1-50 of 2,724 names.

Mark Wahlberg

American actor Mark Wahlberg is one of a handful of respected entertainers who successfully made the transition from teen pop idol to respected actor. A Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee for The Departed who went on to receive positive critical reviews for his performance in The Fighter, Wahlberg also is a solid comedy actor, proven by his starring role in Ted.

He was born Mark Robert Michael Wahlberg on June 5, 1971 in a poor working class district, Dorchester, of Boston, Massachusetts. He is the son of Alma Elaine (Donnelly), a nurse's aide and clerk, and Wahlberg's father, Donald Edward Wahlberg, a delivery driver. Wahlberg is the youngest of nine children. He is of Swedish (from his paternal grandfather), Irish, French-Canadian and English descent. The large Wahlberg brood didn't have a lot growing up, especially after his parents divorced when he was eleven. The kids crammed into a three bedroom apartment, none of them having very much privacy. Mark's mother has said that after the divorce, she became very self-absorbed with her own problems. She has blamed herself for her son's subsequent problems and delinquency. Wahlberg dropped out of high school at age 14 (but later got his GED) to pursue a life of petty crime and drugs. He'd spend his days scamming and stealing, working on the odd drug deal before treating himself to the substances himself.

The young man also had a violent streak - one which was often aimed at minorities. At age 16, he was convicted of assault against two Vietnamese men after he had tried to rob them. As a result of his assault conviction, he was sentenced to serve 50 days in prison at Deer Island penitentiary. Whilst there, he began working out to pass time and, when he emerged at the end of his sentence, he had gone from being a scrawny young kid to a buff young man. Wahlberg also credits the jail time as being his motivation to improve his lifestyle and leave the crime behind him.

Around this time, his older brother Donnie Wahlberg had become an overnight teen idol as a member of the 1980s boy band New Kids on the Block. A precursor to the boy-band craze, the group was dominating the charts and were on top of their game. Mark himself had been an original member of the band but had backed out early on - uncomfortable with the squeaky clean image of the group. Donnie used his connections in the music business to help his little brother secure a recording contract, and soon the world was introduced to Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, with Wahlberg as a bad-boy rapper who danced in his boxers. Despite a lack of singing ability, promoters took to his dance moves and a physique they knew teenage girls would love.

Donnie scripted some easy songs for Mark, who collected a troupe of dancers and a DJ to become his "Funky Bunch" and "Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch" was born. His debut album, "Music for the People", was a smash hit, which was propelled along by the rapper's willingness to disrobe down to boxer-briefs on stage, not to mention several catchy tunes. Teenage girls thrilled to the rapping "bad boy". Record producer David Geffen saw in Wahlberg a cash-cow of marketing ability. After speaking to designer Calvin Klein, Marky Mark was set up as the designer's chief underwear model.

His scantily clad figure soon adorned billboards across the nation. Ironically, while the New Kids on the Block's fame was dwindling as audiences tired of their syrupy lyrics, "Marky Mark's" bad boy image was becoming even more of a commodity. He was constantly in the headlines (often of the tabloids) after multiple scandals. In 1992, he released a book dedicated to his penis. Wahlberg was constantly getting into rumored fights, most memorably with Madonna and her entourage at a Los Angeles party. While things were always intense, they were relatively harmless and made for enjoyable reading for the public. However, when the story of his arrest for assault (and the allegations of racism) broke in the press, things took on a decidedly darker note. People were not amused. Soon after, while on a British talk show along with rapper Shabba Ranks, he got into even more trouble. After Ranks made the statement that gays should be crucified, Wahlberg was accused of condoning the comments by his silence. Marky Mark was suddenly surrounded by charges of brutality, homophobia and racial hatred. His second album, "You Gotta Believe", had not been faring well and, after the charges surfaced, it plummeted from the charts.

Adding to the hoopla, Wahlberg was brought to court for allegedly assaulting a security guard. He was ordered to make amends by appearing in a series of anti-bias advertisements. Humbled and humiliated by his fall from grace in the music world, Wahlberg decided to pursue another angle, acting. He dropped the "Marky Mark" moniker and became known simply as Mark Wahlberg. His first big screen role came in Penny Marshall's Renaissance Man. Despite the name change, many people snickered at the idea of the has-been rapper thinking he could make it as an actor. From the get-go, he was proving them wrong. In Renaissance Man, he gave an utterly charming performance as a simple but sincere army recruit. What naysayers remained found it increasingly difficult to write Mark Wahlberg off as he delivered one fine performance after another. He blew them away in the controversial The Basketball Diaries and chilled them in Fear as every father's worst nightmare.

The major turning point in Wahlberg's career came with the role of troubled porn star Dirk Diggler in Paul Thomas Anderson's Boogie Nights. Since then, Wahlberg has chosen roles that demonstrate a wide range of dramatic ability, starring in critically acclaimed dramas such as Three Kings and The Perfect Storm, popcorn flicks like Planet of the Apes and Contraband, and even indies such as I Heart Huckabees.

Wahlberg was the executive producer of such television series as Boardwalk Empire, In Treatment and the highly successful comedy Entourage, which was partly based on his experiences in Hollywood.

Wahlberg and his wife Rhea Durham have four children.

Nazanin Boniadi

Nazanin Boniadi is rapidly making her mark in both film and television. Beginning in episode two, season three of the Emmy and Golden Globe award-winning drama "Homeland", she co-stars as CIA analyst Fara Sherazi. Among her many television credits, Ms. Boniadi is probably best known as Nora, a relatively longstanding love interest to Neil Patrick Harris's Barney Stinson, in seasons six and seven of "How I Met Your Mother". She also appeared in "Rochelle", a three part series for WIGS that co-starred Rosanna Arquette and was produced by Jon Avnet and Rodrigo Garcia.

On film, Ms. Boniadi appeared as Amira Ahmed in Jon Favreau's "Iron Man" and portrayed a young mother, Elaine, in Paul Haggis' "The Next Three Days". She has several independent features to her credit and will next appear as Parisa Ghaffarian in Richard Raymond's "Desert Dancer", starring Freida Pinto, Reece Ritchie and Tom Cullen.

Ms. Boniadi first garnered attention for her work as Nurse Leyla Mir on "General Hospital" for which she received a 2008 NAACP Image Award nomination for Outstanding Actress in a Daytime Drama Series.

Born in Tehran at the height of the Iranian Revolution, Ms. Boniadi's parents relocated to London shortly thereafter, where she was raised with an emphasis on education. While she was involved in theatre early in life and earned her first TV credit as a guest host on the children's show "Early Bird", Ms. Boniadi later decided she wanted to become a physician. She moved to the United States to attend the University of California Irvine where she received her Bachelor's Degree, with Honors (Dean's Academic Achievement and Service Award) in Biological Sciences, and won the "Chang Pin Chun" Undergraduate Research Award for her work in heart-transplant rejection and cancer research.

Switching gears to pursue her first love, Ms. Boniadi then decided to study acting, which included training in Contemporary Drama at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London under the supervision of dramaturge Lloyd Trott.

Ms. Boniadi is fluent in both English and Farsi. She is a dedicated human rights activist and an official spokesperson for Amnesty International USA, with a focus on women's rights and bringing attention to the unjust conviction and treatment of youth, women and prisoners of conscience in Iran.

Torrey DeVitto

Torrey Joël DeVitto has recently signed on to star in the 7th season of Lifetime's popular drama, Army Wives. Torrey was most recently seen in the CW television series, The Vampire Diaries, as "Dr. Meredith Fell", and continues to have a popular recurring role as "Melissa Hastings" on ABC Family's hit show, Pretty Little Liars. Torrey wrapped up the film, Evidence, starring Stephen Moyer, which is now being discussed as a 2013 release, depending on festival inclusion.

Born and raised in Huntington, New York, to Mary & Liberty DeVitto, from the time Torrey was born, she was surrounded by the entertainment industry. For 28 years, her father played the drums for Billy Joel. She spent most of her early years traveling on the road with her parents. By the time Torrey could walk, her heart was in the music and acting world. She began violin lessons at age six and was in the 4th grade, when she had already earned her place as the 4th chair violinist in a New York high school orchestra. From 1995 to 1997, she played in the Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra; from 1998 to 1999, she played in the Florida Youth Artist Orchestra, traveling with the orchestra to Austria; at age 12, she played a solo violin piece at the wedding of Christie Brinkley and Peter Cook; and, in 1997, Torrey played on stage, with her father, at a Terri Binion show in Orlando, earning her first standing ovation.

Torrey later studied dance with the Kings Park Dance Center in New York. She began taking acting classes at Zoe & Company in Orlando, Florida. At age 15, she started working in commercials, modeling, and print ads. Torrey's first break in acting came in 1999, when she participated in the Aaron Spelling Production, Safe Harbor. One year later, she booked the Nickelodeon pilot, Noah Knows Best. In her junior year of high school, she enrolled in the Crenshaw Performing Arts School, where she graduated 6 months early and at the top of her class. During the summer after high school graduation, Torrey stayed in Japan working for Avenue One Modeling Agency. Her break came in 2002, when she earned the lead in playwright Lee Blessing's three-woman play, "Eleemosynary", which was performed at the Orlando Shakespeare Theatre. Her performance won her rave reviews in the Orlando Sentinel.

After graduating high school, Torrey moved to Los Angeles, where her career as an actress began to take off. Her work includes: playing "Alexandra" on the MTV pilot, "Alexandra the Great" (2000); guest-starring on the FBC pilot, "One Big Happy" (2000); guest-starring in "The Untitled Michael Jacobs Pilot" for FBC; as well as guest-starring on episodes of Scrubs, Dawson's Creek, Jack & Bobby, The King of Queens, Drake & Josh, CSI: Miami and Castle. Torrey booked her first lead on the ABC Family series, Beautiful People, as aspiring model "Karen Kerr". On the film front, her film debut was in Starcrossed, and she has appeared in the 2006 movie sequel, I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer, The Rite with Anthony Hopkins, Green Flash, Killer Movie and Heber Holiday. However, above all, she is most notable for her chilling recurring role as "Carrie" on the CW drama series, One Tree Hill.

Staying true to her love of music, in 2002, she played violin with the Tommy Davidson Band at the Sunset Room in Hollywood. Her solo performance earned her another standing ovation. She also played violin on Raphael Saadiq's CD, "Ray Ray", in 2004, and, in 2011, she played on Stevie Nicks' album, "In Your Dreams".

Outside work, Torrey dedicates much of what free time she has to philanthropy. She is a Hospice Ambassador going on five years, and also supports PETA and The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).

Torrey also makes time to dote on her dog, "Beau", a 7 ½ year old Chihuahua mix that she adopted at "Much Love", a pet adoption agency in Los Angeles.

River Phoenix

River Phoenix was born River Jude Bottom in Madras, Oregon. His mother, Arlyn (Dunetz), a Bronx-born secretary, and his father, John Bottom, a carpenter, met in California in 1968. They worked as itinerant fruit pickers, and later joined the Children of God religious group (John was originally Catholic, while Arlyn was born Jewish). By the time River was two, they were living in South America, where John was the sect's Archbishop of Venezuela. In 1977, they moved to Los Angeles, and changed their last name to Phoenix. His parents encouraged all of their children to get into movies and, by age ten, River was acting professionally on TV. His film debut was in Explorers, followed rapidly by box-office successes with Stand by Me and The Mosquito Coast, and as young Indiana in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. His role as Danny Pope in Running on Empty earned him an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor. His best role was probably Mike, the hustler in My Own Private Idaho.

A dedicated animal-rights activist and environmentalist, River was a strict vegetarian and a member of PeTA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). River was a talented musician as well as an actor, and he played guitar, sang, and wrote songs for his band, Aleka's Attic, which also included his sister Rain Phoenix, while living in Gainsville, Florida. Although the band never released its own album, their song "Across the Way" can be found on PeTA's "Tame Yourself" album, used to fight animal abuse. River was in the middle of filming Dark Blood, playing the character Boy when he died. The film couldn't be finished due to too many unfilmed crucial scenes. His mother was later sued.

River died of acute multiple drug intoxication involving lethal levels of cocaine and morphine at age 23 outside the Viper Room, Johnny Depp's Los Angeles club.

Victoria Summer

Victoria has appeared as the iconic 'Julie Andrews' in Walt Disney's Saving Mr Banks (2013) opposite Tom Hanks and shortly after won a supporting role in Paramount Pictures' Transformers: Age of Extinction, directed by Michael Bay. Next up, Victoria plays the lead role of British nurse Eleanor in Out of the Burning Blue opposite Chris Klein and Werner Daehn. Born in Reading, Berkshire and raised in the small town of Wokingham, Berkshire, Victoria was involved in the arts from the young age of three, performing in pantomimes and singing in her church choir. She lived in the English countryside until she was a teenager, participating in local theatre productions, including starring as 'Nancy' in the musical Oliver, and 'Trixie' in Daisy Pulls It Off. She was also a hard worker, holding various odd jobs around town, including washing hair at the local salon and working at a gym. Every dime she made went back into perfecting her craft; paying for her singing and dancing lessons. Victoria landed a scholarship to train at the Arts Educational Schools in Chiswick, West London. She remained there for three years to obtain an honors degree in Dance and Musical Theatre. In her last year or school she landed her first official job in the arts at the prestigious Almeida Theatre in London, as the understudy of the lead role in their first ever musical: Brighton Rock [directed by Michael Attenborough]. For several years she worked in the musical theatre world in London, before deciding to pursue a film and television career in Los Angeles. When Victoria arrived in Los Angeles in 2012, she had two suitcases with all of her belongings inside, and knew one person. A self-proclaimed adventurer and workaholic, she was passionate and dedicated to pursuing her dream of being an actress. With not much money in her pocket, she found a nanny gig and started personal training on the side to make ends meet, while navigating the world of auditioning in LA. Luckily, she landed the first audition she went on, starring as 'Kristina' in the indie musical How Sweet It Isopposite Erika Christensen. Next up, her indie bookings continued appearing as 'Polina' in the sci-fi film _Higher Mission (2014)_ opposite Casper Van Dien. The film is currently in post production. After learning the ropes on a few indies, Victoria made the jump to the big leagues, quickly landing roles in Saving Mr. Banks for Disney, and Transformers: Age of Extinction for Paramount. When not working Victoria loves to do yoga, she is a vegan, and has a huge passion for rescuing animals and finding them forever homes. She is also a fan of basketball; you can often catch her at the Clippers games. Victoria currently resides in Los Angeles with her rescue animals; two cats, Missy and Elton and her Pomeranian Bentley.

Robert Carlyle

Robert Carlyle was born in Maryhill, Glasgow, Scotland, to Elizabeth, a bus company employee, and Joseph Carlyle, a painter and decorator. He was raised by his father after his mother left him when he was four. At the age of 21, after reading Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," he enrolled in acting classes at the Glasgow Arts Centre. In 1991, together with four other actors, he founded the Raindog theatre company (named after Tom Waits' album "Rain Dog," one of Carlyle's favorites), a company dedicated to innovative work.

Daryl Hannah

Over a 30 year film career, Daryl Hannah has starred in over 40 feature films, and has created numerous iconic roles in successful, critically acclaimed and enduring films.

Daryl Christine Hannah was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. She is the daughter of Susan Jeanne (Metzger), a schoolteacher and later a producer, and Donald Christian Hannah, who owned a tugboat/barge company. She has Scottish, Irish, English, and German ancestry.

Daryl graduated from the University of Southern California School of Theatre. She practiced ballet with Maria Tallchief and studied drama at Chicago's Goodman Theatre. In her twenties, she played keyboard and sang backup for Jackson Browne. Hannah, a tall (5' 10") blond beauty, with haunting blue-green eyes, was a natural for show biz.

She started with small roles, such as a student in The Fury and as Kim Basinger's kid sister in Hard Country. Daryl's breakout role was as the acrobatic, beautiful replicant punk android Pris in Blade Runner; Pris was the vixen who wanted to live beyond her allotted years and risked the wrath of the title character. Showing her versatility, from there she portrayed a mermaid, Madison, who falls in love with Tom Hanks's character in Ron Howard's zany comedy Splash, and a Cro-Magnon in The Clan of the Cave Bear. Hannah played Roxanne in the eponymous Steve Martins contemporary take on the Cyrano de Bergerac story, and co-starred as Elle Driver in Quintin Tarantino's cult classics Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and Kill Bill: Vol. 2.

