starred on episodes of The Commish, Nowhere Man, Misery Loves Company and Due South. She got her big break when producers Kenny Lenhart and John J. Sakmar cast her in the spy show Mr. & Mrs. Smith as "Mrs. Smith" (they remembered her from her performance in a failed pilot that was a remake of the classic TV series 77 Sunset Strip). The show was canceled after eight weeks on the air. Then came a spot on ER as "Dr. Anna Del Amico", in which she guest-starred on the final three episodes of the third season. The show's producers were so impressed with her that they asked her back as a regular on the series.

Ian McShane

Ian McShane was born in Blackburn, Lancashire, England, to parents Irene (Cowley) and Harry McShane, a soccer player for Manchester United. His father was Scottish and his mother was of English and Irish descent. Ian originally planned to follow in his father's 'footballer' steps, until his high school teacher encouraged him to be an actor. McShane landed a spot at the prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art where, just before graduation, he got his first break, the lead role in The Wild and the Willing in 1962--he later revealed that he had told his acting teacher that he had a dentist's appointment and ditched class to audition for the role.

From a lawless saloon owner to the sexiest of beastly British mobsters, award-winning actor Ian McShane has, time and time again, captured the public's attention (as well as many plaudits, including from the Hollywood Foreign Press), by playing bad guys, scoundrels and thieves. "The devil has the best tunes!" he has said with a gleam in his eye. McShane was named "TV's Sexiest Villain" by People Magazine, and was one of GQ's "Men of the Year," which described his portrayal of Deadwood's Al Swearengen as "infectious" and "irresistible." Classically trained, with a voice like none other, McShane has a range for rogues and other multi-faceted characters on TV, the silver screen, as a voiceover artist and on the boards.

McShane most recently reprised his role as Winston (club owner/conceivable ex-assassin), opposite 'Keanu Reeves' in John Wick 2 for director Chad Stahelski. He will next be seen as Leland, a retired sheriff with violent tendencies, opposite Patrick Wilson in the gritty drama The Hollow Point for director Gonzalo López-Gallego and Atlas Independent and Relativity. He appears in cameo roles in Sacha Baron Cohen's comedy The Brothers Grimsby for director Louis Leterrier and Sony and in the highly touted Spanish director Daniel Monzón's El Niño. He will next play the corrupt Judge Perry in Bolden! for writer/director Dan Pritzker in the story about the life of jazz innovator Buddy Bolden and Joe Padgett in Jawbone, the indie boxing film written by Johnny Harris and directed by Thomas Q. Napper.

McShane starred as Amphiarus (part priest, part prophet, part warrior),opposite Dwayne Johnson in MGM's Hercules for director Brett Ratner and played Ron, Nick Frost's salsa dance instructor in Cuban Fury, a heartfelt comedy for director James Griffiths and starred as the good King Bramwell in Jack the Giant Slayer for director Bryan Singer in New Line Cinema/Warner Brothers modern-day fairytale.

McShane was the lead dwarf Beith in Universal's Snow White and the Huntsman, the dark fantasy film from director Rupert Sanders and starred in Disney's billion-dollar blockbuster Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides as the fearsome pirate Blackbeard opposite Johnny Depp.

Highlights of McShane's previous film roles include the darkly perverse 44 Inch Chest, which McShane starred in, as well as produced and Woody Allen's Scoop. McShane was singled out for his portrayal of the twisted and handsome Teddy Bass, in the cult indie hit Sexy Beast, which prompted one London critic to name McShane, "The King of Cool." McShane's earlier, break-out parts were as the game-playing Anthony in the 1973 cult favorite The Last of Sheila, as Wolfe Lissner in Villain, Fred C. Dobbs in Pussycat, Pussycat, I Love You, and as ladies man Charlie Cartwright in If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium.

In addition to his screen work, McShane has also made his mark as a voiceover artist. His dulcet tones narrated The Sorcerer's Apprentice and brought life to the eccentric magician Mr. Bobinsky in Coraline, as well as the sinister Tai Lung in Kung Fu Panda. Additionally, he lent his rich, resonant voice to The Golden Compass and to the devilish Captain Hook in Shrek the Third. Most recently he voiced the character of Umayya, a greedy and power-hungry merchant in the independent animated feature Bilal and is the narrator of One, the short film written and directed by Emmanuel Solotareff.

McShane has also enjoyed a long and diverse career on both British and American television. He will next star as Mr. Wednesday in Neil Gaiman's American Gods, the latest event series for Starz, produced by Michael Green and Bryan Fuller and directed by David Slade. "Actor. Icon. And now god. It is a goddamn delight to be collaborating with the incomparable Ian McShane," said Michael Green. McShane played billionaire Andrew Finney opposite Liev Schreiber on the critically acclaimed Showtime series Ray Donovan and Sir Roger Scatcherd in the mini series Dr. Thorne, written by Julian Fellows and directed by Niall MacCormick for ITV and will be appearing in Game of Thrones, the award-winning series for HBO. He was the very, very bad Santa/serial killer in the critically acclaimed series American Horror Story for F/X; he starred in 2010's Emmy-nominated The Pillars of the Earth (also for Starz), as the conniving Waleran Bigod, for which he received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actor in a Mini Series; and starred in the title role in NBC's Kings as the ruthless King Silas Benjamin. Most notably, in 2004, McShane exploded onto the small screen as Al Swearengen on HBO's Deadwood for which he earned the coveted Best Actor in a Television Drama Golden Globe Award. His charismatic and alluring performance also led him to 2005 Emmy and SAG nominations for Lead Actor. About playing Swearengen, McShane has said, "there was humanity tempered by reality, and he was never sentimental."

Earlier in his TV career, he formed McShane Productions, and produced the lauded Lovejoy for the BBC and A&E, in which he starred in the title role of the lovable rogue antiques dealer, as well as directed several episodes. Fans of this beloved series, which first aired in 1986, spanned the continents, and made their voices heard and it was successfully brought back by popular demand, and the series aired again from 1991-1994. McShane also had memorable appearances in the U.S. on Dallas and in the saga War and Remembrance.

McShane played Sejanus in the mini series A.D., the eponymous Disraeli, produced by Masterpiece Theater and Judas in NBC's Jesus of Nazareth He appeared in the U.S. landmark blockbuster Roots and brought pathos to the disabled Ken Harrison in Whose Life Is It Anyway? McShane was the smoldering Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights and also appeared in Harold Pinter's Emmy-Award-winning The Caretaker.

McShane is an accomplished and award-winning stage actor. In 2008, he celebrated two anniversaries: the 40th Anniversary revival of Harold Pinter's The Homecoming on Broadway and the 40th Anniversary of his Broadway debut. He made his musical debut in the West End production of The Witches of Eastwick, as the devilish Darryl Van Horne. In Los Angeles, he starred in a trio of productions at The Matrix Theatre, including the world premiere of Larry Atlas' Yield of the Long Bond, (for which he received the 1984 Los Angeles Drama Critics' Circle Award), Inadmissible Evidence and Betrayal. His other stage work includes roles as Hal in the original cast of Joe Orton's Loot, as The Admirable Crichton at the Chichester Festival, as Tom in The Glass Menagerie and as Charlie in The Big Knife. McShane's West End debut in 1967 was in The Promise, where he co-starred with Judi Dench and Ian McKellen. The play was brought to Broadway in 1968.

Tim Curry

Timothy James Curry was born on April 19, 1946 in Grappenhall, Cheshire, England. His mother, Maura Patricia (Langmead), was a school secretary, and his father, James Curry, was a Methodist Royal Navy chaplain. Curry studied Drama and English at Birmingham University, from which he graduated with Combined Honors. His first professional success was in the London production of "Hair", followed by more work in the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Glasgow Civic Repertory Company, and the Royal Court Theatre where he created the role of Dr. Frank-N-Furter in "The Rocky Horror Show". He recreated the role in the Los Angeles and Broadway productions and starred in the screen version entitled The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Curry continued his career on the New York and London stages with starring roles in "Travesties", "Amadeus", "The Pirates of Penzance", "The Rivals", "Love for Love", "Dalliance", "The Threepenny Opera", "The Art of Success" and "My Favorite Year". He also starred in the United States tour of "Me and My Girl". He has received two Tony Award nominations for best actor and won the Royal Variety Club Award as "Stage Actor of the Year".

A composer and a singer, Tim Curry toured the United States and Europe with his own band and released four albums on A&M Records. In addition to an active movie and television career, he is a sought-after actor for CD-ROM productions. His distinctive voice can be heard on more than a dozen audio books, and in countless animated television series and videos. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

Sarah Wayne Callies

Sarah Wayne Callies was born in La Grange, Illinois, and was raised in Honolulu, Hawaii, the daughter of Valerie Wayne, an professor of English, and David E. Callies, a law professor. She graduated from Dartmouth College and received a Master of Fine Arts degree from Denver's National Theatre Conservatory.

Her breakout role was in the hit AMC series The Walking Dead as "Lori Grimes". Prior to The Walking Dead, Sarah was a series regular on the FOX TV series Prison Break, playing the role of Dr. Sara Tancredi. Additional television credits include the role of "Officer Jane Porter" on the WB's Tarzan as well as a recurring role on CBS' Queens Supreme with Oliver Platt. Callies has also appeared on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, and Dragnet. She has also starred in three feature films, Bittersweet, Stewart Hendler's Whisper for Universal Pictures and Barnet Bain's independent, The Celestine Prophecy.

Ron Howard

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Ron Howard is one of this generation's most popular directors. From the critically acclaimed dramas A Beautiful Mind and Apollo 13 to the hit comedies Parenthood and Splash, he has created some of Hollywood's most memorable films.

Howard directed and produced "Cinderella Man" starring Oscar winner Russell Crowe, with whom he previously collaborated on "A Beautiful Mind", for which Howard earned an Oscar for Best Director and which also won awards for Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress. The film garnered four Golden Globes as well, including the award for Best Motion Picture Drama. Additionally, Howard won Best Director of the Year from the Directors Guild of America. Howard and producer Brian Grazer received the first annual Awareness Award from the National Mental Health Awareness Campaign for their work on the film.