Hannah has been a consistent, strong supporter of independent cinema, both acting in and producing many films, starring in such indie films as John Sayles's Casa De Los Babies as well as his political satire Silver City. She worked on several films with the revered Robert Altman, including The Gingerbread Man, as well as several films with the Polish Brother's including Northfork and Jackpot. Daryl Starred in the experimental improvised Michael Radford film Dancing at the Blue Iguana and made As a filmmaker, Hannah wrote, directed, and produced an award winning short film, entitled The Last Supper. Hannah also directed, produced and shot the documentary Strip Notes which was inspired while researching her role for Dancing At The Blue Iguana that was shown on HBO and UK's Channel 4. Daryl is in the process of shooting a documentary on Human Trafficking and has traveled undercover to South East Asia to document this atrocity and has become and advocates raising awareness and ending slavery. She has made over 40 video blogs for various websites including her popular dhlovelife.com. She designed dhlovelife.com (online since 2005) her website dedicated to sharing solutions on how to live more harmoniously with the planet and all other living things. Daryl Hannah has been passionate, committed and effective advocate for a more ethical relationship with each other and all life on the Planet. She has produced, hosted and shot numerous environmental awareness/ health documentaries, TV appearances and is a frequent speaker on both the conservative and progressive news.

Hannah has been a greening consultant for events such as the Virgin Music Festival, attended by over 150,000 people. Her many speaking engagements include keynote speeches at the UN Climate Change Summit, UN Global Business Conference on the environment,, Natural and Organic Products Expo, LOHAS and numerous national and international universities, conferences and events. She has written articles on self sufficiency and sustainability for many magazines and has done a plethora of interviews on the topic in thousands of publications. The site features weekly five-minute inspirational video blogs which Daryl produces and films. There are daily news updates, alerts, community and access to goods and services. She is a member of the World Future Council, sits on the boards of the Sylvia Earle Alliance, Mission Blue, Eco America, Environmental Media Association (EMA), The Somaly Mam Foundation, and the Action Sports Environmental Coalition, She is the founder of the Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance (SBA).

Barbra Streisand

Barbra Streisand is an American singer, actress, director and producer and one of the most successful personalities in show business. She is the only person ever to receive all of the following: Oscar, Tony, Emmy, Grammy, Golden Globe, Cable Ace, National Endowment for the Arts, and Peabody awards, as well as the American Film Institutes Lifetime Achievement honor and the Film Society of Lincoln Center Chaplin Award.

Streisand was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1942, to Diana (née Ida Rosen), a singer turned school secretary, and Emanuel Streisand, a high school teacher. Her father was of Galician Jewish descent, and her mother was of Russian Jewish ancestry. As a child, she attended the Beis Yakov Jewish School in Brooklyn. She was raised in a middle class family, and grew up dreaming to become an actress (or even an actress / conductor, as she happily describes her teenager years in one of her concerts).

After a brief period as nightclub singer in New York and Off-Broadway performer, in which she began to rise interest and admiration thanks to her original and powerful vocal talent, Streisand debuted on Broadway in the 1962 musical comedy "I Can Get It For You Wholesale" by Harold Rome, receiving a Tony Award Best Supporting Actress nomination and a New York Drama Critics Poll award. The following year, she reached great commercial success with her first Columbia solo releases "The Barbra Streisand Album"(multiple Grammy winner, including "Best Album of the Year") and "The Second Barbra Stresand Album" (her first RIAA Gold Album); her first albums, mostly devoted to composer Harold Arlen, brought her also critical praise and, most of all, large popularity in all US. In 1964 she continued to increase her fame due to a new original Broadway show, "Funny Girl" by Jule Styne and Bob Merrill, a musical based upon the life of 30's comedienne Fanny Brice; the show main song "People" became her first hit and Barbra appeared on Time magazine cover. After many TV show appearances as guest star, like "The Judy Garland Show" (for which she was nominated for an 1963 Emmy), she signed an exclusive contract with CBS for a series of annual TV special: "My Name is Barbra" (1964, Emmy winner) and "Color me Barbra" (1965, her first work in color) were extremely successful.

After a brief London stage period and the birth of her son Jason Gould (with then-husband Elliott Gould), in summer 1967 she gave a memorable free concert in New York, "A Happening in Central Park", that was filmed and later cut as a TV special; then, she flew to Hollywood for her first movie, the film version of her Broadway success "Funny Girl": the picture, directed by William Wyler, opened in 1968 and became an hit even abroad, making Barbra an international "superstar" and multiple award winner, including her first Oscar as Best Actress. After continuing screen musical experiences with Gene Kelly's "Hello Dolly" (1969) and Vincente Minnelli's "On a clear day You Can See forever" (1970), she preferred to run into comedies, like "The Owl and the Pussycat" (1970) and smash hit "What's Up Doc"(1972) and dramas, like almost surreal "Up the Sandbox" (1972) and celebrated classic "The Way We Were" (1973), by Sydney Pollack with Robert Redford, in which Streisand gave of her finest performance. The song "The Way We Were" (written by Marvin Hamlish and the Bergmans) became one of Barbra's biggest hits and most memorable and famous songs.

Returning on TV for a new special conceived as a musical journey all around many different World styles, "Barbra Streisand and other Musical Instruments" (1973), she returned (for contractual reasons) to her Fanny Brice role in "Funny Lady"(1975) and she adventured herself into her first extremely personal filming project "A Star is Born" (1976), one of the biggest hits of the year, for which she won Best Actress Golden Globe and her second Oscar for the song "Evergreen". Always extremely busy on the discography side, with a generally -at least- new album per year throughout all the 70's and 80's, she collected many high successful projects in the period, including songs as "You Don't Bring Me Flowers" (duet with Neil Diamond), "Enough is Enough" (with Donna Summer) , "The Main Event" (from a Barbra's comedy with friend Ryan O'Neal) and the album "Guilty", written for her by Bee Gee's Barry Gibb, that sold more than 10 million copies Worldwide. Streisand debuted as a director with the musical drama "Yentl" (1983), portraying a Jewish girl who has access to the world of culture disguised as a man. The movie received generally positive reviews and the beautiful score by Michel Legrand and lyricist Marilyn and Alan Bergman stands up as one of Streisand's finest musical works.

At the 1983 Oscars, the movie was presented with many nominations (winning in 2 categories) but not received a Best Directing nomination, causing great controversy and bitterness among fans: nowadays, this exclusion is still considered among the biggest "snubs" in Oscar History. After the unexpected immense success of Grammy Award winner "The Broadway Album" (1985), that contributed to introduce the world of American musical theatre (with great regard for Sondheim's) to an all new generation of audiences, Streisand gave a memorable concert, after 20 years of stage silence, simply named "One Voice" (1986), to an all star audience; she subsequently returned to the cinemas in the adaptation of "Nuts"(1987), a drama directed by Martin Ritt, in the sensitive role of a prostitute accused of murder who fights for not being considered mentally "insane" by law. In 1991, Barbra directed "The Prince of Tides", probably the pinnacle of her screen career, playing the role of a psychiatrist who tries to help a man (Nick Nolte) in finding pieces of his past life: the motion pictures received 7 Oscar Nominations (but again NOT for Best Directing) and a nomination from Director Guilds of America. In 1994 she returned on stage after 27 years for a series of all sold out concerts (for the televised version of one of these, she won another Emmy).

In the '90s, she broke several personal records: with two #1 albums ("Back to Broadway", 1993 and "Higher Ground",1997) she became the only artist to achieve n°1 album in Billboard in the 60s,70s,80s and 90's; eventually, she extended this record with a fifth decade of success in 2009 with the jazz album "Love is the Answer". In 1996, she starred in her third and last picture as director, "The Mirror Has Two Faces", along with Jeff Bridges and Lauren Bacall, one of the very few pictures with a "happy ending". "The girl got the guy" even in the real life: in 1997 Barbra married well know TV actor James Brolin. Focusing herself again in concerts in 2000 ("Timeless") and in 2006-2007 (with even a European tour), Barbra made only two more films, having a supporting role as sex therapist mother in the Ben Stiller's funny saga "Meet the Fockers" (2004) and "Little Fockers" (2010), alongside Dustin Hoffmann and Robert De Niro. She published a book devoted to her "Passion for Design" (2010) and celebrated her friendship with the Bergmans with an entire album of their songs, "What Matters Most" (2011), that debuted in the top 10.

After a long pause from active filming, she is working to a film version of the well known Jule Styne's musical "Gipsy" and returned in a starring role for the 2012 holiday season with "Guilt Trip", a mother/son picture, co-starring Seth Rogen and directed by Anne Fletcher. In almost 50 years of career, Streisand has contributed to the show business industry in an a personal and unique way, collecting a large fan-base that embraces more generations: despite the immense powerful and recognizable vocal range, most of her funny, often self deprecating, humor, side by side her serious dramatic sensible performances and strong politics, Streisand originality shines in her constant and pure research for "Beauty": a strong and romantic conception in which Love stands out as the main feeling to find in ourselves to be shared with others. That's her extremely positive and optimistic message that sounds "evergreen" nowadays more than ever. Not bad for a girl who came from Brooklyn with a "who-cares-if-I'm-not-a-beauty" look and an immense talent, whose perfection is undoubtedly the result of her imperfections.

She is good friends with singer/songwriter Neil Diamond, with whom she dueted on the smash hit song, "You Don't Bring Me Flowers". They both attended the same high school and sang together in the school choir. Barbra has one son, Jason Gould, with ex-husband Elliott Gould. She is now married to James Brolin.

Her honors include the Humanitarian Award from the Human Rights Campaign, an Honorary Doctorate in Arts and Humanities from Brandeis University in 1995, an Honorary Doctorate of Philosophy from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2013 and induction by France as a Commander of the Order of Arts and Letters.

Streisand supports many humanitarian causes through the Streisand Foundation. She has been a committed environmentalist for many years; she endowed a chair in environmental studies in 1987 and donated her twenty-four acre estate to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. In addition, Streisand was the lead funder to the Clinton Climate Change Initiative. This effort will bring together a consortium of major cities around the world to drive down greenhouse gas emissions. She is a leading spokesperson and fundraiser for social and political causes close to her heart and has often dedicated proceeds from her live concert performances to benefit programs she supports.

Pauley Perrette

Pauley Perrette is known to millions around the world as "Abby Sciuto", the brilliant but offbeat forensic scientist on CBS' NCIS, the #1-rated drama in the world. Her additional credits include appearances on such shows as Almost Famous, The Ring, 24, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Murder One, The Drew Carey Show, Jesse, Time of Your Life, Philly, Special Unit 2, Haunted and many independent films, commercials and music videos..

Born in New Orleans, Pauley was raised in Alabama, Georgia and all over the South. She was an undergrad honor student in sociology, psychology and criminal science. She began her masters degree in criminal science at Georgia State University before moving to New York City. She worked as a bartender while pursuing an acting career.

In addition to being a talented actress, Pauley is also a director, producer, published writer, poet, photographer, spoken-word artist and singer/songwriter. A passionate and dedicated advocate for civil rights, she is directing and producing a documentary about U.S. civil rights attorney and author Mark Lane. An ardent social and civil activist, Pauley is involved in many charitable organizations that work on behalf of animal rescue, civil and LGBT rights. She is on the board of Project Angel Food and supports Habitat for Humanity, NoH8, PATH (People Assisting The Homeless), EQCA (Equality California), AIDS Walk LA, The Humane Society, AIDS Task Force, NOH8 Campaign, Los Angeles Zoo, Hope Gardens, Union Rescue Mission, DonorsChoose.org, APLA (AIDS Project Los Angeles), The Amanda Foundation, the American Red Cross, Out of the Closet, Top Cops, 5p21 (AIDS clinic), Strike Out AIDS, Petfinder.com, Hollywood Homeless Lunch, Campaign for Care and Save the Children. Pauley is also an active congregant of the social and civilly active Hollywood United Methodist Church.

Her dedication to independent films has resulted in her winning, among other accolades, Best Actress in the Beverly Hills Films Festival 2010 for To Comfort You. Being placed on several IT lists, including Entertainment Weekly and LA Weekly, she also was singled out as the only woman in the top 10 of the Q rankings, and tied with Tom Hanks and Morgan Freeman at #1 as the most favorable celebrities. In the E-Poll survey, she ranked #4 most liked celebrity.

Pauley was recently honored by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul as "Community Advocate of the Year," the Union Rescue Mission with the "Heart for Service" Award, by the Desert AIDS Project as "Next Generation Advocate" and by the Union Rescue Mission with her social media efforts that saved Hope Gardens (a homeless shelter for women and children). She is finishing recording her new album with her band "Stop Making Friends", songs she wrote and sings. She is also the former lead singer of the all-girl rock band Lo-Ball. She recently collaborated with new artist B. Taylor on his single, "Fire in Your Eyes" and will soon be heard on the upcoming Run-D.M.C. single "Attention Please."

Pauley has been a frequent entertaining guest on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson, Late Show with David Letterman, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon and many other entertainment and talk shows.

Gina Carano

Gina Joy Carano was born under a tornado warning in Dallas, Texas, to parents Dana Joy (Cason) and Glenn Thomas Carano. Her father played for the Super Bowl Champion Dallas Cowboys as a backup quarterback for Roger Staubach and Danny White from 1977-1983. In 1984, he was the starting quarterback for the USFL Pittsburgh Maulers. Gina's parents divorced when she was a child, but her father remained involved in her upbringing and is her biggest fan. Gina has stated that she has a "small percentage" of Italian ancestry (her paternal grandfather was of three quarters Italian descent). Gina's other roots include English, Scottish, Dutch, German, and remote Mohawk Native American ancestry (from the 1600s). The middle child of three close-knit girls, Casey being a year older and Christie, the youngest, Gina is their self-proclaimed bodyguard and highly protective of them. All three girls were star athletes in high school. Growing up in Las Vegas, Gina, a natural born athlete and rambunctious tomboy, studied gymnastics, jazz, tap, ballet, rode horses, whooped up on her male cousins for fun at family gatherings, and wrestled and played football with the neighborhood boys. She graduated from Trinity Christian High School in Las Vegas, Nevada, where she excelled on the volleyball, softball and basketball teams, the latter she helped secure a state title. Her collegiate studies include the University of Nevada, Reno where she attended one year, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas for three where she was offered positions on both the softball and basketball teams. Her academic goal was a degree in psychology, but with only a few credits remaining she dropped everything in order to help her older sister through a crisis. At the age of 21 Gina began training in Muay Thai, a form of Kickboxing, with Master Toddy at the suggestion of then boyfriend Kevin Ross. In pursuit of a life-changing experience he ended up at a local Las Vegas Muay Thai Gym and she tagged along. A trainer approached her, telling her point blank that she was fat and needed to lose weight. She weighed around 175 lbs. and had no direction at that point in her life. She began training and became addicted. Master Toddy saw potential in the way Gina handled herself. She took naturally to fighting with strong punches, deadly elbows and knees, a impressive overhand right, and rib-cracking hard kicks. Immersing herself completely in the sport, she advanced quickly. Months later she found herself in a "fight club" situation in San Francisco where she took on any female fighter plopped down in front of her. Since then she hasn't looked back. Initially, because of her pretty face, spectators refused to take her seriously as a fighter. It is a bias that will haunt her throughout her fighting career. Gina, who is openly laughed at, insulted, and ridiculed in front of crowds before fights, realizes she will have to cowgirl up in order to silence her taunters and she lets her fists do the talking. Her Muay Thai career is comprised of an impressive 12 wins, 1 loss, and 1 draw and she becomes the first American woman to win a title in Thailand. The 2005 cult film Ring Girls follows Gina and her trainer, Master Toddy during her early Muay Thai career. Because of her beauty, spunk, and tenacity she develops a significant fan following. In June 2006, Gina's success in Muay Thai brings her to the attention of Jamie Levine of World Extreme Fighting in the world of Mixed Martial Arts. He offers her a fight against Leiticia Pestova who holds a MMA record of 11 wins and 2 losses. It is to be the first-ever sanctioned female MMA bout in the state of Nevada. Levine is impressed with Gina's statuesque size. Standing at 5'8" and 155 lbs., which is the starting weight class for men, she isn't a frail little girl and has power in her kicks comparable to a man. Still in its infancy, and because of its vicious nature, a lot of people were teetering on the fence about women fighting in MMA. Levine believed gender didn't matter and he wanted to give the two women a nationwide platform to show what they could do. Gina, under the moniker "Conviction", trains relentlessly for the history-making bout, weighing in at a muscular 135 pounds. She does not disappoint her fans, winning the fight in explosive ground-and-pound action in the 38th second of the first round. Critics begin to whine that Gina is receiving preferential treatment based on her striking good looks and that her talents as a fighter are less than stellar. She uses these criticisms as fuel for her next bout against British fighter Rosi Sexton. September 15, 2006 -- Sexton, a cerebral fighter with a mathematics degree from Cambridge and over 10 years of martial arts experience, possesses a 6-0 MMA record. Many believe Carano will go down in flames but, with six seconds left to go in the second round, Gina knocks Sexton out with a jaw dropping and show stopping overhand right. December 2006 -- She faces Elaina Maxwell. It is the second time the two have faced each other, the first time being in a Muay Thai bout. The fight goes 3 rounds and showcases Gina's powerful overhand right and improved grappling skills. She wins the unanimous decision. February 10, 2007 -- In what is billed the "Fight of the Night" and the first televised female fight on Showtime, she faces Julie Kedzie. Kedzie, who was once arrested with a group of 300 nuns at a protest, is a feisty brawler known for overpowering her opponents in the clench. She has a record of 8 wins and 4 losses. The exciting fight, an amazing stand-up brawl, goes the distance with Gina knocking Kedzie flat at the end of the second round. Kedzie, a scrappy fighter, refused to give in, taking Carano down in the third round in a submission attempt. Carano rallied, winning the unanimous decision. The appreciative crowd gave both fighters a roaring standing ovation. Julie and Gina became training partners and good friends and remain so to this day. Gina's popularity skyrockets and she is crowned "The Face of Women's MMA" a title she doesn't particularly care for since it detracts from other women in the sport. Her image is everywhere. Critics, some of them other female fighters, complain that she is using sex appeal to further her career, that she is compensating for something she is lacking in the ring, that what she is doing is disrespectful to the sport, but fans can't seem to get enough of the imposing brunette. Men fall in love with her. Little girls and women find her an inspirational combination of beauty, strength, and power. Everyone is taken in by her shy smile and laid back, good-natured personality. Gina, who believes the image of a powerful, feminine woman is something to be celebrated, is baffled by the criticisms and humbled by the attention and support from her fans. She wins her next two fights -- In September 2007 against Tonya Evinger, a wrestling champion, via rear naked choke -- Gina's first submission -- and in May 2008 against Kaitlin Young although Gina had to forfeit a little over 12% of the purse to keep the fight on the card. She failed to make EliteXC's newly created 140 lb. weight class. Most MMA organizations have the featherweight division at 145 lbs. (65.8 kg.) Coming into the fight with only a three-week training camp, Carano weighed in at 144.5 lbs. (65.5 kg.) In spite of everyone's dire predictions, she dominates and the fight is stopped at the end of the second round. Gina wins by TKO. June 2008. More criticism : A sportswriter reporting on the Carano vs. Young fight voices his suspicion that Gina's opponents must be handpicked to make sure of the outcome and that she is too pretty to fight. He finds women fighting in the MMA an unpleasant experience but concludes that she is quite the asset. 2008 -- Gina reluctantly joins the cast of American Gladiators. She has reservations about running around in itty-bitty superhero spandex, but the show's producers pursue her and finally convince her to sign on. She becomes known as "Crush" and cultivates a whole new fan base. She also appears as "Natasha", a Soviet Commando and Sniper, in the video game "Command & Conquer: Red Alert 3". MMA Legend Randy Couture, who Gina trains with, also appears. Critics are oddly silent on Couture 'going Hollywood', using his sex appeal, or being 'too pretty' to be in the video game. October 2008 -- Gina causes an unintentional frenzy at the weigh-in for the fight against Kelly Kobold. She has only fought once in the past year and there is speculation that she will not be able to make weight. Gina hired a nutritionist to help with her diet, but at the weigh-in she fails to make weight on her first two attempts. Gina, who has stated she will never pose naked for "Playboy" or any publication, boldly strips off all her clothes for the third attempt. Photographers shove and trip over each other trying to obtain the Holy Grail of photos, a bare naked Gina Carano. Severely dehydrated and towel-shielded from the cameras, she successfully makes weight at 141 pounds. Her father is one of the men holding up towels. October 5, 2008 -- With a 16-2-1 record, 6 wins by knockout and 8 by submission, Kelly Kobold vows to make Gina Carano the broken, bruised and bloodied face of MMA. Instead it is Gina who bloodies Kobold's face with a severe gash over the right eye. Gina unleashes killer kicks and knees and wins the fight. She remains undefeated and lovingly dedicates the win to her grandfather. 2009 -- She and fellow MMA athletes Kevin 'Kimbo Slice' Ferguson and Maurice Smith dabble in the Hollywood scene with small but memorable cameos in the Michael Jai White film Blood and Bone. Gina also appears on the cover of "ESPN The Magazine - The Body Issue". Posing mostly topless she shows off an impressive set of abdominals, amazing legs, and invokes more criticism. August 15, 2009 -- Gina makes history again by becoming the first female fighter to earn $100,000 for a fight. She faces Brazilian Cristiane "Cyborg" Santos in the first Women's Championship. The championship is scheduled for 5 rounds, each lasting 5 minutes -- Another first. In a hard fought battle, she loses in a heartbreaker by TKO at the bell at the end of the first round. But on January 6, 2012, revelations come to light. The California State Athletic Commission announced that Santos had tested positive for steroids after a December 2011 fight. It throws suspicion on the legitimacy of all of Cyborg's wins, including her win against Gina. Cyborg is suspended for one year, receiving a $2,500 fine. Gina, though hurt and disappointed, remains gracious and supportive of her sister fighter. A Carano vs. Cyborg rematch would be a huge MMA event but it is unlikely that Gina will ever return to the sport that made her a superstar. Classified by the Unified Women's MMA Rankings as the third best 145 lb (66 kg.) female fighter in the world, her current MMA record stands at 7 wins and 1 loss. It was after that devastating loss, black eye and all, that a deflated Gina met with Academy Award winning director Steven Soderbergh for lunch in San Diego. He had seen her fight earlier on CBS and dreamed of building a film around her. Immediately he was struck with her presence and intriguing mix of muscular power and eye-catching femininity. Inspired, he wrote the role of Mallory Kane specifically for her although she is nothing like the unsmiling, structured, alpha female character. Soderbergh assembled an impressive cast and all heaped praise on the fighter and aspiring actress. Channing Tatum, a huge fan of Gina's and the MMA, immediately signed on when he learned she was involved in the project. Ewan McGregor, having no clue who Gina Carano was, studied many of her fights on YouTube. Initially horrified by the violence of the sport, he with met with her and was taken with how quiet, gentle and thoughtful she was out of the ring. He recalls hurting his hand when he accidentally punched Gina in the head during the film's final climatic fight scene. Gina, completely unaffected by the punch and worried she had injured the actor, immediately popped to her feet and asked if he was okay. Antonio Banderas found Gina to be beautiful, natural and real and believes she has a career in front of her. Michael Fassbender, who Gina now considers a mentor, thought her extraordinary and was impressed with her work ethic. Michael Douglas, who topped out the A-list cast, heralded Gina's self-control. Gina is proud to have been a pioneer in Women's MMA, for kicking down barriers and inspiring and paving the way for the next wave of female fighters. She recently joined the 87Eleven Stunt team, the same team that propelled her to star status with their work on Haywire. With film projects like Fast & Furious 6, In the Blood and rumors of Wonder Woman flying around, Gina Carano has found her niche in the Action Heroine film market. Her newest challenge as an athlete -- To cross over into film successfully.

Alicia Silverstone

Alicia Silverstone was born on October 4, 1976 in San Francisco, California, the youngest of three children. She is the daughter of Didi (Radford), a former flight attendant, and Monty Silverstone, a real-estate investor. Her English-born father is of Ashkenazi Jewish descent, while her Scottish-born mother converted to Judaism. Alicia's career began at the tender age of six, when her father took some photos of his young daughter, which eventually led to her getting several television commercials. After a guest spot on The Wonder Years as a literal "dream girl", she moved on to movies. She landed a role in The Crush, a sort of Fatal Attraction for teenagers in which she portrayed a disturbed young girl obsessed with an older man. The nasty little role did not impress the critical establishment but it wowed its target audience: teenagers. In fact, the role won her the 1994 MTV Movie Award for "Best Villain" and "Breakthrough Performance". It is interesting to note that during the filming of the movie, Alicia became an emancipated minor in order to get around child labor laws which would have interfered with her working hours. She was a dedicated actress from early on.

The film also caught the attention of Aerosmith, who hired her to appear in a string of their music videos. The first of them, "Cryin'", was voted the #1 video of all time on MTV. Silverstone was definitely a hit with the MTV crowd, but larger commercial success still eluded her. That all changed when she landed the role of Cher in Amy Heckerling's Clueless. Cher was the antithesis of Alicia's role in The Crush; this time around, she was a rich, naive yet endearing girl from Beverly Hills in search of love in the 1990s. The film was a huge box-office hit and wowed both audiences and critics alike and demonstrated Alicia's strength and bankability. She was hailed as the woman of the hour, and branded the spokeswoman for an emerging young generation. She signed a deal with Columbia TriStar worth $10 million and got the coveted role of Batgirl in the Batman franchise. Also, as part of the package, she got a three-year first-look deal for her own production company, First Kiss Productions. The first film released by First Kiss was Excess Baggage.

Zoey Deutch

Zoey Francis Thompson Deutch was born in Los Angeles, California. She comes from a showbiz family of musicians and actors, going back two generations, as the daughter of actress Lea Thompson and director Howard Deutch), the granddaughter of music supervisor Murray Deutch, and the great-niece of actor Robert Walden. Her sister is actress Madelyn Deutch. Zoey was raised in her father's Jewish religion, and had a Bat Mitzvah ceremony.

Deutch knew acting was in the genes when she would play out scenes with her dolls, and weep for the Barbie that was down on her luck. This kind of dedication showed up a few years later, when she began landing comedic and dramatic roles in both film and television, at the ripe old age of fifteen.

Zoey was a serious dancer, as a child, excelling in ballet, competitive jazz, and tap. She was a double major in both theatre and visual arts at the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts, while simultaneously studying at the Young Actors Space, with Patrick Day.

Her first leading role was in the indie flick, Mayor Cupcake, where she played real-life mom Lea Thompson's daughter - a small town girl, with big time political aspirations. Shortly thereafter, Zoey was cast in the Disney Channel's The Suite Life on Deck series; where she played Zach's love interest "Maya", and charmed dedicated fans of the show all over the world. She guest-starred on two hit shows, Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior and NCIS, which lead to her landing the role of "Willow Turner" in the coveted Marc Cherry pilot, Hallelujah.

Though the show was not picked up, Zoey bounced back immediately after she was cast as Sarah Michelle Gellar's troubled stepdaughter, "Juliet Martin", in the CW's Ringer. The show became one of the network's biggest flops, ending after just one season, but it allowed Zoey to spread her wings in a part that required a lot of conflict and complexity from a 16-year-old. Now, she is promoting her work on the highly-anticipated movie, Beautiful Creatures, adapted from the beloved teen book series. Zoey stars alongside Viola Davis, Emma Thompson and Jeremy Irons as "Emily Asher" - a popular high schooler, who covers her hurt and humanity with her southern belle sass.

Next up, Zoey will be seen recurring on ABC Family's series, Switched at Birth. And soon, Zoey will move on to shoot her biggest project to date. She was cast as the lead in the new film franchise, based on the six-volume Richelle Mead young adult novel series, Vampire Academy: Blood Sisters. Although the movie received mostly negative reviews, the entire series was once on The New York Times best-seller young adult list back in 2007. Zoey portrayed 17-year-old "Rose Hathaway", a young woman who shares a special bond with vampire princess and best friend "Lissa" (Lucy Fry). The books are all written from Rose's perspective. Mean Girls' Mark Waters directed the film, and Heathers' Daniel Waters wrote the script.

Zoey is a big supporter of the "Corazon De Vida Orphanage" in Tijuana, and has performed for "The Alzheimer's Association", "What A Pair" and "Race to Erase" MS benefits. When she's not working, you can find her posing for Instagram photos with the love of her life: an orange Maine Coon cat named "Stinky Pete", and/or taping photo booth videos for her sister as her Ukrainian alter ego.

Rebecca Harrell Tickell

Rebecca Harrell grew up in Hinesburg, Vermont. Her adopted father, a psychiatrist, and biological mother, an artist, recognized her talent at an early age. Having performed only in school plays that her mother directed, she went to NYC in hope of getting a voice-over agent. Her first audition ever was for the Christmas movie Prancer. Raffaella De Laurentiis and 'John Hancock' showed up at her door in Vermont to tell her that she would be starring in the movie with Sam Elliot, Abe Vigoda, Cloris Leachman, and Michael Constantine. Her role garnered her a Young Artist Award nomination for "Best Young Actress Starring in a Motion Picture." Prancer was a success and is regarded as a Christmas classic. Movie critic Roger Ebert highlighted Harrell's performance, saying "what really redeems the movie, taking it out of the category of kiddie picture and giving it a heart and gumption, is the performance by a young actress named Rebecca Harrell, as Jessica. She's something. She has a troublemaker's look in her eye, and a round, pixie face that's filled with mischief. And she's smart-a plucky schemer who figures out things for herself and isn't afraid to act on her convictions". She was then cast in a series on CBS called 'Room For Romance' with Dom Irrera. Her mother moved her to NYC to go to the Professional Performing Arts School where she studied music along with Alicia Keys and child celebrities.

At eighteen she starred in A Piece of Eden along with Tyne Daly and Frederic Forrest. She guest-starred in shows such as Third Watch (1999) and Dellaventura (1997) with Danny Aiello. In 2000 at age twenty, she moved from New York to Los Angeles. She worked again with director 'John Hancock' in a suspense thriller Suspended Animation. Later that year she booked a movie alongside John Ritter which was shot in one day and was completely improvised by the actors. In Saint Sinner (2002) she played a demon that sucks souls and blood of men.

In 2007 she starred in and another horror film, Sugar Creek (2007), after which quit acting to pursue her dream of environmental activism, filmmaking and movie production. She met and fell in love with director Joshua Tickell with whom she created the Sundance Award winning environmentally themed documentary Fuel.

She is the CEO of Green Planet Productions and, with her husband Josh Tickell, has dedicated her life to environmental activism through the medium of film. Her current film The Big Fix which examines the BP Gulf Oil Spill and how America can get off of oil. Harrell currently resides in Ojai, California and was married to Tickell on New Years Day 2010. The Tickells can be seen driving the worlds first algae gasoline powered car around Los Angeles.

Richard Gere

Humanitarian and actor Richard Gere was born on August 31, 1949, in Philadelphia, the second of five children of Doris Ann (Tiffany), a homemaker, and Homer George Gere, an insurance salesman, both Mayflower descendants. Richard started early as a musician, playing a number of instruments in high school and writing music for high school productions. He graduated from North Syracuse Central High School in 1967, and won a gymnastics scholarship to the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, where he majored in philosophy. He left college after two years to pursue acting, landing a lead role in the London production of the rock musical "Grease" in 1973. The following year he would be in other plays, such as "Taming of the Shrew." Onscreen, he had a few roles, and gained recognition in Looking for Mr. Goodbar. Offscreen, he spent 1978 meeting Tibetans when he traveled to Nepal, where he spoke to many monks and lamas. Returning to the US, on Broadway he portrayed a concentration-camp prisoner in "Bent," for which he received the 1980 Theatre World Award. Back in Hollywood, he played the title role in American Gigolo, establishing himself as a major star; this status was reaffirmed by An Officer and a Gentleman. In the early 1980s, Richard went to Honduras, Nicaragua and El Salvador (amidst ongoing wars and political violence); he traveled with a doctor and visited refugee camps. It is said that he was romantically linked with lovely Brazilian painter Sylvia Martins. In 1990 Richard teamed up with Julia Roberts to star in the blockbuster Pretty Woman; his cool reserve was the perfect complement to Julia's bubbling enthusiasm. The film captured the nation's heart, and won the People's Choice award for Best Movie. Fans clamored for years for a sequel, or at least another pairing of Julia and Richard. They got that with Runaway Bride, which was a runaway success (Richard got $12 million, Julia made $17 million, the box office was $152 million, which shows what happens when you give the public what it wants!). Offscreen, Richard and Cindy Crawford got married December 12, 1991 (they were divorced in 1995). Afterwards, Richard started dating actress Carey Lowell. They had a son, Homer James Jigme Gere, on February 6, 2000. Richard was picked by People magazine as one of the 50 Most Beautiful People in the world in 1991, and as their Sexiest Man Alive in 1999. He is an accomplished pianist and music writer. Above all, Richard is a humanitarian. He's a founding member of "Tibet House," a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of Tibetan culture. He has been an active supporter of "Survival International" for several years, a worldwide organization supporting tribal peoples, affirming their right to decide their own future and helping them protect their lives, lands and human rights (these tribes are global, including the natives of the Amazon, the Maasai of East Africa, the Wichi of Argentina, and others). In 1994 Richard went to London to open Harrods' sale, donating his £50,000 appearance fee to Survival. He has been prominent in their charity advertising campaigns.

David Duchovny

David William Duchovny was born on August 7, 1960, in New York City, New York, USA. His father, Amram Duchovny, was a writer and publicist who was from a family of Jewish immigrants (from Ukraine and Poland), and worked for the American Jewish Committee. His mother, Margaret (Miller), was a Scottish-born school teacher. David has a sister, Laurie, and an older brother, Daniel Ducovny, an award-winning director of commercials, as well as a director of photography.