Howard's skill as a director has long been recognized. In 1995, he received his first Best Director of the Year award from the DGA for "Apollo 13". The true-life drama also garnered nine Academy Award nominations, winning Oscars for Best Film Editing and Best Sound. It also received Best Ensemble Cast and Best Supporting Actor awards from the Screen Actor's Guild. Many of Howard's past films have received nods from the Academy, including the popular hits "Backdraft", "Parenthood" and "Cocoon", the last of which took home two Oscars. Howard was honored by the Museum of Moving Images in December 2005, and by the American Cinema Editors in February 2006. Howard and his creative partner Brian Grazer, were honored by the Producers Guild of America with the Milestone Award in January 2009, NYU's Tisch School of Cinematic Arts with the Big Apple Award in November 2009 and by the Simon Wiesenthal Center with their Humanitarian Award in May 2010. In June 2010, Howard was honored by the Chicago Film Festival with their Gold Hugo - Career Achievement Award. In March 2013, Howard was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame. In December 2015, Howard was honored with a star in the Motion Pictures category, making him one of the very few to have been recognized with two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Recently, Howard directed "Inferno", the third installment of Dan Brown's Robert Langdon franchise and "8 Days A Week-The Touring Years", a documentary about the rock legends The Beatles. He is also producing second season of "Breakthrough", "Mars", and is directing the first episode of The Genius Series based on the life of Einstein, all for NatGeo.

Howard's recent films include the critically acclaimed drama "Rush", staring Chris Hemsworth and Daniel Brüel, written by Peter Morgan; and "Made In America", a music documentary he directed staring Jay Z for Showtime.

Howard also produced and directed the film adaptation of Peter Morgan's critically acclaimed play "Frost / Nixon". The film, which was released in December 2009, was nominated for five Academy Awards including Best Picture, and was also nominated for The Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award in Theatrical Motion Pictures by the PGA.

Howard's portfolio includes some of the most popular films of the past 20 years. In 1991, Howard created the acclaimed drama "Backdraft", starring Robert De Niro, Kurt Russell and William Baldwin. He followed it with the historical epic "Far and Away", starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. Howard directed Mel Gibson, Rene Russo, Gary Sinise and Delroy Lindo in the 1996 suspense thriller "Ransom". Howard worked with Tom Hanks, Kevin Bacon, Ed Harris, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise and Kathleen Quinlan on "Apollo 13", which was re-released recently in the IMAX format.

Howard's other films include "In The Heart of the Sea", based on the true story that inspired Moby Dick; his adaptation of Dan Brown's best-selling novels "Angels & Demons", and "The Da Vinci Code" staring Oscar winner Tom Hanks; the blockbuster holiday favorite "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas" starring Jim Carrey; "Parenthood" starring Steve Martin; the fantasy epic "Willow"; "Night Shift" starring Henry Winkler, Michael Keaton and Shelley Long; and the suspenseful western, "The Missing", staring Oscar winners Cate Blachett and Tommy Lee Jones.

Howard has also served as an executive producer on a number of award-winning films and television shows, such as the HBO miniseries "From the Earth to the Moon", Fox's Emmy Award winner for Best Comedy, "Arrested Development", a series which he also narrated, Netflix's release of new episodes of "Arrested Development", and NBC's "Parenthood".

Howard made his directorial debut in 1978 with the comedy "Grand Theft Auto". He began his career in film as an actor. He first appeared in "The Journey" and "The Music Man", then as Opie on the long-running television series "The Andy Griffith Show". Howard later starred in the popular series "Happy Days" and drew favorable reviews for his performances in "American Graffiti" and "The Shootist".

Howard and long-time producing partner Brian Grazer first collaborated on the hit comedies "Night Shift" and "Splash". The pair co-founded Imagine Entertainment in 1986 to create independently produced feature films.

Willem Dafoe

Willem Dafoe was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, to Muriel Isabel (Sprissler), a nurse, and Dr. William Alfred Dafoe, a surgeon. He is of German, French, English, Irish, and Scottish descent. In 1979, Dafoe was given a small role in Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate from which he was fired. His first feature role came shortly after in Kathryn Bigelow's The Loveless. From there, he went on to perform in over 80 films - in Hollywood (John Carter, Spider-Man, The English Patient, Finding Nemo, Once Upon a Time in Mexico, Clear and Present Danger, White Sands, Mississippi Burning, Streets of Fire, American Dreamz) and in independent cinema in the U.S. (The Clearing, Animal Factory, The Boondock Saints, American Psycho) and abroad (Theo Angelopoulos' The Dust of Time, Yim Ho's Pavilion of Women, Yurek Bogayevicz's Edges of the Lord, Wim Wenders' Faraway, So Close, Nobuhiro Suwa's segment of Paris, je t'aime, Brian Gilbert's Tom & Viv, Christian Carion's Farewell, _Mr. Bean's Holiday and The Spierig Brothers' Daybreakers_, Daniel Nettheim's The Hunter). He has chosen projects for diversity of roles and opportunities to work with strong directors. He has worked in the films of Wes Anderson (The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, Fantastic Mr. Fox), Martin Scorsese (The Aviator, The Last Temptation of Christ), Spike Lee (Inside Man), Julian Schnabel (Miral, Basquiat), Paul Schrader (Auto Focus, Affliction, Light Sleeper, The Walker, Adam Resurrected), David Cronenberg (eXistenZ), Abel Ferrara (4:44 Last Day on Earth, Go Go Tales, New Rose Hotel), David Lynch (Wild at Heart), William Friedkin (To Live and Die in L.A.), Werner Herzog (My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done, Oliver Stone (Born on the Fourth of July, Platoon), Giada Colagrande (A Woman and Before It Had a Name) and Lars von Trier (Antichrist and Manderlay). He was nominated twice for the Academy Award (Platoon and Shadow of the Vampire) and once for the Golden Globe. Among other nominations and awards, he received an LA Film Critics Award and an Independent Spirit Award. Upcoming films include Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel, Anton Corbjin's A Most Wanted Man, Lars von Trier's Nymphomaniac: Vol. I, Scott Cooper's Out of the Furnace Josh Boone's The Fault In Our Stars (2014)_, David Leitch and Chad Stahelski's John Wick (2014)_, and Chris Brinker's Bad Country. Dafoe is one of the founding members of The Wooster Group, the New York based experimental theatre collective. He created and performed in all of the group's work from 1977 thru 2005, both in the U.S. and internationally. Since then, he worked with Richard Foreman in Idiot Savant at The Public Theatre (NYC) and most recently the international productions of Robert Wilson's The Life & Death of Marina Abramovic abroad and Robert Wilson's The Old Woman with Mikhail Baryshnikov.

Jude Law

Jude Law is a talented and versatile actor. Law has been nominated for two Academy Awards and continues to build a prolific body of work that spans from early successes such as Gattaca and The Talented Mr. Ripley to more recent turns as Dr. John Watson in Sherlock Holmes and Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows, as Hugo's father in Hugo and in the titular role in Dom Hemingway.

David Jude Law was born on December 29, 1972 in Lewisham, London, England, to Margaret Anne (Heyworth) and Peter Robert Law, both of whom taught at comprehensive schools; his father later became a headmaster. Law has said that he was named after both the book Jude the Obscure and the song Hey Jude.

In 1992, Jude began his stage career. He starred in many plays throughout London, and was nominated for the Laurence Olivier Award of "Outstanding Newcomer" After doing the play "Indiscretions" in London, he moved and did it again on Broadway. This time, he was alongside Kathleen Turner. He then received a Tony Nomination for "Outstanding Supporting Actor". He was then rewarded the Theatre World Award. After Broadway, Jude started on the big screen, in many independent films. His first big-named movie was Gattaca, with Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawke. He also had a good role in Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. Jude's latest rise to fame has been because of The Talented Mr. Ripley, in which he plays Matt Damon's obsession. The film did very well at the box office, and critics loved Jude's acting.

Following the success of Gattaca and The Talented Mr. Ripley, Law's feature film career continued to gain momentum throughout the late 1990s and early 2000s with roles in such films as Enemy at the Gates, Road to Perdition, I Heart Huckabees, The Aviator and many others. Law is one of three actors, along with Colin Farrell and Johnny Depp, to take over acting responsibilities in the Terry Gilliam project The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus following Heath Ledger's death.

Law is a partner in the production company "Natural Nylon". His partners include Jonny Lee Miller, Ewan McGregor and his ex-wife Sadie Frost.

Law has been active in many charitable activities and supports several different foundations and causes, doing work for organizations including the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Make Poverty History, Breast Cancer Care and others. Law is also a peace advocate, and in 2011, participated in street protests against the rule of Alexander Lukashenko in Belarus.

Law married Sadie Frost in 1997 and the couple had two sons (Rafferty and Rudy) and a daughter (Iris) before divorcing in 2003. Law and Alfie co-star Sienna Miller were engaged to be married in 2005 and separated in 2006 (they would later rekindle their relationship in 2009, splitting once again in 2011). Law and American model Samantha Burke had a brief relationship in 2008 that resulted in the birth of Law's fourth child, daughter Sophia. Law's fifth child, with an ex-girlfriend, Catherine Harding, was born in 2015.

Zoie Palmer

Zoie Palmer is an English-Canadian actress, born in Camborne, Cornwall, England, to parents of Irish and British descent. She earned her B.F.A. at York University in Toronto, Canada, in 2001; and has since been featured in a variety of film and television projects, including the critically acclaimed The Reagans as Patti Reagan and Out of the Ashes as Didi Goldstein; and starred as Abby in Devil's Perch. Palmer has guest-starred in several television series, such as The CW action drama Nikita in the episode "Girl's Best Friend" as Anya Vimer; in the HBO Canada comedy Call Me Fitz episode "Don of Differently Abled" as Laura (2011); and the CTV crime drama The Listener episode "The Shooting" as Staff Sgt. McCoy (2012). She had a recurring role in the popular CTV music drama Instant Star as rock singer Patsy Sewer (2006-2007); was a co-lead in the Global drama The Guard as Carly Greig; and starred as Dr. Lauren Lewis in the groundbreaking Showcase supernatural drama Lost Girl. Zoie plays the main role of The Android in the science fiction series Dark Matter. Film work includes the award winning short Terminal Venus as Annabelle; horror thriller Devil as Cheryl; crime thriller Cold Blooded as officer Frances Jane; comedy Sex After Kids as Lou; and the fantasy adventure Patch Town as Bethany. In 2011, Zoie Palmer was nominated for "Outstanding Performance - Female" by ACTRA for her performance as Haley in The Untitled Work of Paul Shepard. She was awarded "Best Actor" for "Terminal Venus" at the 2004 Baja Film Festival (Mexico), and the "Gold Medallion Acting Award for Best Actress in a Feature Film" for "Cold Blooded" by the 2012 BareBones International Film Festival (US). In 2014, Palmer received the "Fan Choice Award for Favourite Canadian Screen Star" by the Canadian Screen Awards.