David earned an undergraduate degree from Princeton University, and also attended Yale University, where he undertook a Master's Degree in English Literature. A keen poet and writer, David's work was well recognized by his peers and teachers while he was in attendance at Yale. He was even nominated for a college prize by the Academy of American Poets for his outstanding work within the literary field. While at Yale, he began commuting to New York to study acting and was soon appearing in off-Broadway plays. In 1987, he abandoned his doctoral studies at Yale to pursue acting full time.

Like any actor or celebrity, David began his career on the bottom, by acting in numerous commercials in the late-eighties. He crossed over into films with bit parts in low key films such as New Year's Day and Bad Influence. Although these parts were small and somewhat insignificant, it was a start and David was able to get his foot in the door.

In 1991, David got offered the role of DEA Dennis Bryson on the acclaimed TV series, Twin Peaks. He only appeared in three episodes, but at that early stage, it was his biggest claim to fame yet, as Twin Peaks was watched by millions of people worldwide. Needless to say, David's talents as an actor would finally be recognized and he would get the acknowledgment that he so richly deserved.

In the early 1990s, he got more bit parts in films, this time, however, the films weren't "low key", but hits, such as Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead and the family favorite comedy, Beethoven. David's role in Beethoven was small, but it was hard to forget the poor guy who was dragged across the lawn by the giant St. Bernard!

A year later, in 1993, David got the lead role in the independent film Kalifornia. The film also starred another up-and-coming young actor, Brad Pitt. In Kalifornia, David played a journalist who goes on a cross-country tour of famous murder sites with his girlfriend as research for a book he is writing about serial killers. He takes Pitt's character along to help pay the bills, unaware that Pitt's character is in fact a serial killer himself. Although it did not do much business at the box office, it is still a great film and has become somewhat of a cult favorite among fans.

That same year, David was offered the role of FBI Agent Fox "Spooky" Mulder on the long-running TV series The X-Files. The show was a tremendous international success and propelled David (and his co-star Gillian Anderson) into super-stardom. His character of Mulder has become somewhat of a pop culture legend and is renowned the world over for his satirical wit and dry sense of humor. Fans loved the fact that he could keep a straight face and still crack and joke in the face of extreme danger. David improvised a lot of his own lines of dialogue while on the show and even penned and directed a few episodes. The series ended in 2002 and still has a strong, dedicated following. To date, David has reprised his role of Fox Mulder in two "X Files" feature films: The X Files and The X Files: I Want to Believe.

During the initial run of The X-Files, David kept busy and made several films, such as: Return to Me, alongside actress Minnie Driver and the comedy favorite Evolution, with Julianne Moore, Seann William Scott and Orlando Jones. He even had a hysterical cameo as a self-obsessed, simple-minded hand model in the comedy-smash Zoolander.

In 2007, after a few years out of the limelight, David struck gold again after landing the plum role of Hank Moody in Californication. The raunchy series follows the life of womanizing writer Hank Moody (Duchovny) as he tries to juggle his career and his relationship with his daughter and his ex-girlfriend. The show has become a hit for its off-the-wall humor and Duchovny's ability to always turn in a brilliant performance.

It may have taken a while, but David has worked his way to the top and notched up an impressive resume along the way. We can expect to see a lot more of him in the future.

Richard Attenborough

Lord Richard Attenborough was born in Cambridge, England, the son of Mary (née Clegg), a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council, and Frederick Levi Attenborough, a scholar and academic administrator who was a don at Emmanuel College and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law. Attenborough was educated at Wyggeston Grammar School for Boys in Leicester and at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA).

His film career began with a role as a deserting sailor in In Which We Serve, a part that contributed to his being typecast for many years as a coward in films like Dulcimer Street, Operation Disaster and his breakthrough role as a psychopathic young gangster in the film adaptation of Graham Greene's novel, Brighton Rock. During World War II, Attenborough served in the Royal Air Force.

He worked prolifically in British films for the next 30 years, and in the 1950s appeared in several successful comedies for John Boulting and Roy Boulting, including Private's Progress and I'm All Right Jack. Early in his stage career, Attenborough starred in the London West End production of Agatha Christie's "The Mousetrap", which went on to become one of the world's longest-running stage productions. Both he and his wife were among the original cast members of the production, which opened in 1952 and (as of 2007) is still running.

In the 1960s, he expanded his range of character roles in films such as Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Guns at Batasi, for which he won the BAFTA Award for Best Actor for his portrayal of the regimental Sergeant Major. He appeared in the ensemble cast of The Great Escape, as Squadron Leader "Roger Bartlett" ("Big X"), the head of the escape committee.

In 1967 and 1968, he won back-to-back Golden Globe Awards in the category of Best Supporting Actor, the first time for The Sand Pebbles, starring Steve McQueen, and the second time for Doctor Dolittle, starring Rex Harrison. He would win another Golden Globe for Best Director, for Gandhi, in 1983. Six years prior to "Gandhi", he played the ruthless "Gen. Outram" in Indian director Satyajit Ray's period piece, The Chess Players. He has never been nominated for an Academy Award in an acting category.

He took no acting roles following his appearance in Otto Preminger's The Human Factor, until his appearance as the eccentric developer "John Hammond" in Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park. The following year, he starred as "Kris Kringle" in Miracle on 34th Street, a remake of the 1947 classic. Since then, he has made occasional appearances in supporting roles, including the historical drama, Elizabeth, as "Sir William Cecil".

In the late 1950s, Attenborough formed a production company, "Beaver Films", with Bryan Forbes and began to build a profile as a producer on projects, including The League of Gentlemen, The Angry Silence and Whistle Down the Wind, also appearing in the first two of these as an actor.

His feature film directorial debut was the all-star screen version of the hit musical, Oh! What a Lovely War, and his acting appearances became more sporadic - the most notable being his portrayal of serial killer "John Christie" in 10 Rillington Place. He later directed two epic period films: Young Winston, based on the early life of Winston Churchill, and A Bridge Too Far, an all-star account of Operation Market Garden in World War II. He won the 1982 Academy Award for Directing for his historical epic, Gandhi, a project he had been attempting to get made for many years. As the film's producer, he also won the Academy Award for Best Picture. His most recent films, as director and producer, include Chaplin, starring Robert Downey Jr. as Charles Chaplin, and Shadowlands, based on the relationship between C.S. Lewis and Joy Gresham. Both films starred Anthony Hopkins, who also appeared in three other films for Attenborough: "Young Winston", "A Bridge Too Far" and the thriller, Magic.

Attenborough also directed the screen version of the hit Broadway musical, "A Chorus Line" (A Chorus Line), and the apartheid drama, Cry Freedom, based on the experiences of Donald Woods. He was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Director for both films. His most recent film as director was another biographical film, Grey Owl, starring Pierce Brosnan.

Attenborough is the President of RADA, Chairman of Capital Radio, President of BAFTA, President of the Gandhi Foundation, and President of the British National Film and Television School. He is also a vice patron of the Cinema and Television Benevolent Fund.

He is also the patron of the UWC movement (United World Colleges), whereby he continually contributes greatly to the colleges that are part of the organization. He has frequented the United World College of Southern Africa(UWCSA) Waterford Kamhlaba. His wife and he founded the "Richard and Sheila Attenborough Visual Arts Center". He also founded the "Jane Holland Creative Center for Learning" at Waterford Kamhlaba in Swaziland in memory of his daughter, who died in the Tsunami on Boxing Day, 2004. He passionately believes in education, primarily education that does not judge upon color, race, creed or religion. His attachment to Waterford is his passion for non-racial education, which were the grounds on which Waterford Kamhlaba was founded. Waterford was one of his inspirations for directing Cry Freedom, based on the life of Steve Biko.

He was elected to the post of Chancellor of the University of Sussex on 20 March 1998, replacing the Duke of Richmond and Gordon. A lifelong supporter of Chelsea Football Club, Attenborough served as a director of the club from 1969-1982 and, since 1993, has held the honorary position of Life Vice President. He is also the head of the consortium, "Dragon International", which is constructing a film and television studio complex in Llanilid, Wales, often referred to as "Valleywood".

In 1967, he was made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). He was knighted in 1976 and, in 1993, he was made a life peer as Baron Attenborough, of Richmond-upon-Thames in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.

On 13 July 2006, Attenborough and his brother, David Attenborough, were awarded the titles of Distinguished Honorary Fellows of the University of Leicester "in recognition of a record of continuing distinguished service to the University". Lord Attenborough is also listed as an Honorary Fellow of Bangor University for his continued efforts to film making.

Attenborough has been married to English actress Sheila Sim, since 1945. They had three children. In December 2004, his elder daughter, Jane Holland, as well as her daughter Lucy and her mother-in-law, also named Jane, were killed in the tsunami caused by the Indian Ocean earthquake. A memorial service was held on 8 March 2005, and Attenborough read a lesson at the national memorial service on 11 May 2005. His grandson, Samuel Holland, and granddaughter, Alice Holland, also read in the service.

Attenborough's father was principal of University College, Leicester, now the city's university. This has resulted in a long association with the university, with Lord Attenborough a patron. A commemorative plaque was placed on the floor of Richmond Parish Church. The university's "Richard Attenborough Centre for Disability and the Arts", which opened in 1997, is named in his Honor.

His son, Michael Attenborough, is also a director. He has two younger brothers, the famous naturalist Sir David Attenborough and John Attenborough, who has made a career in the motor trade.

He has collected Pablo Picasso ceramics since the 1950s. More than 100 items went on display at the New Walk Museum and Art Gallery in Leicester in 2007; the exhibition is dedicated to his family members lost in the tsunami.

Pamela Anderson

A native of Canada, Pamela Denise Anderson was born in Ladysmith, British Columbia and later moved to the city of Vancouver. It was while she was attending a British Columbia Lions football game that Anderson was "discovered" in a most unusual way. Dressed in a Labatt's Beer T-shirt, her image was transmitted on the stadium's widescreen. The fans cheered the beautiful girl, and she was brought down to the 50-yard line and introduced to the appreciative crowd. As a result, she was signed to a commercial contract with Labatt's and became the company's Blue Zone girl. The campaign was so popular that other commercials and advertising assignments for Anderson soon followed. Due to the recognition from these commercials, she was soon approached to do her first cover for Playboy Magazine. Pamela has since gone on to grace the cover again an astounding five times, more than any other woman in the magazine's history.

With the success and recognition she garnered from Playboy, Anderson soon moved to Los Angeles, California where she spent two seasons in the top-ten ABC-TV situation comedy Home Improvement, as Lisa, the Tool Time Girl. It was on "Home Improvement" that she captured the attention and affection of viewing audiences, nationwide. At the same time, Anderson was cast as C.J. Parker on the internationally successful series Baywatch, but because of the impossible scheduling requirements of working on two series, she eventually left "Home Improvement" and remained full-time on "Baywatch". She now stars on one of the most phenomenally popular television programs of all time, which is seen in 140 countries, worldwide. Recently, Anderson made the transition into the feature film arena, starring in Dark Horse Entertainment's action comedy Barb Wire. In addition, Anderson was featured in the CBS movie-of-the-week Come Die with Me: A Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer Mystery, a hip and updated Mike Hammer mystery, co-starring Rob Estes.

Pamela was married to Mötley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee, and they had two children, Brandon and Dylan. However, the couple divorced in early 1998. Both have had a rocky relationship in the past and continued to date on and off, but then headed to court over custody of their two sons. Meanwhile, she starred in and produced her television series V.I.P., which ran for four seasons until 2002. During the spring of 2001, she dated singer Kid Rock, but they broke up in the fall of 2003. Eventually, she reunited with ex-husband Tommy Lee after she found out she was diagnosed with hepatitis C, which she contracted when they shared the same needle for their tattoo. By the fall of 2003, the new network Spike-TV launched her latest action series, a cartoon, developed by Stan Lee, called Stripperella. She is an active participant in various organizations, including PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), and dedicates her time by taking part in religious practices with children from around the world.

Keith Richards

Keith Richards is an internationally recognized iconic figure in contemporary culture and popular music as a singer, guitar player, songwriter, film actor, and public figure. He was voted 10th greatest guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone Magazine, and was elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, as founding member of the legendary rock band The Rolling Stones. Together with his song-writing partner, Mick Jagger, he wrote and recorded hundreds of songs, including their monster hit 'Satisfaction', one of the defining songs of the era.

He was born Keith Richards on December 18, 1943, in Dartford, Kent, England, UK. His father, Bert Richards, a factory worker, was injured during the WWII. His mother, Doris Dupress, introduced him to music of jazz, and also encouraged his singing performances with a choir in Westminster Abbey. Keith Richards met Mick Jagger when he attended primary school during the 1950s, albeit when they went into secondary schools they lost touch for a while. But one day in 1960 they accidentally met on a train and talked about starting up a band. Eventually, Richards and Jagger made their dream come true. They established one of the most legendary life-long songwriting partnerships, following the example of John Lennon and Paul McCartney's songwriting for The Beatles. Besides their main success in popular music and entertainment, Richards and Jagger had carried on their early image of unkempt and surly youth that many others would emulate, and spread their influence across traditional boundaries of genres and styles into filmmaking, art, fashion, and contemporary lifestyle, thus turning Jagger and Richards into cross-cultural trend-setters.

Since The Rolling Stones were formed in 1962, Richards and Jagger were continuously absorbing from many musical styles and assimilated various genres and artistic influences, ultimately creating their very own inimitable style. Together they undergone transformation from semi-amateur local musicians to the leading international superstars. Both Richards and Jagger became poster boys for excess, however, they had survived ups and downs in their careers and personal lives, and remained the core of the band. Initially they shared a flat with the late Brian Jones in London, in 1962. The first lineup of the Stones consisted of Mick Jagger on lead vocal and harmonica Keith Richards on guitar, Bill Wyman on bass, Charlie Watts on drums and Brian Jones on guitar. In 1964 they released their first album titled "The Rolling Stones." In 1965 Richards and Jagger wrote their single, "The Last Time," that became their first number 1 hit in the UK. Then came "Satisfaction" (1965), which was composed by Keith Richards in his sleep, and with the addition of provocative lyrics by Mick Jagger it became the greatest hit and their calling card on each and every show.

In 1966, after The Beatles stopped giving live performances, The Rolling Stones took over as the unofficial "biggest touring band in the world" for the next few years. During 1966-1969 they toured the world, and constantly updated their song-list with many great hits like "Lets Spend the night together" (1967), "Sympathy for the Devil" (1968) and "Honky tonk woman" (1969). The incredible international success of the Stones came with a sad side, caused by Brian's drug and alcohol abuse that impaired his speech and appearance, so the band-mates had to replace him. In July 1969, Brian Jones died of drowning in his swimming pool while having signs of drug overdose. Upon Richards's and Jagger's approval, guitarist Mick Taylor took Brian's place. Brian's death at age 27 made him one of the first members of the infamous "27 Club" of rock stars who died at that age. Although Brian's estrangement from his band-mates, and his numerous arrests were caused by his personal problems with drugs, both Richards and Jagger were blamed at the time for Brian's death. The loss of one of their founding members was a painful moment for the Stones. However, at the end of the 1960s their creativity reached the new highs. Their albums "Beggars Banquet" (1968) and "Sticky Fingers" (1971) were among the most popular albums they ever made, having such hits as "Wild Horses" and "Brown Sugar."

During the 1970s The Rolling Stones remained the biggest band in the world, albeit they were rivaled by the Led Zeppelin. The Stones made thousands of live performances and multi-million record sales with hits like "Angie" (1973), "It's Only Rock and Roll" (1974), "Hot Stuff" (1976) and "Respectable" (1978). At that time both Keith Richards and Mick Jagger had individual ambitions, and applied their untamed creativity in various projects outside the Stones. Keith released his own single. In 1974 Ron Wood had replaced Mick Taylor on guitar and Keith and Ron both played lead guitars. During the decade Keith Richards had a family crisis on his hands, and suffered through emotional pain and drug abuse, albeit it didn't stop him from being himself. In 1980 the group released "Emotional Rescue" which Keith Richards didn't care for, and the group didn't even tour to promote the album. In 1981 with the release of 'Tattoo You', the group went on a major world tour filling stadiums in the US and in Europe. In 1983 the Stones recorded the album "Undercover" at the Compass Point in Nassau and during this time Mick and Keith were having arguments over rights of the group. After having created tens of albums and over a hundred popular songs together, their legendary song-writing partnership was undergoing the most painful test: the bitter rivalry between two enormously talented and equally ambitious superstars.

Outside of The Rolling Stones, Richards toured with The New Barbarians, and also was the front-man of the X-Pensive Winos in the 1980s. In 1985 Keith Richards took part in the "Artists United Against Apartheid" charity project, and has been a participant in many more charitable concerts ever since. In 1992 he released his solo album titled 'Main Offender', which got him back on the road with a promotional tour. Also during the tour he continued singing a few Stones songs. But individual career and solo performances did not bring Richards as much satisfaction as he experienced together with his writing partner. Eventually, Jagger and Richards got together in Barbados and started to write new songs for the album "Steel Wheels." After the Stones recorded it they went back on the road. It was the first tour of The Rolling Stones in 7 years. But in 1992 Bill Wyman announced that he was going to leave the group. In 1993 Keith Richards and his band released an album and toured for a few months. However, his artistic and personal connection with the Stones had eventually prevailed, and Richards reunited with his former band-mates.