Ellen Pompeo

Ellen Kathleen Pompeo was born in Everett, Massachusetts, to Kathleen B. (O'Keefe) and Joseph E. Pompeo, a salesman. She is of Italian (from her paternal grandfather), Irish, and some English, ancestry.

Pompeo made her major studio screen debut in Brad Silberling's Moonlight Mile, starring alongside Susan Sarandon, Dustin Hoffman and Jake Gyllenhaal. She received outstanding reviews for her portrayal of an outspoken young woman carrying a silent burden that's breaking her heart.

Pompeo starred opposite Luke Wilson, Vince Vaughn and Will Ferrell in the wildly successful Old School and, before that, in Steven Spielberg's Catch Me If You Can, opposite Leonardo DiCaprio.

Pompeo has starred in several independent features, including In the Weeds and Coming Soon, and Life of the Party. Since 2005, she has played Dr. Meredith Grey on the television series Grey's Anatomy.

Jason Sudeikis

Daniel Jason Sudeikis was born on September 18, 1975 in Fairfax, Virginia, to Kathryn (Wendt), a former a travel agent at Brennco and president of the American Society of Travel Agents, and Daniel Joseph Sudeikis, a vice president of business development. He is of Lithuanian and Irish descent on his father's side, and German and Irish ancestry on his mother's. As a child, he moved with his family to Overland Park, Kansas, which he has described as his hometown. He attended Brookridge Elementary School before transferring to Holy Cross Catholic School; both are located in Overland Park. He began high school at the Jesuit Rockhurst High School in 1990, later transferring due to academic reasons to Shawnee Mission West High School.

He began performing at ComedySportz (now Comedy City) in Kansas City. After moving to Chicago, he studied at the Annoyance Theatre and ImprovOlympic, where he was one of the founding members of the long-form team J.T.S. Brown. He was later cast in The Second City's National Touring Company, and also performed with Boom Chicago in Amsterdam. In the early 2000s, he became a founding member of Second City Las Vegas. He continues to frequently perform at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre's weekly improv show ASSSCAT 3000 in New York City. In 2003, while a regular performer at Second City Las Vegas, he was hired as a sketch writer for NBC's Saturday Night Live and would occasionally make bit appearances as audience members or extras. In May 2005, he became a featured player and was upgraded to repertory status in 2006. In July 2013, he announced that he was leaving SNL.

In 2007-2010, he had a recurring role as Floyd on NBC's 30 Rock, playing the love interest of Liz Lemon (played by friend Tina Fey) and appearing in 12 episodes. His voice-over work include video-game Grand Theft Auto IV, playing the role of right-wing radio host Richard Bastion. In 2008, he also appeared in the comedy What Happens in Vegas, playing the role of Cameron Diaz's character's ex-fiancé, in The Rocker as David Marshall, opposite Rainn Wilson, Emma Stone, and Josh Gad, in Semi-Pro as Nacho Fan, in Childrens Hospital as Dr. Robert 'Bobby' Fiscus, and co-starred with Bill Hader and Joe Lo Truglio in the Lorne Michaels-produced web-series "The Line on Crackle". In 2010, he appeared in The Bounty Hunter, alongside Jennifer Aniston and Gerard Butler, playing a colleague of Aniston's character, who falls in love with her, in Going the Distance as Box, and also co-hosted Episode dated 16 August 2010 with his "Going the Distance" co-stars Charlie Day and Justin Long at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. He also worked with Day on It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia playing Schmitty on two episodes.

In FOX's animated comedy The Cleveland Show, he provided the voices of Holt Richter and Terry Kimple in almost all of episodes until the series' end in 2013, and had a recurring role on the cult comedy Eastbound & Down. His first lead film role, alongside Owen Wilson, was in Farrelly brothers comedy Hall Pass. That year, he also appeared in Seth Gordon comedy Horrible Bosses, opposite Jamie Foxx, Kevin Spacey, Jennifer Aniston, Colin Farrell, Charlie Day, and Jason Bateman, and in A Good Old Fashioned Orgy. He also hosted 2011 MTV Movie Awards. His other movies include The Campaign, opposite Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis, Movie 43, Drinking Buddies, Epic, and We're the Millers. He also starred in Horrible Bosses 2, and in Sleeping with Other People. He can also be seen in the romantic comedy, Tumbledown opposite Rebecca Hall and in Race as Larry Snyder, Jesse Owens' coach.

He is also Henry, a widowed and introverted architect, in The Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, in Mother's Day, opposite Jennifer Aniston for the fifth time, is the voice of Red in The Angry Birds Movie, and is playing a recurring character, Mike Miller, on The Last Man on Earth. He is also starring in Masterminds, opposite Zach Galifianakis, Owen Wilson, and Kristen Wiig, in Colossal, opposite Anne Hathaway, in Permission, again with Rebecca Hall, in Son of Zorn as the voice of Zorn, and in Alexander Payne's Downsizing.

Audrey Hepburn

Audrey Hepburn was born Audrey Kathleen Ruston on May 4, 1929 in Brussels, Belgium. She was a blue-blood and a cosmopolitan from birth. Her mother, Ella van Heemstra, was a Dutch baroness, and her father, Joseph Victor Anthony Ruston, was born in Úzice, Bohemia, of English and Austrian descent, and worked in business.

After her parents divorced, Audrey went to London with her mother where she went to a private girls school. Later, when her mother moved back to the Netherlands, she attended private schools as well. While she vacationed with her mother in Arnhem, Netherlands, Hitler's army took over the town. It was here that she fell on hard times during the Nazi occupation. Audrey suffered from depression and malnutrition.

After the liberation, she went to a ballet school in London on a scholarship and later began a modeling career. As a model, she was graceful and, it seemed, she had found her niche in life--until the film producers came calling. In 1948, after being spotted modeling by a producer, she was signed to a bit part in the European film Dutch in Seven Lessons.

Later, she had a speaking role in the 1951 film, Young Wives' Tale as Eve Lester. The part still wasn't much, so she headed to America to try her luck there. Audrey gained immediate prominence in the US with her role in Roman Holiday in 1953. This film turned out to be a smashing success, and she won an Oscar as Best Actress. This gained her enormous popularity and more plum roles.

In contrast to the "sex goddesses" of the silver screen, Audrey Hepburn had a more wholesome beauty and an aura of innocence and class about her which gained her many devoted fans.

Roman Holiday was followed by another similarly wonderful performance in the 1957 classic Funny Face. Sabrina, in 1954, for which she received another Academy nomination, and Love in the Afternoon, in 1957, also garnered rave reviews. In 1959, she received yet another nomination for her role in The Nun's Story.

Audrey reached the pinnacle of her career when she played Holly Golightly in the delightful film Breakfast at Tiffany'sin 1961. For this she received another Oscar nomination. She scored commercial success again in the espionage caper Charade. One of Audrey's most radiant roles was in the fine production of My Fair Lady in 1964. Her co-star, Rex Harrison, once was asked to identify his favorite leading lady. Without hesitation, he replied, "Audrey Hepburn in 'My Fair Lady.'" After a couple of other movies, most notably Two for the Road, she hit pay dirt and another nomination in 1967's Wait Until Dark.

By the end of the sixties, after her divorce from actor Mel Ferrer, Audrey decided to retire while she was on top. Later she married Dr. Andrea Dotti. From time to time, she would appear on the silver screen. One film of note was Robin and Marian, with Sean Connery in 1976.

In 1988, Audrey became a special ambassador to the United Nations UNICEF fund helping children in Latin America and Africa, a position she retained until 1993. She was named to People's magazine as one of the 50 most beautiful people in the world. Her last film was Always in 1989.

Audrey Hepburn died on January 20, 1993 in Tolochnaz, Switzerland, from appendicular cancer. She had made a total of 31 high quality movies. Her elegance and style will always be remembered in film history as evidenced by her being named in Empire magazine's "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time."

Patrick Dempsey

Patrick Dempsey has lived two charming but separate lives on film and television. From an exuberant, somewhat awkward charmer in college comedy films of the late 1980s and early 1990s, he has morphed spectacularly into a dreamy, wavy-haired television hunk of the new-age millennium and this seductive new image has since spilled off into romantic lead roles back on the large screen as a slightly offbeat, self-effacing Prince Charming type.

Patrick Galen Dempsey was born on January 13, 1966 in Lewiston, Maine, to M. Amanda (Casson) and William Allen Dempsey. He is the youngest of three. His father, an insurance agent, and his mother, a school secretary, raised the children in Buckfield (Maine). His parents were both originally from Pennsylvania, and he has German, English, and Scottish ancestry ("Dempsey" was the surname of his step-grandfather). Patrick, who was diagnosed as dyslexic (he has to fully memorize his scripts), attended St. Dominic Regional High School but dropped out before graduating.

Always interested in entertainment, Patrick studied juggling and entered several competitions. Acting was also a natural for him and, at age 15, he earned the role of the rebellious son in a Maine production of "On Golden Pond". Two years later, he won a prime role as David, the gay teen, in the Harvey Fierstein play "Torch Song Trilogy", spending several months touring the San Francisco area with the show. In between he, found supplementary gigs dancing and juggling. More opportunities came his way after winning the protagonist role of Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" that toured in 1984. Directed by the renowned comedy favorite Gene Saks, Dempsey started looking at the possibility of film work.

He made his movie debut in the secondary part of a Catholic student in the 1960s-era school-age comedy Heaven Help Us starring "Brat Pack" actor Andrew McCarthy. More silliness followed with Meatballs III: Summer Job and a ripe turn in the socially aware television-movie A Fighting Choice in which he played an epileptic teen who sues his parents (Beau Bridges and Karen Valentine) in order to have risky brain surgery. Around the same time, he found himself in a television series entitled Fast Times, based on the ultimate school-age film Fast Times at Ridgemont High, which made a star out of Sean Penn. Inheriting the Robert Romanus cool guy role of con artist Mike Damone, expectations were far too big and the television series died a quick death.

However, his movie career got on a faster track and he scored well co-starring with the worldly Beverly D'Angelo in the movie In the Mood, as a young man who makes headlines pursuing older women. Life resembled art that same year when Patrick married actress and drama coach Rocky Parker, who played a bit part in the film. He was 21 and she was 48. By this time, his trademark cuteness and appeal started taking shape. The youthful 21-year old Patrick played a nerd role next in the very funny high school comedy Can't Buy Me Love with Amanda Peterson. A movie favorite for many, Patrick had reached the peak of his early career popularity. He showed a more serious side in the World War II-era drama In a Shallow Grave, which presented a Cyrano de Bergerac-like storyline with Patrick as the Christian de Neuvillette counterpart, but then he went straight back to familiar territory with the college-themed comedies Some Girls with Jennifer Connelly, Loverboy, and Happy Together.

Stretching more in the 1990s, Patrick co-starred on stage in a 1991 production of "The Subject Was Roses" (playing the Martin Sheen film role) as the World War II soldier readjusting to civilian life with his parents (Dana Ivey and "Frasier" co-star John Mahoney). Films included the cross-country comedy-drama Coupe de Ville, the action thriller Run, Mobsters, in which he made a stab at playing major Mafioso Meyer Lansky, Face the Music opposite "Brat Pack" femme Molly Ringwald, the title role in Bank Robber, and the Mark Twain family-geared Ava's Magical Adventure, co-directed by Patrick and wife Rocky. However, the couple divorced that same year. On television, Patrick played a young John Fitzgerald Kennedy in the miniseries J.F.K.: Reckless Youth, Pierre Arronax in the television remake of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and Raskolnikov in a small screen version of Crime and Punishment. The rest of the decade on film was less newsworthy with co-starring or featured movie roles in Hugo Pool, Denial, Life in the Fast Lane and Me and Will.

It was television that gave Patrick a shot in the arm as he progressed into the new millennium. A recurring role as Will's closeted sportscaster amour in the sitcom Will & Grace presented Patrick in a more mature, wry and sexier fashion. Another recurring role in Once and Again earned him a dramatic Emmy nomination in 2001 as Outstanding Guest Actor, and a third on The Practice was also extremely well-received. While the romantic comedy film Sweet Home Alabama opposite Reese Witherspoon really nailed the direction Dempsey was headed, the medical series Grey's Anatomy, as neurosurgeon Dr. Derek Shepherd (aka "Dr. McDreamy"), gave distaff audiences the whole heartthrob package. The perfect vehicle to showcase his undeniable charisma and sharp talent for offbeat comedy, he is a two-time Golden Globe nominee and his popularity has absolutely skyrocketed. This reawakening has also swung the door open again on high-profile film offers, registering with the ladies once again in a number of light leading man parts, notably Enchanted and Made of Honor.

Off-camera, Dempsey married a second time in 1999, to make-up artist and Delux Beauty founder Jillian Dempsey. The couple have three children: daughter, Tallulah Fyfe (born 2002), and twin sons Darby Galen and Sullivan Patrick (born 2007). An avid sports car racer (he has participated in the Indianapolis and Daytona Beach events), he showed off a more humanitarian side when he started the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope and Healing in his hometown of Lewiston after his mother developed ovarian cancer. Befittingly, he has produced a sexy men's fragrance line by Avon called "Unscripted".

Nathan Fillion

Nathan Fillion was born on 27 March 1971, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. He is the younger son of Cookie and Bob Fillion, both retired English teachers. He has an older brother, Jeff. In Canada, he attended Holy Trinity Catholic High School, Concordia University College of Alberta and University of Alberta. Before moving to New York City in 1994, he participated in improv theatre, including Theatresports with Rapid Fire Theatre and improvised soap opera Die-Nasty. He also appeared in a TV Movie Ordeal in the Arctic starring Richard Chamberlain and in Strange and Rich.

Fillion's first regular role was on a daytime soap opera, One Life to Live, as Joey Buchanan, for which role he was nominated in 1996 for a Daytime Emmy Award. He left the series after three years in 1997. During the late 1990's, he appeared in small roles in the films Saving Private Ryan and Blast from the Past. Fillion also guest starred on Das Bootie, Mama's Got a Brand New Bag and Star Crossed. His biggest break by then happened in 1998, when he was cast as Johnny Donnelly on the 2nd season of Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place opposite Traylor Howard, Ryan Reynolds, Richard Ruccolo and Suzanne Cryer. He starred on the show for 60 episodes.

After "Two Guys" ended in 2001, Fillion gained critical acclaim and a large cult of fans when he starred as Captain Malcolm Reynolds on the Joss Whedon's Firefly. Unfortunately the show was prematurely canceled in late 2002. He also guest starred on several episodes of two short lived TV shows, Pasadena, as Rev. Glenn Collins and Miss Match, as Adam Logan. In 2003, Whedon gave Fillion another chance to display his range when he cast Fillion as the twisted preacher Caleb, a villain, in the final season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Before and after "Firefly", Fillion appeared in many movies, Dracula 2000, Alligator Point, Water's Edge, If Dad Only Knew and Hollywood Division.

Whedon vowed to resurrect "Firefly" in some way, and Fillion played Captain Reynolds again in the feature-film Serenity. Fillion followed this film with more big screen leading roles, in the horror-comedy Slither, in White Noise 2: The Light, in the indie hit Waitress opposite Keri Russell and in Trucker. He also continued to be a force in television, starring in the short-lived Fox-TV series Drive and appearing on a recurring role as Dr. Adam Mayfair on the 4th season of ABC's Desperate Housewives, opposite Dana Delany. He also appeared on I Do and was a voice actor on many video games (e.g. Halo 3).

In 2008, he took his first singing part (and cemented his cult appeal) as Captain Hammer in Whedon's musical Internet smash Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog, with Neil Patrick Harris, Felicia Day and Simon Helberg. In 2009, he was cast as the title character Richard Castle in ABC's hit television series, Castle. The show has aired more than 160 episodes and Nathan Fillion has won four People's Choice Awards for Favorite Dramatic TV Actor, as of 2016. Besides starring on "Castle", he has appeared in many movies, in Super as The Holy Avenger, in Joss Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing as Dogberry, the incompetent chief of security, in Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters as Hermes and in Thrilling Adventure Hour Live.

His credits as a voice-actor are numerous: on Bright Lights, Dean City as Brown Widow, in Wonder Woman as Steve Trevor, in Green Lantern: Emerald Knights, Justice League: Doom, Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox and Justice League: Throne of Atlantis as Hal Jordan/Green Lantern, in Robot Chicken: DC Comics Special as Green Lantern/Mr. Freeze, on American Dad!, in Pixar's Monsters University as Johnny, in Guardians of the Galaxy as Monstrous Inmate and on Gravity Falls as Preston Northwest. He also voices the lead, Shojun in the animated movie, Yamasong: March of the Hollows. He has also continued voicing characters in video games, such as in Destiny and in Halo 5: Guardians.

He has also guest starred on The Daly Superheroes as himself, on Community as Bob Waite, on The Comic Book Store Regeneration as himself, on Twins as Mountie McMinniman, on Con Man as Jack Moore and on Space as Wernher Von Braun. He also narrated the documentary, Highway of Tears.

Becky G.

Becky G was born as Rebecca Marie Gomez on March 2, 1997 in California, to Mexican-American parents Alejandra and Frank Gomez. She is the oldest of four children. In 2007, her family lost their home due to financial problems. They moved to the converted garage of their grandparents' home in Los Angeles. There, Gomez posted videos of herself dancing and singing on Youtube. Like most stars, she was discovered on Youtube. Becky is managed by Dr. Luke of Sony Music Entertainment. Her best selling singles include; "Becky from the Block", "Play it Again" and "Oath" (feat.Cher Lloyd).

Marilyn Monroe

Marilyn Monroe was born Norma Jeane Mortenson on June 1, 1926 in Los Angeles, California. Her mother was a film-cutter at RKO Studios who, widowed and mentally ill, abandoned her to a sequence of foster homes. She was almost smothered to death at two, nearly raped at six. At nine, the LA Orphans' Home paid her a nickel a month for kitchen work while taking back a penny every Sunday for church. At sixteen, she worked in an aircraft plant and married a man she called Daddy; he went into the military, she modeled, they divorced in 1946. She owned 200 books (including Tolstoy, Whitman, Milton), listened to Beethoven records, studied acting at the Actors' lab in Hollywood, and took literature courses at UCLA downtown. 20th Century Fox gave her a contract but let it lapse a year later. In 1948, Columbia gave her a six-month contract, turned her over to coach Natasha Lytess and featured her in the B movie Ladies of the Chorus in which she sang three numbers : "Every Baby Needs a Da Da Daddy", "Anyone Can Tell I Love You" and "The Ladies of the Chorus" with Adele Jergens (dubbed by Virginia Rees) and others. Joseph L. Mankiewicz saw her in a small part in The Asphalt Jungle and put her in All About Eve, resulting in 20th Century re-signing her to a seven-year contract. Niagara and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes launched her as a sex symbol superstar.

When she went to a supper honoring her in the The Seven Year Itch, she arrived in a red chiffon gown borrowed from the studio (she had never owned a gown). That same year, she married and divorced baseball great Joe DiMaggio (their wedding night was spent in Paso Robles, California). After The Seven Year Itch, she wanted serious acting to replace the sexpot image and went to New York's Actors Studio. She worked with director Lee Strasberg and also underwent psychoanalysis to learn more about herself. Critics praised her transformation in Bus Stop and the press was stunned by her marriage to playwright Arthur Miller. True to form, she had no veil to match her beige wedding dress so she dyed one in coffee; he wore one of the two suits he owned. They went to England that fall where she made The Prince and the Showgirl with Laurence Olivier, fighting with him and falling further prey to alcohol and pills. Two miscarriages and gynecological surgery followed. So did an affair with Yves Montand. Work on her last picture The Misfits, written for her by departing husband Miller was interrupted by exhaustion. She was dropped from the unfinished Something's Got to Give due to chronic lateness and drug dependency.