In 1994 The Rolling Stones got back together again and recorded the album "Voodoo Lounge" and toured the world extensively. In 1995 an album of their warm up gig in a pub in Denmark was released. It was an acoustic live album called "Stripped". In 1997 they released the album "Bridges to Babylon" and started a new tour promoting the album. In 1998 a live album "No Security" was released. Their 1999 the tour ended and the group hasn't performed together until 2002. At that time Keith Richards continued playing guitar for various projects and artists, such as Norah Jones, and Aretha Franklin among others. Richards has been good friends with Johnny Depp, who modeled the character of Capt. Jack Sparrow after him, including his voice, his mannerisms, his personality, and aspects of his appearance. In return, Johnny Depp invited Keith Richards to play his father, Captain Teague, in the third installment of the "Pirates" franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End.

The Rolling Stones have released 55 albums of original work and compilations, and sold over 200 million records word-wide during their career spanning over 45 years. "The Stones" played in all kinds of spaces from small clubs to big stadium arenas, they remained one of the biggest entertainment acts touring the world with a retinue of jet-set hangers-on. Their inimitable shows, no matter the best, or the worst, has been played with fire and emotion, giving their audiences the kind of music they do best - it's only rock'n roll. In 2007 they even rocked the Tsar's Winter Palace with fifty thousand fans in St. Petersburg, Russia, where the communist revolution took place. They gave more large-scale shows internationally than any other existing band in the world, culminating in their 2005-2007 "A Bigger Band" tour with 147 concerts, the highest grossing tour of all time with $559 million earned. At their shows, even if you don't shake your hips like Mick Jagger, just hold on to your hat as tears go by, and they can start you up and get you rocking. You can make it if you try.

Since 1962, during the career spanning over 45 years, Keith Richards has been the lead guitarist and primary musical force behind The Rolling Stones, as well as songwriter for the band. He also continues making numerous guest performances as guitarist, as well as actor and producer active in various other projects. Besides his favorite Telecaster and Gibson guitars, Keith Richards owns a valuable collection of about one thousand vintage guitars of various brands, many of which he takes along on concert tours and studio gigs.

Since Richards wrote the signature "Satisfaction" guitar riff, that was called by Newsweek "five notes that took the world," his influence on popular music had never stopped. In his own words, Keith Richards has been dedicated to "grow this music up" beyond the theatrics of the rock's past and "keep it fresh."

Donal Logue

Donal Logue's versatility and talent makes him one of the most well respected and beloved actors today. Born in Ottawa, Canada, Logue moved all over the United States, from the Boston area as an infant to various towns on the Mexican border. He returned to Boston to attend Harvard University, where he majored in Intellectual History and discovered his love for the performing arts. While in college, he appeared in over thirty plays, worked for two summers in the American Repertory Theatre's Harvard/Radcliffe Summer Stock Company, and spent a short time doing theatre in England. After graduating, Logue joined the Cornerstone Theatre Company which developed community theatre in rural parts of the United States. From then on Logue dedicated himself to pursuing his passion for acting. In his 20 plus years in the industry, Logue has starred in films such as, The Tao of Steve, the story of a larger-than-life, philosophizing lothario, which debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, and won him a Special Jury Prize for Outstanding Performance. His other film credits include Sneakers, Gettysburg, Blade, Runaway Bride, Reindeer Games, The Million Dollar Hotel, Comic Book Villains with Michael Rapaport, Confidence, Just Like Heaven, and The Groomsmen with Ed Burns. Recently, Donal co-starred in Max Payne with Mark Wahlberg, as well as Charlie St. Cloud with Zac Ephron. He also appeared in Zodiac, directed by David Fincher, based on the Robert Graysmith books about the notorious Zodiac serial killer. Following the US release of Zodiac, he co-starred in Mark Steven Johnson's Ghost Rider with Nicolas Cage and Eva Mendes. Logue made his directorial debut with the independent film Tennis, Anyone?, which appeared at the US Comedy Arts Festival. He wrote, starred, and directed the film about two Hollywood has-beens who try and find meaning in their lives through a series of celebrity tennis tournaments. In television, Logue joined the cast of the NBC series "LIFE" about a former police officer who returns to the force after having been wrongly imprisoned for years. In 2007, he headlined the critically lauded ABC comedy "The Knights of Prosperity" in which a group of blue collar guys band together to plan a heist of Mick Jagger's New York City apartment. Prior to "The Knights of Prosperity" Logue starred in the Carsey-Warner produced show, "Grounded for Life" which aired for five seasons. He was also featured in a recurring role on "ER" as Sherry Stringfield's love interest. In 2010, Logue finished a critically acclaimed season on "Terriers," a television series created by Ted Griffin and Shawn Ryan for FX. He begins production on the Marc Cherry pilot "Hallelujah" for ABC in March of 2011. Logue lives in Los Angeles and has two children.

Christian Slater

Christian Michael Leonard Slater was born on August 18, 1969 in New York City to Michael Hawkins, a well-known soap actor, and Mary Jo Slater (née Lawton), a casting agent. Christian started in show business early, appearing on the soap opera The Edge of Night in 1976 at the age of 7. He went on to star in many Broadway shows in the early-1980s. He rose to fame in Hollywood after landing the role of Binx Davey in The Legend of Billie Jean. He moved to Los Angeles in 1987 to pursue a further acting career after dropping out of high school. After having a starring role in the cult classic Heathers, he became somewhat known as the Hollywood bad-boy, having many run-ins with the law. He is also well-known for having dated stars such as Winona Ryder, Christina Applegate, Samantha Mathis and was at one time engaged to actress/model Nina Huang. In 2000, he married Ryan Haddon, the daughter of 1970s model Dayle Haddon. The couple have two children, Jaden Christopher (b. 1999) and Eliana Sophia (b. 2001). As of early 2005, they separated and later divorced, but remain dedicated to bring up their children.

Misha Collins

Misha Collins is an American actor best known for his role as the angel Castiel on the TV series Supernatural (2005). He has had recurring roles on ER and 24, and has guest-starred on NCIS, Nip/Tuck, NYPD Blue, CSI, CSI:NY, Monk and Charmed. On the big screen, Misha is most known for his role in a film called "Karla" about a real life serial killer named Paul Bernardo, a film he has openly said he regrets making due to the nature of the real life events the film is based upon.

Misha was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He earned a BA in Social Theory from The University of Chicago, where he graduated with honors. Before turning to acting, he worked as a carpenter and woodworker in New England's Berkshire Mountains. Misha also interned at the White House during the Clinton Administration and worked at National Public Radio headquarters in DC.

Misha is a published poet with works in "The Columbia Poetry Review," "The California Quarterly" and other literary journals. A film Misha helped produce, "Loot," won "Best Documentary Feature" at the LA Film Festival in 2008 and aired on HBO.

Misha founded the 501c3 Random Acts, which has built schools, orphanages, and mobilized people all over the world to participate in good works. Misha has run several marathons and ultra-marathons. He produces a cooking show with his son, "cooking fast and fresh with west" and he runs the world's largest scavenger hunt, GISHWHES the Greatest International Scavenger Hunt The World Has Ever Seen, which has helped him break 5 Guinness World Records.

Misha has spent several months in seclusion in monasteries in Yosemite, Tibet and elsewhere. Misha is a certified lifeguard, EMT and motorcyclist who resides in Los Angeles.

Misha has and famously quirky sense of humor and an incredible talent for relating to his fans, which have earned him a dedicated twitter following. He jokingly refers to his Twitter followers as his "minions" and "flunkies," and to himself by several titles including "The Supreme Overlord," "The Babysitter," and "The Great Confuser."

Julia Ormond

The dark and classically beautiful British actress Julia Ormond was born into privileged surroundings as the daughter of a well-to-do laboratory technician. Her parents divorced when she was young; she was the second of five children. She attended Cranleigh, a private school, and showed interest in theatrics way back then. Her grandparents were artists, and she initially intended to be one herself, but after one year of art school, she renewed her dedication to acting and transferred to Webber-Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, where she graduated in 1988.

She subsequently appeared in the play "Wuthering Heights" as Catherine, where she met her Heathcliff both onstage and in real life, actor Rory Edwards. In 1989 she won the London Drama Critic's Award for her performance in "Faith, Hope and Charity" as "best newcomer." Her marriage to actor Edwards, who also appeared with her in the TV-movie Young Catherine, in which she played Catherine the Great, dissipated in 1994. In the meantime she slowly built up her reputation as a fine actress with the films The Baby of Mâcon and Captives, but Hollywood finally took notice with her lauded support role in Legends of the Fall opposite Brad Pitt. As a result of this, she was practically handed Audrey Hepburn's role in the revival of Sabrina, stealing the picture from co-star Harrison Ford.

She has since continued to glow in such international pictures as Smilla's Sense of Snow, The Barber of Siberia [The Barber of Siberia] and Resistance, and in such TV mini-series showcases as Iron Jawed Angels.

Martha Plimpton

She has show biz in her blood. Martha Plimpton was born November 16, 1970, in New York City to two actors: Keith Carradine and Shelley Plimpton. Martha began her career at age 8, when her mom had a friend of hers, composer Elizabeth Swados, enroll her in an actors' workshop. At age 10, she got a small part in Rollover, and also made a series of Calvin Klein commercials.

Her first substantial film role was as a tomboy in The River Rat; the following year, Steven Spielberg cast her in The Goonies. Martha met River Phoenix while they were both filming The Mosquito Coast, but since she was only 15 at the time, she did not go out with him. Even though she had a small part in the movie, it established her as a serious actress. Martha appeared in movies such as the screwball comedy Stars and Bars and, that same year, she was paired again with Phoenix in Running on Empty. They dated for a while and then broke up. For a while, she was engaged to actor Jon Patrick Walker.

As if making movies didn't keep her busy enough, Martha frequently worked at theaters and made her Chicago debut with the Steppenwolf Theatre Company Ensemble in "The Libertine" in 1996. As a member of that ensemble, she received a National Medal of Arts award in the autumn of 1998. As for movies, Colin Fitz Lives! and Eye of God in which she plays the starring role, have been run at the Sundance Film Festival. Although some recent movies have had low box office (Pecker $2.1 million, and 200 Cigarettes $6.8 million), Martha's performances shine and she often rises above her material.

Perhaps recalling how important acting lessons were to her as a child, she donates her time and efforts to the "52nd Street Project" which is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to matching the inner-city children with professional theater artists to create original theater, by writing, directing and performing their own plays. Perhaps one of the inner-city kids she is coaching will be the next famous actress in Hollywood.

Missy Peregrym

Born in Montréal, Québec, Missy lived most of her life in Surrey, British Columbia, with her father, a minister; her mother; and two sisters. She began her career in front of the camera at age 18 when she started modeling. The print advertisements soon turned into commercials for Mercedes Benz, Sprint Canada, and the Olympics. It wasn't long before Hollywood came calling.

Missy's first guest appearance was on the action-drama series Dark Angel opposite Jessica Alba. She followed that up with the role of Julia on the critically acclaimed cable series The Chris Isaak Show. Her next audition landed her the plum role of Tory in Black Sash. She also had starring roles on the shows Life As We Know It and Reaper. Missy starred as Haley in the 2006 gymnastics movie "Stick It." She also stars as officer Andy McNally in ABC's prime time cop show "Rookie Blue."

A dedicated soccer player, Missy's new schedule has forced her to take time away from the sport, but she picks up games whenever she can. She also enjoys snowboarding and outdoor sports on the local Vancouver mountains. She resides in Vancouver with her family.

Zoë Bell

As an established and extremely talented stunt double and actress, Zoe Bell has made a name for herself through her unparalleled dedication, skills, and focus.

Zoe Bell was born on Waiheke Island, New Zealand, to Tish, a nurse, and Andrew Bell, a doctor. She has a background in gymnastics and martial arts. She began working as a stunt woman when she doubled Lucy Lawless on the cult favorite TV series Xena: Warrior Princess. Bell also appeared as a double in the ABC thriller Alias and on an episode of Cleopatra 2525 in 2000 as a double for Vicki Pratti. In the action packed-documentary Double Dare, Bell, along with legendary stunt-woman Jeannie Epper, give an insight into the career of women who take falls and punches for a living. Double Dare also gives a glimpse into the struggles of stunt-women to stay thin, employed, and sane in a male-dominated career.

After the cancellation of Alias, Bell's next gig was working with Quentin Tarantino in Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and Kill Bill: Vol. 2, playing the stunt double for Uma Thurman's role, The Bride. Bell was nominated for her work in Kill Bill, Vol. 1 in the categories of Best Stunt by a Stunt Woman and Best Fight for the Taurus World Stunt Awards, both of which she would win the following year for Kill Bill: Vol. 2. Bell also showed off her stunt-woman skills as a double for Sharon Stone in Halle Barry's Catwoman.

Bell was injured in the final days of filming, requiring surgery, but she has since recovered and returned to work. Bell appeared along with legendary stunt woman Jeannie Epper in Amanda Micheli's acclaimed documentary Double Dare, which offers a glimpse at the lives and careers of both women, as well as the friendship they share.

Bell debuted her acting career, with her already famous stunt skills, in the double feature Grindhouse written by Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez. She was hand-picked, by Tarentino himself, to star in his segment of the double feature, Death Proof, about four women working on the movie set of their next big hit. All seems to be going well on set until a psychotic killer begins to stalk them.

Bell, a native of New Zealand, resides in Los Angeles but hopes to someday own a home in New Zealand.

Justin Baldoni

Justin Baldoni was born in Los Angeles, California, and raised in Medford, Oregon. He was a soccer and track standout in high school, as well as a radio disc jockey at a the Medford Oregon KISS FM affiliate. He was offered a place on the Division 1 Long Beach State track team his freshman year, but a hamstring injury left him unable to compete. Baldoni left Long Beach for Los Angeles where, while moving into a new apartment building, he met a manager who advised him to pursue a career in acting.

Soon after, Baldoni booked a series regular role on the WB's "Everwood" and began his television career. However in 2008 Justin ventured into his true love of directing on the side and began to build a music video and commercial career with the help of industry powerhouse "Oil Factory" in between acting appearances and in 2013 founded "Wayfarer Entertainment". A Film,Television, and digital production house focused on celebrating and elevating the human spirit through socially conscious and inspirational media.

A powerful storyteller in the commercial world, Justin has created campaigns for Sony, Emblem Health, Temple Health, Missouri Lottery, Bank of America, and Humira to name but a few. His innate ability to relate to others, which Justin credits his acting background to, lends itself to creating sincere, brand content and ads that people connect with.

In 2012, Justin partnered with SoulPancake and Emmy nominated actor Rainn Wilson to create the award winning digital series "My Last Days." The show focuses on people who are terminally ill, but choose to live out their final months being an inspiration to others. To date, the show has over 20 million viewers and raised over 1M for various charitable foundations.

In 2013, Justin shot his first feature-length documentary about a young man, Shane Burcaw, with SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy). The film will donate a percentage of proceeds to an organization dedicated to finding a cure for the illness.

G. Hannelius

Hannelius is an actress, singer, and budding fashionista. She can be seen starring on The Disney Channel's hit original series, Dog with a Blog. The show premiered in October 2012, and was watched by 4.5 million viewers. In February 2013, it was picked up for a second season.

Born in Boston, Massachusetts and raised in Maine, Hannelius always had a love for entertaining, even at a very young age. She got her start in acting by participating in local theatre productions, landing the starring role as "Madeline", when she was eight-years-old in "Madeline's Rescue" and "Jenny" in "Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing". Realizing their daughter's love for performing, Hannelius' mom and dad made the decision to come out to Los Angeles for pilot season in what may have been the worst time in history to try and break into the entertainment business; during the 2008 Writers Guild of America strike. Upon arrival, despite the current conditions of the industry, Hannelius started to book projects, immediately. Her first real job, was a commercial for the "Aquarium of the Pacific". Soon after the commercial launched, she booked a series regular role on the Bob Saget series, Surviving Suburbia, for ABC, filming 13 episodes in 2009.

Although "Surviving Suburbia" only lasted one season, 2009 would prove to be a very busy year for Hannelius. After the series wrapped, she was discovered by a Disney Channel executive who caught Hannelius on the "Aquarium of the Pacific" commercial, and sought her out for several projects in production over at Disney. Throughout the rest of 2009 to 2012, she landed roles on Disney Channel hit series, including Sonny with a Chance, Hannah Montana, I'm in the Band and Good Luck Charlie, in addition to her role in the Disney Channel original movie, Den Brother and Disney Channel's Leo Little's Big Show. She also has lent her voice to several films over the last few years, working on Disney's Treasure Buddies and Spooky Buddies as the fun-loving golden retriever, "Rosebud", and The Search for Santa Paws and Santa Paws 2: The Santa Pups, also Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment.

In her free time, Hannelius enjoys playing the piano, singing, poetry, fencing, horseback riding, ballet, juggling and acrobatics. She is also an active supporter of "A Window Between Worlds", a nonprofit organization dedicated to using art to help end domestic violence. She has been supporting the organization for four years.

Sadie Calvano

Sadie began performing in musical theatre when she was seven. Favorite past roles include Alice in "Alice In Wonderland" (2008) at the El Portal, Belle in "Beauty And The Beast" (2008) at The Barnsdall Theatre, Sharpay in "High School Musical" (2009) and Tallulah in "Bugsy Malone" (2011) both at the Madrid Theatre and Christina in Crown City Theatre's four week run of "A Chicago Christmas Carol" (2010). Her professional career began with a guest star appearance on Chris Elliot's Eagleheart in the summer of 2010, followed by a co-star role on NCIS as William Devane's kidnapped granddaughter for which she received a YAA best actress nomination. Sadie made her big screen debut as Leonardo DiCaprio's niece in the Clint Eastwood bio-epic "J. Edgar." Other credits include a couple of pilots, guest star appearances on "Kickin' It" and "Crash & Bernstein" and a recurring role on "Melissa & Joey." Sadie still spends her summers at Stagedoor Manor, the acclaimed New York theatre intensive whose alumni include Jon Cryer, Natalie Portman, and Shawn Levy. Sadie is also the National Spokesperson for Bags4Kids, an organization that provides comfort items and support for distressed foster children. Sadie is dedicated to developing her craft and also to her academic education. Sadie also studies ballet, jazz, voice, and was formerly a competitive gymnast, taking home the gold medal in floor in July 2009 at the 2010 California State Games in San Diego. Sadie is most well known for her role as Violet,Anna Faris' teenage daughter in the new Chuck Lorre comedy, "Mom" (2013)on CBS. Sadie lives Los Angeles, California with her mother, father, Piper, her cat and her adorable dog, Benji. Calvano is represented by Paradigm and Silver Linings Entertainment.

Lori Singer

Dancer, cellist, actress -- it's not just "Virtual Reality". Lori Jacqueline Singer was born on November 6, 1957 in Corpus Christi, Texas. Her father Jacques Singer was a symphony conductor, and her mother Leslie a concert pianist. Lori grew up in Texas, Portland, Vancouver and London. Lori always wanted to become a dancer. At age 12, she fell in love with cello music and wanted to study that, too. Lori was a prodigy, because at age 14, she got accepted to the Juilliard Performing Arts School in New York, where she majored in music. Lori became the school's youngest undergraduate student, and only one year after enrolling, she made her debut as a soloist with the Western Washington Symphony. In 1980, Lori won the Bergen Philharmonic Competition. In 1981, Lori married Richard Emery (they would divorce in 1998). This lovely lady (5' 10") also pursued a successful modeling career with the Elite Model Agency.

Inspired by her brother Marc Singer's success in Hollywood, Lori had started taking acting lessons at age 17, and in 1982, she landed a role in the television series Fame. She was a natural to play the tall, beautiful cellist Julie Miller, displaying her dancing and singing skills. Lori portrayed a model in the television movie Born Beautiful, and won a Silver Halo Award for her performance. Lori went on to do movies, her breakout film being Footloose which grossed $80,000,000 (and Lori had beat out Madonna for the part). In 1985, Lori was nominated for the Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead in Trouble in Mind. Lori had a son, Jacques Rio, in 1991. In 1993, Lori won a Golden Globe Award for her outstanding performance in Short Cuts. In 1995, Lori starred in VR.5 the short-lived sci-fi series. That same year, she was also listed in People magazine as one of the "Most Beautiful People".

Lori still plays the cello regularly, and although she was classically trained, Lori plays rock music as well (sometimes she gathers her friends in her apartment for a jam). Big-hearted Lori also devotes a lot of time and effort to the "DISHES Project" for Pediatric AIDS. (DISHES -- Determined Involved Super-role models Helping to End Suffering) Their mission "is to raise funds and awareness for programs dedicated to direct care, prevention and education, foster care and adoptive services." Lori is one of many generous celebrities (including Cindy Crawford, Heidi Klum, Elle Macpherson, Claudia Schiffer, and many others) who have donated their time, image and money for this noble project. Lori lives with her son in Manhattan. And, as Lori writes occasionally when she signs an autograph: "Stay Footloose!"

Christy Carlson Romano

At 6 years old Christy was cast in several national tours of Broadway musicals, including Annie, The Will Rogers Follies, and The Sound of Music. At 12, she made her feature film debut in Woody Allen's Everyone Says I Love You. She continued acting in independent films with famed directors Hal Hartley in Henry Fool and Martin Davidson in Looking for an Echo. Before heading West, Romano made her Broadway debut in the Tony Award-winning musical Parade by Alfred Uhry and Jason Robert Brown originating the role of Mary Phagan.

On February 17, 2004, Romano began a 31-week run of playing Belle in Disney's Beauty and the Beast on Broadway. She left the production after raising ticket attendance from 30% to 99%. Romano later returned to Broadway and starred in Avenue Q, in which she puppet-mastered 'Kate Monster' and 'Lucy the Slut' and was directed by Pitch Perfect's Jason Moore. She continued being involved in the theater community with an off-Broadway production of White's Lies along-side Betty Buckley, and most recently originated starring roles in musical workshops such as 'Scary Musical' and Martin Charnin's (Annie) 'Robin Hood: The Final Adventure'.

Romano became the first person to act in three Disney Channel projects simultaneously. Supplementing her on-camera work on Even Stevens, where she co-starred with Shia LaBeouf, she voiced the title animated character in Kim Possible. Romano's voice was nominated for a Daytime Emmy and the show inspired an adventure ride at Disney's Epcot, as well as two Disney Channel movies. She was the voice of Yuffie Kisaragi in the English version of Final Fantasy VII Advent Children, as well as in the Disney/Square game Kingdom Hearts and has continued success as a voice actor on shows like Family Guy and The Penguins of Madagascar and films like Casper's Scare School and The Legends of Secret Pass. She has recently done scratch vocal work for Mila Kunis in To Hell and Back and is the voice of two Marvel characters in a highly anticipated video game.

Christy's voice can be heard on the recording soundtracks of Everyone Says I Love You, Parade, Kim Possible: A Stitch in Time, Disney's Teachers Pet, and Disney's Princess Diaries 2. Her first album was been released by Disney Records and is titled Christy Carlson Romano Greatest Movie & TV Hits. She was signed to Atlantic records and toured with Raven Symone and Hilary Duff.

She can also be heard on many AUDIBLE.COM audio books such as: The Mara Dyer Trilogy, Cuckoo's Child, Bat Six, Connie B. Jones, My Heartbeat, Pop Princess and her own book Grace's Turn (available via iTunes). She is also the voice of Disney's Scene it: Deluxe Edition.

She hosted two seasons of the Disney Hour for the Children's Miracle Network, Wired Teen for Tek T.V., and the 50th Anniversary of Disney Parks. She was the hosting ambassador, perfume and clothing designer for Club Libby Lu.

Romano has a long relationship with Disney ABC Television Group by starring in movies for the Disney Channel: Cadet Kelly, The Even Stevens Movie, and ABC Family: Campus Confidential, Taking Five, The Cutting Edge 2: Going for the Gold, and The Cutting Edge 3: Chasing the Dream. Various other TV appearances include MTV's Kaya, NBC'S Joan of Arcadia, CW's Summerland, and TNT's HawthoRNe.

Romano penned a novel, Grace's Turn, published by Hyperion, which received accolades by The New York Public Library as the 2007 Teenage Book of the Year. She is currently developing a new young adult novel.

Romano's recently completed 5 feature films - Loosies (IFC), Mirrors II (20th Cent. FOX), Infected (Universal), romantic family comedy Lucky Dog, and female thriller Where Fate Meets due out in 2015. She's set to begin filming a black and white comedy in August before finishing her BA at Columbia University with a double major in Film and Women's Leadership.

Romano has further branched off in the industry and to date, has produced/directed two short films, and a music video, which has amassed almost 2 million views on YouTube and was selected in the 2012 Los Angeles Shorts Film Festival. Her production company is in post-production for a dramatic feature, Prism, that stars Christian Madsen of 'Divergent'.

At the GI Film Festival in Los Angeles in 2012, Christy received the 'GI Spirit Award' due to her work as a leading member of the Ambassadors of Hollywood Support Tour in Afghanistan and was offered a board member position. She has since traveled to the Capitol and presented Senator Chris Dodd (MPAA) and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (CT) as well as performed the National Anthem for the GIFF's veteran filmmakers. She was awarded the key to the city of her hometown in Connecticut and been given a day (Feb 22) commemorating her contribution as a role model with the 'CT's Finest Award' at the state Capitol.

Christy has participated for many years, performing in fund-raising benefits for Equity Fights Aids, The Actors Fund, Leukemia Foundation, American Heart Association and Unicef. She dedicated the proceeds of her "Ready for Action" Mickey Statue to the Children's Miracle Network auctioned at Sotheby's, she has fulfilled several wishes for the Make a Wish Foundation, has done PSA's for the Child's Safety Network on the Internet and has sat on the board of the young Hollywood committee at St. Jude's Hospital. Christy was also named the campaign spokesperson for The American Counseling Association to speak out against bullying. She consulted the AVIVA Center in Los Angeles and is a current volunteer at the The Actor's Fund 'Looking Ahead' program for youth in entertainment.

Romano recently spoke at Old Dominion University and is available for speaking engagements nationally. She is a participant of the National Association of Campus Activities.

Anne Bancroft

Anne Bancroft was born on September 17, 1931 in the Bronx, New York, the daughter of Italian-American parents Michael Italiano (1906-2001), a dress pattern maker, and Mildred DiNapoli (1908-2010), a telephone operator. She made her cinema debut in Don't Bother to Knock in 1952 and over the next five years appeared in a lot of undistinguished movies as a supporting actress (like, for example, Gorilla at Large and The Girl in Black Stockings). By 1957, she had grown dissatisfied with the state of her career, left Hollywood and spent the next five years on Broadway. She returned to the screen in 1962 with her portrayal of Annie Sullivan in The Miracle Worker, for which she won an Oscar. Bancroft went on to give acclaimed performances in The Pumpkin Eater, The Slender Thread, Young Winston, The Prisoner of Second Avenue, The Elephant Man, To Be or Not to Be, 84 Charing Cross Road and other movies, but her most famous role would be as Mrs. Robinson in The Graduate. Her status as the "older woman" in the film is iconic, although in real life Bancroft was just 36 and less than six years older than co-star Dustin Hoffman, who played a character seduced by a woman more than twice his age. Bancroft would later express her frustration over the fact that the film overshadowed her other work. Though usually a very selective actress, Bancroft increased her output in the 1990s with character roles in such films as Love Potion No. 9, Point of No Return, Home for the Holidays, G.I. Jane, Great Expectations and Keeping the Faith. She also started to make some TV films, including Deep in My Heart, for which she won an Emmy. Sadly, on June 6, 2005, Bancroft passed away at the age of 73 from uterine cancer. Her death surprised many, as she had not revealed any information of her illness to the public. Among her survivors was her husband of forty years (Mel Brooks), and her only child (Max Brooks) who was born in 1972. Her final film, the animated feature Delgo, was released posthumously in 2008 and dedicated to her memory.

Adriana Lima

Adriana Francesca Lima was born on June 12, 1981 in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. At the tender age of 13, Adriana entered the Ford Supermodel of the World Contest, where her unique beauty, derived from her Native-Brazilian, African-Brazilian, Portuguese, French, and Caribbean heritage, won her second place. Moving to New York at age 16, Adriana joined the Elite Model Management and further pursued her modeling career, landing a campaign for the fashion designer Anna Molinari's clothing line. However, it was her appearance in several Guess? campaigns that gained her the recognition that catapulted her to her status as one of the world's top fashion models. Since then, she has appeared in campaigns for Anna Sui Jeans, Bebe, Gasoline, Mossimo, Victoria's Secret, BCBG, Keds, and XOXO, and has appeared on the covers of magazines such as Vogue and Marie Claire. She consistently appears in the hyped Victoria's Secret Fashion Shows, gaining recognition as one of the Victoria's Secret's Perfect 10. In her spare time, Adriana dedicates her services to help orphans in her native Brazil. She has appeared in the Italian TIM mobile Commercials.

Julie Christie

Julie Christie, the British movie legend whom Al Pacino called "the most poetic of all actresses", was born in Chukua, Assam, India, on April 14, 1941, the daughter of a tea planter, Frank St. John Christie, and his wife, Rosemary (Ramsden), who was a painter. Her family was of English, and some Scottish, origin. The young Christie grew up on her father's tea plantation before being sent to England for her education. Finishing her studies in Paris, where she had moved to improve her French with an eye to possibly becoming a linguist (she is fluent in French and Italian), the teenager became enamored of the freedom of the Continent. She also was smitten by the bohemian life of artists and planned on becoming an artist before she enrolled in London's Central School of Speech Training. She made her debut as a professional in 1957 as a member of the Frinton Repertory of Essex.

Christie was not fond of the stage, even though it allowed her to travel, including a professional gig in the United States. Her true métier as an actress was film, and she made her screen debut in the science-fiction television serial A for Andromeda in 1961. Her first film role was as the unlikely wife of Leslie Phillips' in the Ealing-like comedy Crooks Anonymous, which was followed up by an ingénue role in another comedy, The Fast Lady. The producers of the "James Bond" series were sufficiently intrigued by the young actress to consider her for the role that subsequently went to Ursula Andress in Dr. No, but dropped the idea because she was not busty enough.

Christie first worked with the man who would kick her career into high gear, director John Schlesinger, when he choose her as a replacement for the actress originally cast in Billy Liar (1963). Christie's turn in the film as the free-wheeling "Liz" was a stunner, and she had her first taste of becoming a symbol if not icon of the new British cinema. Her screen presence was such that the great John Ford cast her as the Irish prostitute, Daisy Battles, in Young Cassidy (1965). Charlton Heston wanted her for his film The War Lord, but the studio refused her salary demands.

Although Amercan magazines portrayed Christie as a "newcomer" when she made her breakthrough to super-stardom in Schlesinger's seminal Swinging Sixties film Darling, she actually had considerable work under her professional belt and was in the process of a artistic quickening. Schlesinger called on Christie, whom he adored, to play the role of mode "Diana Scott" when the casting of Shirley MacLaine fell through. (MacLaine was the sister of the man who would become Christie's long-time paramour in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Warren Beatty, whom some, like actor Rod Steiger, believe she gave up her career for. Her Doctor Zhivago co-star, Steiger -- a keen student of acting -- regretted that Christie did not give more of herself to her craft).

As played by Christie, Diana is an amoral social butterfly who undergoes a metamorphosis from immature sex kitten to jaded socialite. For her complex performance, Christie won raves, including the Best Actress Awards from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the British Film Academy. She had arrived, especially as she had followed up Darling with the role of "Lara" in two-time Academy Award-winning director David Lean's adaptation of Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago, one of the all-time box-office champs.

Christie was now a superstar who commanded a price of $400,000 per picture, a fact ruefully noted in Charlton Heston's diary (his studio had balked at paying her then-fee of $35,000). More interested in film as an art form than in consolidating her movie stardom, Christie followed up Doctor Zhivago with a dual role in Fahrenheit 451 for director François Truffaut, a director she admired. The film was hurt by the director's lack of English and by friction between Truffaut and Christie's male co-star Oskar Werner, who had replaced the more-appropriate-for-the-role Terence Stamp. Stamp and Christie had been lovers before she had become famous, and he was unsure he could act with her, due to his own ego problems. On his part, Werner resented the attention the smitten Truffaut gave Christie.

Stamp overcame those ego problems to sign on as her co-star in John Schlesinger's adaptation of Thomas Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, which also featured two great English actors, Peter Finch and Alan Bates. It is a film that is far better remembered now than when it was received in 1967. The film and her performance as the Hardy heroine "Bathsheba Everdene" was lambasted by film critics, many of whom faulted Christie for being too "mod" and thus untrue to one of Hardy's classic tales of fate. Some said that her contemporary, Vanessa Redgrave, would have been a better choice as "Bathsheba", but while it is true that Redgrave is a very fine actress, she lacked the sex appeal and star quality of Christie, which makes the story of three men in love with one woman more plausible, as a film.

Although no one then knew it, the period 1967-68 represented the high-water mark of Christie's career. Fatefully, like the Hardy heroine she had portrayed, she had met the man who transformed her life, undermining her pretensions to a career as a movie star in their seven-year-long love affair, the American actor Warren Beatty. Living his life was always far more important than being a star for Beatty, who viewed the movie star profession as a "treadmill leading to more treadmills" and who was wealthy enough after Bonnie and Clyde to not have to ever work again. Christie and Beatty had visited a working farm during the production of Far from the Madding Crowd and had been appalled by the industrial exploitation of the animals. Thereafter, animal rights became a very important subject to Christie. They were kindred souls who remain friends four decades after their affair ended in 1974.