On August 4, 1962, Marilyn Monroe's day began with threatening phone calls. Dr. Ralph Greenson, Marilyn's physician, came over the following day and quoted later in a document "felt it was possible that Marilyn Monroe had felt rejected by some of the people she had been close to". Apart from being upset that her publicist slept too long, she seemed fine. Pat Newcombe, who had stayed the previous night at Marilyn's house, left in the early evening as did Greenson who had a dinner date. Marilyn was upset he couldn't stay, and around 7:30pm she telephoned him while she was to tell him that her second husband's son had called him. Peter Lawford also called Marilyn, inviting her to dinner, but she declined. Lawford later said her speech was slurred. As the dark and depressing evening for Marilyn wore on there were other phone calls, including one from Jose Belanos, who said he thought she sounded fine. According to the funeral directors, Marilyn died sometime between 9:30pm and 11:30pm. Her maid unable to raise her but seeing a light under her locked door, called the police shortly after midnight. She also phoned Ralph Greenson who, on arrival, could not break down the bedroom door. He eventually broke in through French windows and found Marilyn dead in bed. The coroner stated she had died from acute barbiturate poisoning, and it was a 'probable suicide'.

Timothy Dalton

At a consistently lean 6' 2", green-eyed Timothy Dalton may very well be one of the last of the dying breed of swashbuckling, classically trained Shakespearean actors who have forged simultaneous successful careers in theater, television and film. He has been comparison-shopped roundly for stepping into roles played by other actors, first following Sir Laurence Olivier in Wuthering Heights, then as "James Bond" in The Living Daylights and Licence to Kill, and even more brutally, recently, as "Rhett Butler" in Scarlett.

Undaunted and good-natured, he has always stated that he likes the risk of challenges. He was born in Colwyn Bay, North Wales, the oldest of five children of Dorothy (Scholes) and Peter Dalton-Leggett. His father was stationed in Colwyn Bay during WWII, and moved the family to Manchester in the late 1940s, where he worked in advertising and raised the growing Dalton family, in an upper-class neighbourhood outside of Belper, Derbyshire. Timothy was enrolled in a school for bright children, where he excelled in sports and was interested in the sciences. He was fascinated with acting from a young age, perhaps due to the fact that both his grandfathers were vaudevillians, but it was when he saw a performance of "Macbeth" at age 16 that his destiny was clinched.

After leaving Herbert Strutt Grammar School at the age of sixteen, he toured as a leading member of Michael Croft's National Youth Theater. Between 1964-66, he studied at The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). Just before completing his two years, he quit and joined the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, playing the lead in many productions under the direction of Peter Dews while at the same time turning professional. Dalton later said of RADA in an interview with "Seventeen" Magazine (December 1970), "It took a year to undo the psychological damage that was caused by the oppressive teachers".

His talent and classic good looks immediately landed him professional work in television, guest-starring on an episode of the short-lived TV series, Judge Dee, and as a regular on the 14-episode series Sat'day While Sunday with the young Malcolm McDowell. In late 1967 Peter O'Toole recommended him for the role of the young "King Philip of France" in The Lion in Winter (coincidentally, this was also Anthony Hopkins' big break). The following year, he starred in the Italian film The Voyeur with Marcello Mastroianni and Virna Lisi, although his voice was dubbed into Italian by another actor. Dalton also mixed in a healthy dose of BBC work during this time, including The Three Princes, _BBC Play of the Month: Five Finger Exercise (1970) (TV)_and Candida. Also during this time, he was approached and tested for the role of James Bond in On Her Majesty's Secret Service but turned it down, feeling he was too young for the part. His next film was another costume drama, Cromwell, working with director Ken Hughes, with whom he later made his first American film, Sextette. He followed Cromwell with Wuthering Heights and Mary, Queen of Scots.

He was already developing a pattern in his films that would follow him throughout his career: costume dramas where he played royalty, which he had done in three of his first four films (and ridden horses in three, and raised a sword in two). In 1972, he was contracted to play a part in Lady Caroline Lamb. However, at the last moment he was replaced. Dalton sued the company and won, but the film went on without him. From the early to mid-1970s, he decided to further hone his skills by going back into the theater full time. He signed on with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and the Prospect Theatre Company (PTC), and toured the world with both, playing the leads in "Romeo and Juliet", "King Lear", "Henry V", "Love's Labours Lost", and "Henry IV" - parts 1 and 2.

In 1975, he returned to movies in the British/Austrian production of The Executioner. It was followed in 1976 by the Spanish religious historical film about the inquisition, The Man Who Knew Love, which was never widely released. After this, he took another break from film, mixing in a healthy dose of theater, returning for his first American film, Sextette, and the lengthy miniseries Centennial, his first American television appearance, in which Lynn Redgrave played his wife. Because of his broad exposure to American audiences in this series, he began to get more frequent film and television work in the US, including the episode "Fallen Angel" of Charlie's Angels -- which, ironically, had several references to his character being like "James Bond" -- and the TV movie The Flame Is Love. Although he did a few features, including playing Vanessa Redgrave's husband in Agatha, most of his work until 1985 consisted of TV movies and miniseries. He played royalty again in the very campy Flash Gordon. He followed this with a small film, Chanel Solitaire and, in 1981, also filmed a staged production of Antony and Cleopatra opposite Lynn Redgrave, with Anthony Geary, as well as Nichelle Nichols and Walter Koenig of the original TV series, Star Trek.

The years 1983-1987 have so far been the most prolific of his career. In 1983, he starred as "Rochester" in what he considers one of his best works, the BBC's very popular Jane Eyre. Also, during this time, Roger Moore was considering leaving Bond, and Dalton was again approached, but due to his full schedule, he had to decline. In 1984, he did one of his many narrations in the Faerie Tale Theatre production of The Emperor's New Clothes. That same year also saw him in the Hallmark Hall of Fame piece The Master of Ballantrae opposite Michael York and Richard Thomas, and another miniseries, Mistral's Daughter, opposite Stefanie Powers and Stacy Keach. The next year was also a very busy one. He starred in another miniseries, Sins, playing the brother of Joan Collins, and also starred in and narrated the four-hour TV movie Florence Nightingale, opposite Jaclyn Smith. He also starred in The Doctor and the Devils as "Dr. Thomas Rock", with Stephen Rea, Jonathan Pryce, and Patrick Stewart.

In the mid-to-late 1980s, Dalton narrated many nature documentaries, most notably several episodes of the UK series Wildlife Chronicles (called "Wildlife Chronicles" in the US). In the spring of 1986, he teamed with Vanessa Redgrave for another revival of a Shakespeare production, The Taming of the Shrew and his interpretation of "Petrucchio" received uniformly high praise. Simultaneously, the world was playing a guessing game as to who would succeed Roger Moore as "James Bond". Dalton was approached but was committed to the theater, and so Pierce Brosnan was offered the part. When Brosnan was unable to get out of his Remington Steele contract at the last minute, Dalton was again approached. Able now to work it into his tight schedule, he agreed. Although his first outing as Bond, The Living Daylights, did reasonably well at the box-office, Licence to Kill suffered from a lack of marketing that appeared to harm its chances of big box-office success. However, Dalton's interpretation of "Bond" in this film received critical acclaim in some quarters as being the closest to author Ian Fleming's literary "Bond". Back in the theater, he teamed again with Vanessa Redgrave for a revival of Eugene O'Neill's seldom performed play, "A Touch of the Poet", which is considered by some to be his and Redgrave's finest professional collaboration. Although there were talks of bringing the play to Broadway, this never materialized.

Following Licence to Kill, he immediately returned to one of his strengths, costume drama, in The King's Whore. It was followed by his excellent performance in Disney's The Rocketeer, where he played a swashbuckling, Errol Flynn type. In August 1991, he teamed with Whoopi Goldberg for the first bi-racial interpretation of "Love Letters" for the final sold-out performances of the play in Los Angeles.

When he had signed on to do "Bond" it was for three pictures, but the rights to the "Bond" films became entangled in lengthy litigation, delaying production of the third. During this wait, he was set to star in the title role of another historical epic, Christopher Columbus: The Discovery. From the start, however, the film was doomed due to the competition with the Gérard Depardieu "Columbus" picture, which was racked with its own problems. When the director was replaced, Dalton backed out and was followed by his co-star, Isabella Rossellini.

In 1992, he starred in the A&E production Framed, which won a bronze medal in the 1993 New York Film Festival. The next year, he journeyed to northern Alaska and Minnesota to make a documentary on one of his favorite subjects, wolves. In the Company of Whales went on to win a silver medal in the 1994 New York Film Festival.

He kept busy in television through 1993 and 1994. He made Red Eagle, Scarlett and managed to squeeze in a guest appearance on Tales from the Crypt in the episode "Werewolf Concerto". In 1994, he took on the role of "Rhett Butler" in the eight-hour mini-series Scarlett, produced by Robert Halmi Sr. for the Hallmark Hall of Fame. In April of that year, believing he needed to move on to fresh challenges, he officially resigned the role of "James Bond", a move which was much regretted by the producers, though they understood his reasons. After two months of negotiations, the role went to Pierce Brosnan.

In September 1994, Dalton was called upon for two readings of "Peter and the Wolf" at the Hollywood Bowl. He played to full-capacity crowds. In November, Scarlett premiered and, though given only a lukewarm response by critics, it was a ratings success not only in the US but all over the world, breaking records in many European countries. As always after a major work, Dalton again withdrew quietly and without fanfare to search for his next project, a small, personal film. In the summer of 1995, he journeyed to Canada to shoot Salt Water Moose. The film was made by Canada's Norstar Entertainment and was sold to Halmi to be the first video release in his new line of Hallmark family films. It premiered on Showtime in June 1996.

During the spring of 1996, he made the IRA drama The Informant in Ireland and, in May, he traveled to Prague to shoot Passion's Way, opposite Sela Ward. On February 7, 1997, the comedy The Beautician and the Beast co-starring Fran Drescher opened in the US. He also gleefully parodied his swashbuckling/James Bond image in Looney Tunes: Back in Action as a spy playing an actor playing a spy.