Christie's last box-office hit in which she was the top-liner was Petulia for Richard Lester, a film that featured one of co-star George C. Scott's greatest performances, perfectly counter-balanced by Christie's portrayal of an "arch-kook" who was emblematic of the '60s. It is one of the major films of the decade, an underrated masterpiece. Despite the presence of the great George C. Scott and the excellent Shirley Knight, the film would not work without Julie Christie. There is frankly no other actress who could have filled the role, bringing that unique presence and the threat of danger that crackled around Christie's electric aura. At this point of her career, she was poised for greatness as a star, greatness as an actress.

And she walked away.

After meeting Beatty, Julie Christie essentially surrendered any aspirations to screen stardom, or at maintaining herself as a top-drawer working actress (success at the box office being a guarantee of the best parts, even in art films). She turned down They Shoot Horses, Don't They? and Anne of the Thousand Days, two parts that garnered Oscar nominations for the second choices, Jane Fonda and Geneviève Bujold. After shooting In Search of Gregory, a critical and box office flop, to fulfill her contractual obligations, she spent her time with Beatty in California, renting a beach house at Malibu. She did return to form in Joseph Losey's The Go-Between (1970), a fine picture with a script by the great Harold Pinter, and she won another Oscar nomination as the whore-house proprietor in Robert Altman's minor classic McCabe & Mrs. Miller that she made with her lover Beatty. However, like Beatty, himself, she did not seek steady work, which can be professional suicide for an actor who wants to maintain a standing in the first rank of movie stars.

At the same time, Julie Christie turned down the role of the Russian Empress in Nicholas and Alexandra, another film that won the second-choice (Janet Suzman) a Best Actress Oscar nomination. Two years later, she appeared in his landmark mystery-horror film Don't Look Now, but that likely was as a favor to the director, Nicolas Roeg, who had been her cinematographer on Fahrenheit 451, Far from the Madding Crowd and Petulia. In the mid-70s, her affair with Beatty came to an end, but the two remained close friends and worked together in Shampoo (which she regretted due to its depiction of women) and Heaven Can Wait.

Christie was still enough of a star, due to sheer magnetism rather than her own pull at the box-office, to be offered $1 million to play the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis character in The Greek Tycoon (a part eventually played by Jacqueline Bisset to no great acclaim). She signed for but was forced to drop out of the lead in Agatha (which was filled by Vanessa Redgrave) after she broke a wrist roller-skating (a particularly southern Californian fate!). She then signed for the female lead in American Gigolo when Richard Gere was originally attached to the picture, but dropped out when John Travolta muscled his way into the lead after making twin box-office killings as disco king "Tony Manero" in Saturday Night Fever and greaser "Danny Zuko" in Grease. Christie could never have co-starred with such a camp figure of dubious talent. When Travolta himself dropped out and Gere was subbed back in, it was too late for Christe to reconsider, as the part already had been filled by model-actress Lauren Hutton.

Finally, the end of the American phase of her movie career was realized when Christie turned down the part of "Louise Bryant" in Reds, a part written by Warren Beatty with her in mind, as she felt an American should play the role. (Beatty's latest lover, Diane Keaton, played the part and won a Best Actress Oscar nomination). Still, she remained a part of the film, Beatty's long-gestated labor of love, as it is dedicated to "Jules".

Julie Christie moved back to the UK and become the UK's answer to Jane Fonda, campaigning for various social and political causes, including animal rights and nuclear disarmament. The parts she did take were primarily driven by her social consciousness, such as appearing in Sally Potter's first feature-length film, The Gold Diggers which was not a remake of the old Avery Hopwood's old warhorse but a feminist parable made entirely by women who all shared the same pay scale. Roles in The Return of the Soldier with Alan Bates and Glenda Jackson and Merchant-Ivory's Heat and Dust seemed to herald a return to form, but Christie -- as befits such a symbol of the freedom and lack of conformity of the '60s -- decided to do it her way. She did not go "careering", even though her unique talent and beauty was still very much in demand by filmmakers.

At this point, Christie's movie career went into eclipse. Once again, she was particularly choosy about her work, so much so that many came to see her, essentially, as retired. A career renaissance came in the mid-1990s with her turn as "Gertrude" in Kenneth Branagh's ambitious if not wholly successful Hamlet. As Christie said at the time, she didn't feel she could turn Branagh down as he was a national treasure. But the best was yet to come: her turn as the faded movie star married to handyman Nick Nolte and romanced by a younger man in Afterglow, which brought her rave notices. She received her third Best Actress Oscar nomination for her performance, and showed up at the awards as radiant and uniquely beautiful as ever. Ever the iconoclast, she was visibly relieved, upon the announcement of the award, to learn that she had lost!

Christie lived with left-wing investigative journalist Duncan Campbell (a Manchester Guardian columnist) since 1979, first in Wales, then in Ojai, California, and now in London's East End, before marrying in 2008. In addition to her film work, she has narrated many books-on-tape. In 1995, she made a triumphant return to the stage in a London revival of Harold Pinter's "Old Times", which garnered her superb reviews. In the decade since Afterglow, she has worked steadily on film in supporting roles.

Christie -- an actress who eschewed vulgar stardom -- proved to be an inspiration to her co-star Sarah Polley who was in No Such Thing and The Secret Life of Words. Polley says that Christie is uniquely aware of her commodification by the movie industry and the mass media during the 1960s. Not wanting to be reduced to a product, she had rebelled and had assumed control of her life and career. Her attitude makes her one of Polley's heroes, who calls her one of her surrogate mothers. (Polley lost her own mother when she was 11 years old).

Polley wrote the screenplay for her adaptation of Alice Munro's short story "The Bear Went Over the Mountain" with only one actress in mind: Julie Christie. Polley had first read the short story on a flight back from Iceland, where she had made No Such Thing with Christie and, as she read, it was Julie whom she pictured as "Fiona", the wife of a one-time philandering husband, who has become afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and seeks to save her hubby the pain of looking after her by checking herself into a home. After finishing the screenplay, it took months to get Christie to commit to making the film. Polley then found out why Christie is so reticent about making movies: "She gives all of herself to what she does. Once she said yes, she was more committed than anybody".

According to David Germain, a cinema journalist who interviewed Christie for the Associated Press, "Polley and Christie share a desire to do interesting, unusual work, which generally means staying away from Hollywood. The collaboration between the two rebels yielded a small gem of a film. Lions Gate Films was so impressed, it purchased the American distribution rights to the film in 2006, then withheld it until the following year to build up momentum for the awards season. Julie Christie's performance in Away from Her is superb, and already has garnered her the National Board of Review's Best Actress Award.

Holland Roden

No stranger to primetime television with roles on hit shows such as Lost, Weeds and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, up and coming actress Holland Roden can be seen in her starring role as "Lydia Martin" in MTV Network's most successful scripted series, Teen Wolf. As a lead role, Holland plays the role of the popular girl Lydia Martin, whom the actress says is a mix of Tracy Flick's IQ (Election) meets Violet Beauregarde's spunk (Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory).

Born and raised in Dallas, Texas, Holland was drawn to the arts at an early age. Fascinated by the "Queen of England" at only six years old, Holland would put on one-woman plays for her family, emulating her favorite royal. Holland took her love of performing one step further and enrolled in theatre camps as well as acting classes to further her passion. However, it was Holland's second love, science that brought her out to Los Angeles and jump-started her career.

Holland enrolled at UCLA as a molecular biology major and after one year of school, realized she wanted to return to her passion in acting. Within two months of hiring an agent, Holland got her first big break, a recurring role on HBO's 12 Miles of Bad Road. Holland learned the highs and lows of this business early on, experiencing how such a promising show could be cancelled before it premiered. However, she persevered and went on to book guest starring appearances on shows such as: The Event, Cold Case, Community, and Criminal Minds, as well as a lead in the cult classic franchise: Bring It On: Fight to the Finish. During her hiatus from "Teen Wolf," Holland recently took time out to shoot a guest star episode on ABC's Grey's Anatomy, and a leading role in an independent horror flick titled House of Dust currently in post-production.

Even though Holland has been fulfilling her dream as an actor, she still remained dedicated to her education as a full-time student. However, due to Holland's busy work schedule, she was forced to make the hard decision of switching majors, leaving her love for science behind and majoring in women studies; a field Holland found surprisingly fascinating and received her degree in from UCLA.

In contrast to her professional and academic life, Holland's free time consists of exploring the world of music. Whether it's coming across new indie artists or listening to her all time favorites including Ingrid Michaelson, Josh Rouse, Cat Stevens, Mumford & Sons, and Crash Kings, Holland is a music fan through and through.

Jessy Schram

Jessy Schram has been a natural performer since early childhood. At the age of 10, her "intangible star quality" was recognized by the Stewart Talent Agency in Chicago, which signed her as both an actress and fashion model. She immediately established herself as one of Chicago's most successful child models by booking numerous commercials, print campaigns, voice-overs, and television work.

Jessy's success in the entertainment industry continues to grow. After moving to LA at the age of 18, Jessy quickly began to fill a long list of credits for film and TV. She has been a recurring role on nationally televised shows such as Veronica Mars, "Jane Doe", Life, Crash and Medium, where shes taken on the role of the young Patricia Arquette; as well as been featured on House M.D., CSI: Miami, Without a Trace, Boston Legal, Hawthorne and more. Jessy also starred in Universal's feature film American Pie Presents The Naked Mile as well as played a supporting role in independent films such as I Want Someone to Eat Cheese With and Keith. Most recently, Jessy has completed a new pilot for TNT and Dreamworks as well as a role in Tony Scott's feature film Unstoppable.

In addition to acting, Jessy discovered her groove for music as a singer/song-writing solo artist, as well as touring with Joan Baby's soul band, performing at places like The Knitting Factory, Hard Rock Cafe, Tweeter Center, Soldier Field, Navy Pier, Hancock Music Center, and many more. In addition to performing, Jessy has spent time fine-tuning her talents with various producers, songwriters, musicians, vocal coaches and choreographers. Over the years, she has had the privilege to collaborate with Jim Peterik of The Ides of March and Survivor, and Suave of Hip Hop Connxion. In addition to her singing and song-writing skills, Jessy continues to learn guitar and explore percussion developing her own unique style. Growing from pop/rock, R&B, to finding a voice in styles that meet the likes of Marc Broussard and K.T. Tunstall.

Jessy's passion and dedication has helped fulfill her dreams and goals. Not only is she a role model for other aspiring performers, but Jessy is actively involved in working with different charities. She is committed in heart and frequently visits orphaned children in Baja, Mexico through a group called Corazon De Vida. As well as visiting Project Angel Food in Los Angeles and her church's local soup kitchen when time allows.

Jessy's success in the entertainment industry continues to grow at a rapid pace. Her ability to touch others through the roles she plays brings a freshness and truth that men and women alike adore. She has been "incredibly blessed" and plans to grow in her talents and share all that's been given.

Michael Madsen

Michael Madsen's long career spans 25 years and more than 170 films in which he has played memorable characters in myriad box office hits, including: Kill Bill, Sin City, Hell Ride, Die Another Day, Donnie Brasco, Species, The Getaway, The Doors, Thelma & Louise, and Free Willy. Michael Madsen is notably recognized for his role as Mr. Blonde, in Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs.

Michael was born in Chicago, Illinois, to 'Elaine Madsen' (née Melson), an Emmy-winning writer, producer, and poet, and Calvin Madsen, a firefighter. He is the brother of actress Virginia Madsen. His paternal grandparents were Danish.

In recent years, Madsen has received Best Actor awards for his role in the Irish boxing film Strength and Honour, from the New York International Film Festival, the Boston Film Festival and the Downtown Los Angeles Film Festival. Madsen received the Golden Dolphin Award at the 25th Festroia Festival in Portugal, an award also given to veterans Kirk Douglas and Robert Mitchum. In 2012, Madsen was named President of the first annual Champs Elysees Film Festival in France which honored producer Harvey Weinstein. Recent television appearances include guest starring roles on "The Mob Doctor", "Golden Boy" and "Blue Bloods" and most recently on Hawaii Five-0's episode titled "The Sins of the Fathers".

In 2014, Madsen is on location in Las Vegas starring in the feature film "Silver City" in the role of famed Casino owner Ted Binion with Josh Evans directing, Robert Evans producing. He is also at work on a documentary film about "The Western" with Robert Redford. Quentin Tarantino has tapped him for a role in his next feature titled "The Hateful Eight " which begins production later this year.

Madsen is well recognized as an accomplished poet. His first book "Burning In Paradise" with a Foreword by Dennis Hopper, won the Independent Firecracker Award and was later translated into Norwegian. He has a world-wide following with his work, honored at International Poetry Festivals in Genoa , Italy and Mexico . He was recently the Guest of Honor at the Crossing Border Festival in The Netherlands. His "The Complete Poetic Works" is an international bestseller. This was followed by his "Signs of Life" dedicated to Chris Penn. This unique work combined his new poetry with his own original photography. His next book of poetry "American Badass"was dedicated to the memory of the late David Carradine, his friend and Kill Bill co-star. His newest book "Expecting Rain" has a Foreword by Jerry Hopkins.

Monica Raymund

Monica Raymund stars as Gabriella Dawson in NBC's drama "Chicago Fire."

A graduate of The Juilliard School, she is the recipient of the John Houseman Award for her commitment and dedication. Immediately following her graduation, she went on to star opposite Tim Roth for three seasons in "Lie to Me." During this time, she also became a founding member of The Mechanical Theatre Group, has been on faculty and co-head of the Communications Department at The Heifetz Institute and served as faculty for The Broadway Theatre Project. Raymund currently serves on the board and faculty of the Performing Arts Project, is a board member for The Hollywood Arts Organization in Los Angeles, is executive producing the independent feature "Submarine Kid", she was a producer on the Broadway production of "The Velocity of Autumn" and is the Founder/President of the theatrical production company, SISU Theatrical Productions, LLC.

Other credits include, a lead role in director Stephen Elliott's latest feature "Happy Baby", a supporting role in the feature "Arbitrage" opposite Richard Gere, a starring role in the Sundance Lab musical production of "Like Water for Chocolate," and a recurring role on "The Good Wife." She also guest starred on the 200th episode of "Law & Order: SVU" opposite Robin Williams.

Monica won The Imagen Award this past year for leading actress in a drama.

Monica separated from her husband early 2013 and they completed their divorce in 2014.

Raymund resides in New York City.

Max Martini

Born Maximilian Carlo Martini in Woodstock, New York, Martini is a citizen of not only the United States, but also of Canada and Italy. His parents were involved in the arts and instilled in him an appreciation for all things creative. After moving around a bit as a child, he made his way back to New York City and began to study acting. Starting out at the Neighborhood Playhouse he did the majority of his training with 'Michael Howard' in Manhattan. He then took a break from acting to focus on his early love of fine art, attending the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan and receiving a BFA in painting and sculpture. After completing college, Martini began to work steadily in both film and television projects. His film roles were sharing the screen with Tom Hanks and Matt Damon in Saving Private Ryan as "Cpl Fred Henderson", Ryan's commanding officer who helped "Captain Miller" (Hanks) and his men in the brutal final shootout of the film; & also had roles in some smaller independent films, working with Calista Flockhart in Pictures of Baby Jane Doe, Chris Penn and Jeffrey Wright in Cement and in the 2000 Sundance Film Festival favorite, Backroads. He also took on a lead role in the Steven Spielberg Emmy-nominated 20 hour mini-series Taken and has a recurring role with Kiefer Sutherland as "Agent Steve Goodrich" on Fox's Emmy-nominated 2nd season of 24. Other television work includes series regular roles on John Sacret Young's Level 9, Chris Carter's Harsh Realm and recurring roles on Breaking News, and the award-winning Canadian series, Da Vinci's Inquest. He has also co-starred in several TV movies including Morgan Freeman's Mutiny and Francis Ford Coppola's Another Day. He also made many memorable guest-star turns on popular series.

Martini is active in the theatre, having co-founded "Theatre North Collaborative" in New York City, a theatre company of American and Canadian actors dedicated solely to producing new works from both sides of the border. Max has recently been filming CBS's The Unit, created by David Mamet and produced by Shawn Ryan of The Shield.

He has also written a film, Desert Son, which he co-directed with his younger brother, Christopher Martini and was costume-designed by his sister Michelle Martini. Martini, his wife Kim Restell and their two boys spend their time between their home in Los Angeles and their horse ranch out of town.

Danny Glover

Actor, producer and humanitarian Danny Glover has been a commanding presence on screen, stage and television for more than 25 years.

Glover was born in San Francisco, California, to Carrie (Hunley) and James Glover, postal workers who were also active in civil rights.