In 1995, Dalton began a relationship with Oksana Grigorieva which produced a child in 1997, Dalton's son Alexander. Over the following years, Dalton has been a caring and loving father of his son. Very much a private man, Dalton's pastimes include fishing, reading, jazz, opera, antique fairs and auctions and, of course, movies.

Vivica A. Fox

Vivica A. Fox was born in South Bend, Indiana, on July 30, 1964, and is the daughter of Everlyena, a pharmaceutical technician, and William Fox, a private school administrator. She is of Native American and African-American descent and is proud of her heritage. She is a graduate of Arlington High School in Indianapolis, Indiana, and, after graduating, moved to California to attend college. Vivica went to Golden West College and graduated with an Associate Art degree in Social Sciences. While in California, she started acting professionally, first on soap operas, such as Generations, Days of Our Lives and The Young and the Restless. In another early role, she played Patti LaBelle's fashion designer daughter, "Charisse Chamberlain", on the NBC-TV series, Out All Night. Her first big break was in the film, Independence Day, along with Will Smith, and also Set It Off. She has earned critical acclaim for her portrayal of "Maxine" in the 1997 motion picture, Soul Food, which netted her MTV Movie Award and NAACP Image Award nominations. In 2000, she was casted in the medical drama, City of Angels, as "Dr. Lillian Price". She has had roles in many other movies ever since, such as: Teaching Mrs. Tingle, Two Can Play That Game and Kill Bill: Vol. 1. In 2004, Fox was in an episode of Punk'd, where her pregnant friend pretended to go into labor, but they became angry when a paramedic appeared to care more about taking pictures than delivering the baby. Vivica also took another television role, from 2004 to 2006, as she starred in the drama series, 1-800-Missing, on the Lifetime Television Network. In 2007, she was a contender on Dancing with the Stars and stayed until she was voted off in the fourth week. In 1998, Vivica A. Fox married singer Christopher Harvest (aka Sixx-Nine), whom she later divorced in June 2002. She also dated rapper 50 Cent, however this was a brief relationship.

Emily Deschanel

Emily Erin Deschanel (born October 11, 1976) is an American actress and producer. She is best known for starring in the Fox crime procedural comedy-drama series Bones as Dr. Temperance Brennan since 2005.

Deschanel was born in Los Angeles, California, to cinematographer and director Caleb Deschanel and actress Mary Jo Deschanel (née Weir). Her younger sister is actress and singer-songwriter Zooey Deschanel. Her paternal grandfather was French, from Oullins, Rhône; her ancestry also includes Swiss, Dutch, English, Irish, and other French roots.

Deschanel attended Harvard-Westlake and Crossroads School in Los Angeles before graduating from Boston University's Professional Actors Training Program with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater.

In 1994, Deschanel made her feature film debut in It Could Happen to You. Her next notable role was in Stephen King's Rose Red in 2002. Then she appeared in Cold Mountain, The Alamo, and Glory Road and was named one of "six actresses to watch" by Interview Magazine in 2004.

In 2005, Deschanel won the role of Dr. Temperance Brennan with David Boreanaz as FBI agent Seeley Booth on the Fox crime procedural comedy-drama Bones, based on the novels and the career of forensic anthropologist and author Kathy Reichs that premiered on September 13, 2005. For her performance, she received a 2006 Satellite Award nomination and a 2007 Teen Choice Award nomination. Deschanel and Boreanaz served as co-producers at the start of the show's third season, before becoming producers in the middle of the show's fourth season.

Deschanel, with Alyson Hannigan, Jaime King, Minka Kelly, and Katharine McPhee made a video slumber party featured on FunnyorDie.com to promote regular breast cancer screenings for the organization Stand Up 2 Cancer. In recent years, her passion for animal welfare has led her to providing the narration for My Child Is a Monkey and serving as an associate producer on the documentary film How I Became an Elephant. Deschanel ranked number 72 in The 2012 Hot 100 on AfterEllen.

Deschanel is a vegan and a committed supporter of animal rights causes. She can be seen in an Access Hollywood video at the book launch event of Karen Dawn's Thanking the Monkey: Rethinking the Way We Treat Animals, discussing how vegetarian and vegan diets help the environment, and a video on the homepage of the book's website talking about the importance of animal rights. She collaborated with PETA on a video encouraging mothers to raise their children as vegans. In September 2014, she joined the board of directors at Farm Sanctuary.

Deschanel was raised Roman Catholic, but is no longer practicing, and has expressed agnostic views, saying "I am more of a spiritual person, if anything, and I am of the belief that we don't know, and I'm not going to pretend that I do."

On September 25, 2010, Deschanel married It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia actor and writer David Hornsby in a small private ceremony in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles. On September 21, 2011, Deschanel gave birth to their son Henry Lamar Hornsby. On June 8, 2015, she gave birth to their second son, Calvin.

Deschanel is best friends with her Bones co-star Michaela Conlin, who plays her best friend Angela Montenegro on the show; she is also friends with her Bones co-star David Boreanaz with whom she has a strong working relationship.

Susan Sarandon

Susan Sarandon was born Susan Abigail Tomalin in New York City, New York, to Lenora Marie (Criscione) and Phillip Leslie Tomalin, a television producer and advertising executive. She is of Italian (mother) and English, Irish, Welsh, and German (father) descent. Soon after the 1968 Democratic convention, there was a casting call for a film with several roles for the kind of young people who had disrupted the convention. Two recent graduates of Catholic University in Washington DC, went to the audition in New York for Joe. Chris Sarandon, who had studied to be an actor, was passed over. His wife Susan got a major role.

That role was as Susan Compton, the daughter of ad executive Bill Compton (Dennis Patrick). In the movie Dad Bill kills Susan's drug dealer boyfriend and next befriends Joe (Peter Boyle)-- a bigot who works on an assembly line and who collects guns.

Five years later, Sarandon made the film where fans of cult classics have come to know her as "Janet", who gets entangled with transvestite "Dr. Frank 'n' Furter" in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. More than 15 years after beginning her career Sarandon at last actively campaigned for a great role, Annie in Bull Durham, flying at her own expense from Rome to Los Angeles. "It was such a wonderful script ... and did away with a lot of myths and challenged the American definition of success", she said. "When I got there, I spent some time with Kevin Costner, kissed some ass at the studio and got back on a plane". Her romance with the Bull Durham supporting actor, Tim Robbins, had produced two sons by 1992 and put Sarandon in the position of leaving her domestic paradise only to accept roles that really challenged her. The result was four Academy Award nominations in the 1990s and best actress for Dead Man Walking. Her first Academy Award nomination was for Louis Malle's Atlantic City.

Angourie Rice

From a creative family, Angourie began her career in Perth, Western Australia with several short films and national television commercials. She first came to industry attention with her work on Zak Hilditch's short film Transmission. Angourie travelled with the film to a number of festivals including the Tribeca Film Festival in New York and was awarded Best Actor at the St. Kilda Film Festival in 2012.

Following a national search, Hilditch found he could not go past Angourie for the lead role in his follow-up feature film These Final Hours which was selected for inclusion in the Directors' Fortnight at the 2014 Cannes International Film Festival. Angourie can also be seen in the role of Jade in the BBC/20th Century Fox feature film Walking With Dinosaurs 3D. Other screen credits include Mako Mermaids, the Seven Network Pilot Hartman's Solution, The Dr Blake Mysteries (ABC), The Worst Year of My Life Again (ACTF) and several short films.

Radhika Apte

Radhika Apte is an Indian film and stage actress born in Pune,Maharashtra,India. She is an Economics graduate from Fergusson College, Pune. She is associated with Mohit Takalkar's theatre troupe 'Aasakta' in her hometown. She is the daughter of Pune's leading neurosurgeons Dr Charu Apte.

She played the role of Brinda Roy Menon, a TV journalist, in 'Antaheen'. Actor Rahul Bose, who had seen her perform in Anahita Oberoi's play 'Bombay Black', suggested her name to director Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury who cast her in 'Antaheen' along with Aparna Sen, Sharmila Tagore and Rahul Bose.

She appeared in various Marathi plays like 'Tu', 'Purnaviram', 'Matra Ratra', 'Kanyadaan' and Samuel Beckett's 'That Time' with Rehan Engineer.

She appeared in 'Darmiyan', a short film in which she played a college girl Ekta. Apte appeared as Savitri, a village girl in KBC productions' Marathi film 'Gho Mala Asla Hava'. She appeared in a significant role in Ram Gopal Varma's 'Rakhtcharitra' and its sequel. She also appeared in 'Shor in the City' under Ekta Kapoor's Balaji Films banner. She was also seen in Maneej Premnath's thriller 'The Waiting Room'.Apte will also star in Akash Khurana's 'Life on Life', which is about a bunch of youngsters working in a BPO and Amol Palekar's Marathi film, 'Samaantar'.

Tom Selleck

Thomas William Selleck is an American actor and film producer, known for his starring role as Hawaii-based private investigator "Thomas Magnum" on the 1980s television series, Magnum, P.I..

Selleck was born in Detroit, Michigan, to Martha S. (Jagger), a homemaker, and Robert Dean Selleck, a real estate investor and executive. He is of mostly English descent, including recent immigrant ancestors.

Selleck has appeared extensively on television in roles such as "Dr. Richard Burke" on Friends and "A.J. Cooper" on Las Vegas. In addition to his series work, Selleck has appeared in more than fifty made-for-TV and general release movies, including Mr. Baseball, Quigley Down Under, Lassiter and, his most successful movie release, 3 Men and a Baby, which was the highest grossing movie in 1987.

Selleck also plays "Jesse Stone" in a series of made-for-TV movies, based on the Robert B. Parker novels. In 2010, he appears as "Commissioner Frank Reagan" in the drama series, Blue Bloods on CBS.

Brent Spiner

Brent Spiner, whose primary claim to fame is his portrayal of the beloved android Data on the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation, was born and raised in Houston, Texas. His parents, Sylvia (Schwartz) and Jack Spiner, owned and operated a furniture store, and were both from Jewish immigrant families (from Austria, Hungary, and Russia). Jack died of kidney failure at age 29, when Brent was 10 months old. When he was 6 years old, his mother married Sol Mintz, who adopted Brent and his older brother Ron. Although his mother divorced Mintz after 7 years of marriage, Brent retained his adopted father's last name until 1975, when he took back his birth name.

Spiner first began pursuing his interest in acting while in high school. There his inspirational drama teacher, Cecil Pickett, gave a great start to the careers of a remarkable group of aspiring young actors (and directors), including Spiner, Cindy Pickett (Cecil's daughter), Randy Quaid, Dennis Quaid, Trey Wilson, Robert Wuhl and Thomas Schlamme, all of whom later attained success in Hollywood. After graduation, Spiner followed his mentor to the University of Houston and other local colleges, while also launching his professional acting career in theater (The Houston Music Theater and other regional theater) and in film (My Sweet Charlie, which was shot on location in Texas). After a couple of false starts in New York and Hollywood, Spiner eventually established himself as a stage actor in New York, appearing in a number of off-Broadway and Broadway plays, such as "A History of the American Film" (1978), "Leave It to Beaver is Dead" (1979), "Sunday in the Park with George" (1984), and "Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" (1985). While in New York, he had a bit part in Woody Allen's Stardust Memories and starred in an independent film called Rent Control. The play "Little Shop of Horrors "brought Spiner to Los Angeles in 1984, where he eventually took up permanent residence.

In 1986, after a number of character parts in television series and movies, such as Robert Kennedy and His Times, Crime of Innocence, Manhunt for Claude Dallas, and Family Sins, Spiner snagged the role that would bring him international fame: Data, the endearing android, whom Spiner played "by tapping into his inner child." Star Trek: The Next Generation, the sequel to the original television series Star Trek, became hugely popular, moving to the big screen for four films (so far) after its 7-year run on television. Aside from these films, Spiner has made cameo appearances in a number of films directed by his friend and old schoolmate Thomas Schlamme, such as Miss Firecracker, Crazy from the Heart, and Kingfish: A Story of Huey P. Long, and has appeared in small roles in more recent films, such as Dude, Where's My Car? and The Master of Disguise. Arguably his most popular film portrayal was Dr. Brakish Okun in Independence Day, a role that elicited his unique eccentricity and sense of humor.

Michael Douglas

An actor with over forty years of experience in theatre, film, and television, Michael Douglas branched out into independent feature production in 1975 with the Academy Award-winning One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Since then, as a producer and as an actor-producer, he has shown an uncanny knack for choosing projects that reflect changing trends and public concerns. Over the years, he has been involved in such controversial and politically influential motion pictures as One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, The China Syndrome and Traffic, and such popular films as Fatal Attraction and Romancing the Stone.

Michael Douglas was born in New Brunswick, New Jersey, to actors Diana Douglas (Diana Love Dill) and Kirk Douglas (born Issur Danielovitch). His paternal grandparents were Belarusian Jewish immigrants, while his mother was born in Bermuda, the daughter of a local Attorney General, Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Melville Dill; Diana's family had long been established in both Bermuda and the United States. Douglas's parents divorced when he was six, and he went to live with his mother and her new husband. Only seeing Kirk on holidays, Michael attended Eaglebrook school in Deerfield, Massachusetts, where he was about a year younger than all of his classmates.

Douglas attended the elite preparatory Choate School and spent his summers with his father on movie sets. Although accepted at Yale, Douglas attended the University of California, Santa Barbara. Deciding he wanted to be an actor in his teenage years, Michael often asked his father about getting a "foot in the door". Kirk was strongly opposed to Michael pursuing an acting career, saying that it was an industry with many downs and few ups, and that he wanted all four of his sons to stay out of it. Michael, however, was persistent, and made his film debut in his father's film Cast a Giant Shadow.

After receiving his B.A. degree in 1968, Douglas moved to New York City to continue his dramatic training, studying at the American Place Theatre with Wynn Handman, and at the Neighborhood Playhouse, where he appeared in workshop productions of Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author (1976) and Thornton Wilder's Happy Journey (1963). A few months after he arrived in New York, Douglas got his first big break, when he was cast in the pivotal role of the free-spirited scientist who compromises his liberal views to accept a lucrative job with a high-tech chemical corporation in the CBS Playhouse production of Ellen M. Violett's drama, The Experiment, which was televised nationwide on February 25, 1969.

Douglas' convincing portrayal won him the leading role in the adaptation of John Weston's controversial novel, Hail, Hero!, which was the initial project of CBS's newly organized theatrical film production company, Cinema Center Films. Douglas starred as a well-meaning, almost saintly young pacifist determined not only to justify his beliefs to his conservative parents but also to test them under fire in the jungles of Indochina. His second feature, Adam at Six A.M. concerned a young man's search for his roots. Douglas next appeared in the film version of Ron Cowen's play Summertree, produced by 'Kirk Douglas'' Bryna Company, and then Napoleon and Samantha, a sentimental children's melodrama from the Walt Disney studio.

In between film assignments, he worked in summer stock and off-Broadway productions, among them "City Scenes", Frank Gagliano's surrealistic vignettes of contemporary life in New York, John Patrick Shanley's short-lived romance "Love is a Time of Day" and George Tabori's "Pinkville", in which he played a young innocent brutalized by his military training. He also appeared in the made-for-television thriller, "When Michael Calls", broadcast by ABC-TV on February 5, 1972 and in episodes of the popular series "Medical Center" and "The FBI".

Impressed by Douglas' performance in a segment of The F.B.I. (1965), producer 'Quinn Martin' signed the actor for the part of Karl Malden's sidekick in the police series "The Streets of San Francisco", which premiered September of 1972 and became one of ABC's highest-rated prime-time programs in the mid-1970s. Douglas earned three successive Emmy Award nominations for his performance and he directed two episodes of the series.

During the annual breaks in the shooting schedule for The Streets of _San Francisco (1972)_, Douglas devoted most of his time to his film production company, Big Stick Productions, Ltd., which produced several short subjects in the early 1970s. Long interested in producing a film version of Ken Kesey's grimly humorous novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, Douglas purchased the movie rights from his father and began looking for financial backing. After a number of major motion picture studios turned him down, Douglas formed a partnership with Saul Zaentz, a record industry executive, and the two set about recruiting the cast and crew. Douglas still had a year to go on his contract for "The Streets of San Francisco", but the producers agreed to write his character out of the story so that he could concentrate on filming "Cuckoo's Nest".

A critical and commercial success, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actor and Best Actress, and went on to gross more than $180 million at the box office. Douglas suddenly found himself in demand as an independent producer. One of the many scripts submitted to him for consideration was Mike Gray's chilling account of the attempted cover-up of an accident at a nuclear power plant. Attracted by the combination of social relevance and suspense, Douglas immediately bought the property. Deemed not commercial by most investors, Douglas teamed up with Jane Fonda and her own motion picture production company, IPC Films.

A Michael Douglas-IPC Films co-production, The China Syndrome starred Jack Lemmon, Jane Fonda, and 'Michael Douglas' and received Academy Award nominations for Lemmon and Fonda, as well as for Best Screenplay. The National Board of Review named the film one of the best films of the year.

Despite his success as a producer, Douglas resumed his acting career in the late 1970s, starring in Michael Crichton's medical thriller Coma with Genevieve Bujold, Claudia Weill's feminist comedy It's My Turn starring Jill Clayburgh, and Peter Hyams' gripping tale of modern-day vigilante justice, "The Star Chamber" (1983). Douglas also starred in Running, as a compulsive quitter who sacrifices everything to take one last shot at the Olympics, and as Zach the dictatorial director/choreographer in Richard Attenborough's screen version of the Broadway's longest running musical A Chorus Line.

Douglas' career as an actor/producer came together again in 1984 with the release of the tongue-in-cheek romantic fantasy "Romancing the Stone". Douglas had begun developing the project several years earlier, and with Kathleen Turner as Joan Wilder, the dowdy writer of gothic romances, Danny DeVito as the feisty comic foil Ralphie and Douglas as Jack Colton, the reluctant soldier of fortune, "Romancing" was a resounding hit and grossed more than $100 million at the box office. Douglas was named Producer of the Year in 1984 by the National Association of Theater Owners. Douglas, Turner and DeVito reteamed in 1985 for the successful sequel The Jewel of the Nile.

It took Douglas nearly two years to convince Columbia Pictures executives to approve the production of Starman, an unlikely tale of romance between an extraterrestrial, played by 'Jeff Bridges', and a young widow, played by Karen Allen. Starman was the sleeper hit of the 1984 Christmas season and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actor for 'Jeff Bridges'. In 1986 Douglas created a television series based on the film for ABC which starred 'Robert Hays'.

After a lengthy break from acting, Douglas returned to the screen in 1987 appearing in two of the year's biggest hits. He starred opposite Glenn Close in the phenomenally successful psychological thriller, "Fatal Attraction", which was followed by his performance as ruthless corporate raider Gordon Gekko in 'Oliver Stone''s Wall Street, earning him the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Douglas next starred in Ridley Scott's thriller Black Rain and then teamed up again with 'Kathleen Turner' and Danny DeVito in the black comedy The War of the Roses which was released in 1989.

In 1988 Douglas formed Stonebridge Entertainment, Inc. which produced Flatliners, directed by Joel Schumacher and starred Kiefer Sutherland, 'Julia Roberts', 'Kevin Bacon' and 'William Baldwin' and Radio Flyer starring Lorraine Bracco and directed by Richard Donner. Douglas followed with David Seltzer's adaptation of Susan Issac's best-selling novel, "Shining Through", opposite Melanie Griffith. In 1992 he starred with Sharon Stone in the erotic thriller from 'Paul Verhoeven' Basic Instinct, one of the year's top grossing films.

Douglas gave one of his most powerful performances opposite Robert Duvall in Joel Schumacher's controversial drama Falling Down. That year he also produced the hit comedy "Made in America" starring Whoopi Goldberg, Ted Danson and Will Smith. In 1994/95 he starred with Demi Moore in Barry Levinson's "Disclosure,." based on the best seller by Michael Crichton. In 1995 Douglas portrayed the title role in Rob Reiner's romantic comedy The American President opposite Annette Bening, and in 1997, starred in The Game directed by David Fincher and co-starring 'Sean Penn'.

Douglas formed Douglas/Reuther Productions with partner Steven Reuther in May 1994. The company, under the banner of Constellation Films, produced, The Ghost and the Darkness, starring Douglas and Val Kilmer, and John Grisham's The Rainmaker, based on John Grisham's best selling novel, directed by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Matt Damon,Claire Danes, Danny DeVito, Jon Voight, Mickey Rourke, Mary Kay Place, Virginia Madsen, Andrew Shue, 'Teresa Wright', Johnny Whitworth and 'Randy Travis'.

Michael Douglas and Steve Reuther also produced John Woo's action thriller Face/Off starring 'John Travolta' and Nicolas Cage, which proved to be one of '97's major hits.

In 1998, ' Michael Douglas' starred with Gwyneth Paltrow and Viggo Mortensen in the mystery thriller A Perfect Murder, and formed a new production company, 2000 was a milestone year for Douglas. "Wonder Boys" opened in February 2000 to much critical acclaim. Directed by Curtis Hanson and co-starring Tobey Maguire, Frances McDormand, Robert Downey Jr. and 'Katie Holmes', Douglas starred in the film as troubled college professor Grady Tripp. Michael was nominated for a Golden Globe and a BAFTA Film award for his performance.

"Traffic" was released by USA Films on December 22, 2000 in New York and Los Angeles went nationwide in January 2001. Douglas played the role of Robert Wakefield, a newly appointed drug czar confronted by the drug war both at home and abroad. Directed by Steven Soderbergh and co-starring Don Cheadle, Benicio del Toro, Amy Irving, Dennis Quaid and Catherine Zeta-Jones, "Traffic" was named Best Picture by New York Film Critics, won Best Ensemble Cast at the SAG Awards, won four Academy Awards (Best Screenplay, Best Editing, Best Director, and Best Supporting Actor for Benicio del Toro) and has been recognized over on over 175 top ten lists.

In 2001, Douglas produced and played a small role in USA Films' outrageous comedy "One Night at McCool's" starring Liv Tyler, Matt Dillon, John Goodman, Paul Reiser, and was directed by Harald Zwart. "McCool's" was the first film by Douglas' company Furthur Films. Also in 2001, Douglas starred in "Don't Say A Word" for 20th Century Fox. The psychological thriller, directed by Gary Fleder, also starred Sean Bean, Famke Janseen and Brittany Murphy.

In 2002, Douglas appeared in a guest role on the hit NBC comedy "Will & Grace", and received an Emmy Nomination for his performance.

Douglas starred in two films in 2003. MGM/BVI released the family drama "It Runs in the Family", which Douglas produced and starred with his father Kirk Douglas, his mother Diana Douglas and his son Cameron Douglas, Rory Culkin and Bernadette Peters. He also starred in the Warner Bros. comedy "The-In Laws", with Albert Brooks, Candice Bergen Ryan Reynolds.

In 2004 Douglas, along with his father Kirk, filmed the intimate HBO documentary "A Father, A Son... Once Upon a Time in Hollywood". Directed by award-winning filmmaker Lee Grant, the documentary examines the professional and personal lives of both men, and the impacts they each made on the motion picture industry.

In summer 2005, Douglas produced and starred in "The Sentinel", which was released by 20th Century Fox in spring 2006. Based on the Gerald Petievich novel and directed by Clark Johnson, "The Sentinel" is a political thriller set in the intriguing world of the Secret Service. Douglas stars with Keifer Sutherland, Eva Longoria and Kim Bassinger. Douglas filmed "You, Me & Dupree", starring with Owen Wilson, Kate Hudson and Matt Dillon. The comedy is direct by Anthony and Joe Russo, and was released by Universal Pictures during the summer of 2006. In 2007 he made "King of California", co-starring Evan Rachel Wood and is written and directed by Michael Cahill, and produced by Alexander Payne and Michael London.

Michael had two films released in early '09, "Beyond A Reasonable Doubt" directed by Peter Hyams and "Ghosts of Girlfriend's Past" starring Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Garner directed by Mark Waters. He followed with the drama "Solitary Man" directed by Brian Koppelman and David Levien, co-starring Susan Sarandon, Danny DeVito, Mary Louise-Parker, and Jenna Fischer, produced by Paul Schiff and Steven Soderbergh and in Fall '10 starred in "Wall Street 2 - Money Never Sleeps" reprising his Oscar winning role as Gordon Gekko and once again was nominated for a Golden Globe for his performance. Again directed by Oliver Stone, he co-starred with Shia Labeouf, Cary Mulligan, Josh Brolin, Frank Langella and Susan Sarandon.

Douglas had a cameo role in Steven Soderbergh's action thriller "Haywire." "Behind the Candelabra" based on the life of musical '70's/80's icon Liberace and his partner Scott Thorson, directed by Steven Soderbergh costarring Matt Damon, premiered on HBO in May 2013. Douglas won an Emmy, Golden Globe and SAG Award as Best Actor in a television movie or mini series for his performance as the famed entertainer. He followed with the buddy comedy "Last Vegas" directed by John Turtletaub co-starring Robert DeNiro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline and the romantic comedy "And So It Goes" co-starring Diane Keaton directed by Rob Reiner.

Douglas recently starred in and producing the thriller "Beyond The Reach" directed by Jean-Baptiste Leonetti costarring Jeremy Irvine and portrays Dr. Hank Pym in Marvel's "Ant Man" opposite Paul Rudd. It will be his first venture into the realm of comic book action adventure. Most recently he completed a spy thriller "Unlocked" co-starring Noomi Rapace, Orlando Bloom, John Malkovich and is directed by Michael Apted. In 1998 Douglas was made a United Nations Messenger of Peace by Kofi Annan. His main concentrations are nuclear non-proliferation and the control of small arms. He is on the Board of Ploughshares Foundation and The Nuclear Threat Initiative.

Michael Douglas was recipient of the 2009 AFI Lifetime Achievement as well as the Producers Guild Award that year. In Spring '10 he received the New York Film Society's Charlie Chaplin Award.

Douglas has hosted 11 years of "Michael Douglas and Friends" Celebrity Golf Event which has raised over $6 million for the Motion Picture and Television Fund. Douglas is very passionate about the organization, and each year he asks his fellow actors and to come out and show that "we are an industry that takes care of own".

Douglas is married to Catherine Zeta-Jones. The couple has one son, Dylan, and one daughter, Carys. Douglas also has one son, Cameron, from a previous marriage.

Marton Csokas

Marton was born in Invercargill, Aotearoa, to Margaret Christine (Rayner), a nurse, and Márton Csókás, a mechanical engineer. His father is Hungarian and his mother is Australian (of English, Irish, and Danish origin). He inherited some of his talents from his father, a trained opera singer and at one time, a trapeze artist in the Hungarian Circus.

His academic training began at Canterbury University, Christchurch, New Zealand, where he commenced a Bachelor of Arts degree, majoring in Art History, and then transferred to, Te Kura Toi Whakaari o Aotearoa/ The New Zealand Drama School, graduating in December, 1989. His first acting role was in Te Whanau a Tuanui Jones by Apairana Taylor at the Taki Rua Theatre in Wellington New Zealand, (1990). He has since had an eclectic career of theatre, television and film.

He appeared in the 1994 movie Jack Brown Genius in which he played the role of Dennis. After starring for 2 years in the New Zealand soap opera Shortland Street, he starred in the 1996 movie Broken English as Darko. After performing in a great number of theatrical plays, writing his own and co-founding his own theatre company, the Stronghold Theatre, Marton got the role of Tarlus in an episode of Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. After that, he continued working with Renaissance Pictures, playing the roles of Khrafstar and Borias in the 1997-1998 seasons of Xena: Warrior Princess. He continued appearing in many other shows in both NZ and Australia, such as Farscape, BeastMaster, Water Rats, Cleopatra 2525, and more, returning for the role of Borias in three episodes of the 2000-2001 season of Xena: Warrior Princess. He was also in many movies produced in NZ and Australia, such as Hurrah, The Monkey's Mask and the mini-series The Farm. He is a citizen of the European Union and Hungary, and is a permanent resident of the United States.

Most recently, Csokas starred opposite Denzel Washington in Sony's hit film The Equalizer. He played a brutal fixer for the Russian mafia and a formidable villain to Washington's reluctant hero.

Csokas appeared in Darren Aronofsky's Noah as well as Robert Rodriguez's Sin City: A Dame to Kill For, a sequel to the 2005 hit film Sin City. Csokas also played the psychiatrist, "Dr. Kafka," in the hit movie sequel, The Amazing Spiderman 2, alongside Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone and Jamie Foxx.

Csokas most famously starred as "Lord Celeborn" in one of the highest-grossing film series of all time, Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy. Some of his other film credits include 2010's The Debt opposite Jessica Chastain and Paul Greengrass' The Bourne Supremacy with Matt Damon. His depth of experience is illustrated in Asylum in which he starred opposite Natasha Richardson and Ian McKellen, as well as the Ridley Scott epic, Kingdom of Heaven, with Jeremy Irons, Brendan Gleeson and Liam Neeson.

On the small screen, Csokas recently starred on the History Channel's miniseries Sons of Liberty as well as Discovery Channel's miniseries Klondike with Tim Roth and Sam Shepard.

On stage, Csokas continues to work internationally, most recently starring in a production of Lillian Hellman's "Little Foxes" at The New York Theatre Workshop by acclaimed director, Ivo van Hove. The play was noted by Time Magazine as one of the "Top 10 of Everything of 2010." The actor has numerous classical credits, including 'Orsino' in Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" at the National Theatre of Great Britain, 'Anthony' in "Anthony and Cleopatra" at the Theatre of a New Audience, 'Brutus' in "Julius Caesar" and as 'Septimus' in Tom Stoppard's "Arcadia" in his birthplace of New Zealand. On the Australian stage, Csokas has appeared as 'George' in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," directed by Benedict Andrews of the Schaubuhne Theatre in Berlin and in "Riflemind," directed by Phillip Seymour Hoffman at the Sydney Theatre Company.

1-50 of 3,032 names.