Glover trained at the Black Actors' Workshop of the American Conservatory Theater. It was his Broadway debut in Fugard's Master Harold...and the Boys, which brought him to national recognition and led director Robert Benton to cast Glover in his first leading role in 1984's Oscar®-nominated Best Picture Places in the Heart. The following year, Glover starred in two more Best Picture nominees: Peter Weir's Witness and Steven Spielberg's The Color Purple. In 1987, Glover partnered with Mel Gibson in the first Lethal Weapon film and went on to star in three hugely successful Lethal Weapon sequels. Glover has also invested his talents in more personal projects, including the award-winning To Sleep With Anger, which he executive produced and for which he won an Independent Spirit Award for Best Actor; Bopha!; Manderlay; Missing in America; and the film version of Athol Fugard's play Boesman and Lena. On the small screen, Glover won an Image Award and a Cable ACE Award and earned an Emmy nomination for his performance in the title role of the HBO movie Mandela. He has also received Emmy nominations for his work in the acclaimed miniseries Lonesome Dove and the telefilm Freedom Song. As a director, he earned a Daytime Emmy nomination for Showtime's Just a Dream.

Glover's film credits range from the blockbuster Lethal Weapon franchise to smaller independent features, some of which Glover also produced. He co-starred in the critically acclaimed feature Dreamgirls directed by Bill Condon and in Po' Boy's Game for director Clement Virgo. He appeared in the hit feature Shooter for director Antoine Fuqua, Honeydripper for director John Sayles, and Be Kind, Rewind for director Michel Gondry.

Glover has also gained respect for his wide-reaching community activism and philanthropic efforts, with a particular emphasis on advocacy for economic justice, and access to health care and education programs in the United States and Africa. For these efforts, Glover received a 2006 DGA Honor. Internationally, Glover has served as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Program from 1998-2004, focusing on issues of poverty, disease, and economic development in Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and serves as UNICEF Ambassador.

In 2005, Glover co-founded Louverture Films dedicated to the development and production of films of historical relevance, social purpose, commercial value and artistic integrity. The New York based company has a slate of progressive features and documentaries including Trouble the Water, which won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival, Africa Unite, award winning feature Bamako, and most recent projects Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives, and The Disappearance of McKinley Nolan.

Bruce Lee

Bruce Lee remains the greatest icon of martial arts cinema and a key figure of modern popular media. Had it not been for Bruce Lee and his movies in the early 1970s, it's arguable whether or not the martial arts film genre would have ever penetrated and influenced mainstream North American and European cinema and audiences the way it has over the past four decades.

The influence of East Asian martial arts cinema can be seen today in so many other film genres including comedies, action, drama, science fiction, horror and animation.....and they all have their roots in the phenomenon that was Bruce Lee.

Lee was born "Lee Jun Fan" November twenty-seventh 1940 in San Francisco, the son of Lee Hoi Chuen, a singer with the Cantonese Opera. Approximately one year later the family returned to Kowloon in Hong Kong and at the age of five years, a young Bruce begins appearing in children's roles in minor films including The Birth of Mankind and Fu gui fu yun. At the age of 12 Bruce commenced attending La Salle College. Bruce was later beaten up by a street gang, which inspired him to take up martial arts training under the tutelage of "Sifu Yip Man" who schooled Bruce in wing chun kung fu for a period of approximately five years. This was the only formalized martial arts training ever undertaken by Lee. The talented & athletic Bruce also took up cha-cha dancing and at the age of 18 won a major dance championship in Hong Kong.

However his temper and quick fists got him in trouble with the Hong Kong police on numerous occasions. His parents suggested that he head off to the United States. Lee landed in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1959 and worked in a close relative's restaurant. He eventually made his way to Seattle, Washington where he enrolled at university to study philosophy and found the time to practice his beloved kung fu techniques. In 1963 Lee met Linda Emery (later his wife) and also opened his first kung fu school at 4750 University Way. During the early half of the 1960s Lee became associated with many key martial arts figures in the USA including kenpo karate expert Ed Parker and tae kwon do master Jhoon Rhee. He made guest appearances at notable martial arts events including the Long Beach Nationals. Through one of these tournaments Bruce met Hollywood hair-stylist Jay Sebring who introduced him to T.V. producer William Dozier. Based on the runaway success of "Batman" Dozier was keen to bring the cartoon character of "The Green Hornet" to T.V. and was on the lookout for an East Asian actor to play the Green Hornet's sidekick, "Kato". Around this time Bruce also opened a second kung fu school in Oakland, California and relocated to Oakland to be closer to Hollywood.

Bruce's screen test was successful, and "The Green Hornet" starring Van Williams aired in 1966 with mixed success. His fight scenes were sometimes obscured by unrevealing camera angles, but his dedication was such that he insisted his character behave like a perfect bodyguard, keeping his eyes on whoever might be a threat to his employer except when the script made this impossible. The show was surprisingly terminated after only one season (twenty-six episodes), but by this time Lee was receiving more fan mail than the show's nominal star. He then opened a third branch of his kung fu school in Los Angeles and began providing personalized martial arts training to celebrities including film stars Steve McQueen and James Coburn as well as screenwriter Stirling Silliphant. In addition he refined his prior knowledge of wing chun and incorporated aspects of other fighting styles such as traditional boxing and Okinawan karate. He also developed his own unique style "Jeet Kune Do" (Way of the Intercepting Fist). Another film opportunity then came his way as he landed the small role of a stand over man named "Winslow Wong" who intimidates private eye James Garner in Marlowe. Wong pays a visit to Garner and proceeds to demolish the investigator's office with his fists and feet, finishing off with a spectacular high kick that shatters the light fixture. With this further exposure of his talents, Bruce then scored several guest appearances as a martial arts instructor to blind private eye James Franciscus on the TV series Longstreet.

With his minor success in Hollywood and money in his pocket, Bruce returned for a visit to Hong Kong and was approached by film producer Raymond Chow who had recently started "Golden Harvest" productions. Chow was keen to utilize Lee's strong popularity amongst young Chinese fans, and offered him the lead role in _Tang sha da xiong (1971)_ (A.K.A. "The Big Boss"). The film was directed by Wei Lo, shot in Thailand on a very low budget and in terrible living conditions for cast and crew. However, when it opened in Hong Kong the film was an enormous hit. Chow knew he had struck box office gold with Lee and quickly assembled another script entitled The Chinese Connection (A.K.A. "The Chinese Connection", A.K.A. "Fist of Fury"). The second film (with a slightly bigger budget) was again directed by Wei Lo and was set in Shanghai in the year 1900, with Lee returning to his school to find that his beloved master has been poisoned by the local Japanese karate school. Once again he uncovers the evil-doers and sets about seeking revenge on those responsible for murdering his teacher. The film features several superb fight sequences and, at the film's conclusion, Lee refuses to surrender to the Japanese law and seemingly leaps to his death in a hail of police bullets.

Once more Hong Kong streets were jammed with thousands of fervent Chinese movie fans who could not get enough of the fearless Bruce Lee, and his second film went on to break the box office records set by the first! Lee then set up his own production company, Concord Productions, and set about guiding his film career personally by writing, directing and acting in his next film, _Meng long guojiang (1972)_ (A.K.A. "Way of the Dragon", A.K.A. "Return of The Dragon"). A bigger budget meant better locations and opponents, with the new film set in Rome, Italy and additionally starring hapkido expert Ing-Sik Whang, karate legend Robert Wall and seven-time U.S. karate champion Chuck Norris. Bruce plays a seemingly simple country boy sent to assist at a cousin's restaurant in Rome and finds his cousins are being bullied by local thugs for protection.

By now Lee's remarkable success in East Asia had come to the attention of Hollywood film executives and a script was hastily written pitching him as a secret agent penetrating an island fortress. Warner Bros. financed the film and also insisted on B-movie tough guy John Saxon starring alongside Lee to give the film wider appeal. The film culminates with another show-stopping fight sequence between Lee and the key villain, Han, in a maze of mirrors. Shooting was completed in and around Hong Kong in early 1973 and in the subsequent weeks Bruce was involved in completing over dubs and looping for the final cut. Various reports from friends and coworkers cite that he was not feeling well during this period and on July twentieth 1973 he lay down at the apartment of actress Betty Ting Pei after taking a head-ache tablet and was later unable to be revived. A doctor was called and Lee was taken to hospital by ambulance and pronounced dead that evening. The official finding was death due to a cerebral edema, caused by a reaction to the head-ache tablet.

Fans world-wide were shattered that their virile idol had passed at such a young age, and nearly thirty thousand fans filed past his coffin in Hong Kong. A second, much smaller ceremony was held in Seattle, Washington and Bruce was laid to rest at Lake View Cemetary in Seattle with pall bearers including Steve McQueen, James Coburn and Dan Inosanto. Enter the Dragon was later released in the mainland United States, and was a huge hit with audiences there, which then prompted National General films to actively distribute his three prior movies to U.S. theatres... each was a box office smash.

Fans throughout the world were still hungry for more Bruce Lee films and thus remaining footage (completed before his death) of Lee fighting several opponents including Dan Inosanto, Hugh O'Brian and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was crafted into another film titled The Game of Death. The film used a look-alike and shadowy camera work to be substituted for the real Lee in numerous scenes. The film is a poor addition to the line-up and is only saved by the final twenty minutes and the footage of the real Bruce Lee battling his way up the tower. Amazingly this same shoddy process was used to create Game of Death II (A.K.A. "Game of Death II"), with a look-alike and more stunt doubles interwoven with a few brief minutes of footage of the real Bruce Lee.

Tragically his son Brandon Lee, an actor and martial artist like his father, was killed in a freak accident on the set of The Crow.

Bruce Lee was not only an amazing athlete and martial artist but he possessed genuine superstar charisma and through a handful of films he left behind an indelible impression on the tapestry of modern cinema.

Dennis Hopper

Multi-talented and unconventional actor/director regarded by many as one of the true "enfant terribles" of Hollywood who has led an amazing cinematic career for more than five decades, Dennis Hopper was born on May 17, 1936 in Dodge City, Kansas, to Marjorie Mae (Davis) and James Millard Hopper. The young Hopper expressed interest in acting from a young age and first appeared in a slew of 1950s television series, including Medic, Cheyenne and Sugarfoot. His first film role was in Johnny Guitar, which was quickly followed by roles in Rebel Without a Cause, Giant and Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Hopper actually became good friends with James Dean and was shattered when Dean was killed in a car crash on September 30, 1955.

Hopper portrayed a young Napoléon Bonaparte (!) in the star-spangled The Story of Mankind and regularly appeared on screen throughout the 1960s, often in rather undemanding parts, usually as a villain in westerns such as True Grit and Hang 'Em High. However, in early 1969, Hopper, fellow actor Peter Fonda and writer Terry Southern, wrote a counterculture road movie script and managed to scrape together $400,000 in financial backing. Hopper directed the low-budget film, titled Easy Rider, starring Fonda, Hopper and a young Jack Nicholson. The film was a phenomenal box-office success, appealing to the anti-establishment youth culture of the times. It changed the Hollywood landscape almost overnight and major studios all jumped onto the anti-establishment bandwagon, pumping out low-budget films about rebellious hippies, bikers, draft dodgers and pot smokers. However, Hopper's next directorial effort, The Last Movie, was a critical and financial failure, and he has admitted that during the 1970s he was seriously abusing various substances, both legal and illegal, which led to a downturn in the quality of his work. He appeared in a sparse collection of European-produced films over the next eight years, before cropping up in a memorable performance as a pot-smoking photographer alongside Marlon Brando and Martin Sheen in Francis Ford Coppola's Vietnam War epic Apocalypse Now. He also received acclaim for his work in both acting and direction for Out of the Blue.

With these two notable efforts, the beginning of the 1980s saw a renaissance of interest by Hollywood in the talents of Dennis Hopper and exorcising the demons of drugs and alcohol via a rehabilitation program meant a return to invigorating and provoking performances. He was superb in Rumble Fish, co-starred in the tepid spy thriller The Osterman Weekend, played a groovy school teacher in My Science Project, was a despicable and deranged drug dealer in River's Edge and, most memorably, electrified audiences as foul-mouthed Frank Booth in the eerie and erotic David Lynch film Blue Velvet. Interestingly, the offbeat Hopper was selected in the early 1980s to provide the voice of "The StoryTeller" in the animated series of "Rabbit Ears" children's films based upon the works of Hans Christian Andersen!

Hopper returned to film direction in the late 1980s and was at the helm of the controversial gang film Colors, which was well received by both critics and audiences. He was back in front of the cameras for roles in Super Mario Bros., got on the wrong side of gangster Christopher Walken in True Romance, led police officer Keanu Reeves and bus passenger Sandra Bullock on a deadly ride in Speed and challenged gill-man Kevin Costner for world supremacy in Waterworld. The enigmatic Hopper has continued to remain busy through the 1990s and into the new century with performances in The Night We Called It a Day, The Keeper and Land of the Dead.

As well as his acting/directing talents, Hopper was a skilled photographer and painter, having had his works displayed in galleries in both the United States and overseas. He was additionally a dedicated and knowledgeable collector of modern art and has one of the most extensive collections in the United States. Dennis Hopper died of prostate cancer on May 29, 2010, less than two weeks after his 74th birthday.

Reeve Carney

Reeve Carney originated the role of Peter Parker/Spider-Man, in the record-breaking Broadway musical, "Spider-Man: Turn Off Thee Dark" in 2010. A lifelong musician, Reeve jumped at the opportunity to perform a score by U2's Bono and The Edge--not to mention re-team with director Julie Taymor, who he'd worked with in her film, "The Tempest".

In 2013, however, Reeve finally hung up his Spidey suit and headed to Dublin for his latest project: Showtime's much buzzed about new John Logan/Sam Mendes series, "Penny Dreadful". Reeve plays reckless hedonist Dorian Gray.

When he's not finding new ways to terrify himself as an actor, Reeve is diving headfirst into his music. He's currently putting the finishing touches on his upcoming album, "Youth is Wasted," which he recorded primarily in his New York apartment. With his demanding "Spider-Man" schedule, it was impossible to get back and forth to the studio, so Reeve decided to build his own studio--right in his living room.

His bizarre Broadway hours also made teaming up with other musicians all but impossible,so Reeve took matters into his own hands, literally, playing every single instrument himself. Thus, the album has a homespun quality, a la Paul McCartney's "Ram"--which just so happens to be Reeve's all-time favorite album.

Making music is nothing new to Reeve. He signed with Interscope at age 22, and formed his namesake band, Carney, soon after, with his brother, Zane. The bank released its debut album, "Mr. Green Vol. 1,"(DASLabel/Interscope)in 2010 and a live album, "Live at Molly Malone's," in 2007(DASLabel/Interscope).

Reeve becoming a performer was all but a foregone conclusion: pretty much everybody in his family works in the arts. His great-uncle was actor Art Carney. His jewelry designer mother has a degree from Cincinnati College- Conservatory of Music, his father wrote jingles. From early childhood. Reeve sang on his father's jingles. and at age 10, he was already recording with Michael Jackson on "HIStory"

Reeve spent much of his high school years hanging out at blues clubs around Los Angeles, playing with musicians over twice his age--and getting a better music education than any class could provide. His dedication paid off, and, after graduating from Hamilton High School Academy of Music, he got into USC's prestigious Thornton School of Music, but left after a year to pursue his music in earnest.

In an upcoming Jeff Buckley biopic, Reeve will play the late singer, marrying his love of music and acting.

Nicholle Tom

While best known for her role as "Maggie Sheffield" on The Nanny, the now grown-up Nicholle Tom is redefining herself as an actress. Recently, audiences became familiar with her dramatic talents when she starred in the title role of the CBS movie, The Book of Ruth. Co-starring with Emmy-winner Christine Lahti, Nicholle portrays an emotionally abused young woman desperately seeking independence from her over-bearing mother.

This year looks like it will be a banner year for Nicholle. This summer, Nicholle can be see in Windfall for NBC. Nicholle has a five episode arc on the new show in which she plays a speed addict, with a child, who desperately needs money to support her habit. It's a scripted drama that takes a look at the lives of lottery winners.

After that show premieres, viewers can catch Nicholle in the very first comedy series made for the Independent Film Channel (IFC) The Minor Accomplishments of Jackie Woodman. Starring Laura Kightlinger (The Black Dahlia, Will & Grace), Nicholle plays her very ambitious best friend and partner in crime, "Tara Winsel", who will sell her soul to make it in Hollywood.

Nicholle Tom was born in Hinsdale, Illinois on March 23, 1978. She has a twin brother, David Tom, and a sister, Heather Tom, who is two and a half years older. Nicholle started her career together with David in Chicago at the age of eight. She first appeared in print ads and commercials. Soon, the family moved to Seattle. There, she continued to work in commercials, with both David and Heather. Three years later, the Toms decided to move to Los Angeles because of Heather's TV pilot season. There, Nicholle began classes with the Young Actors Space as well as the renowned acting coach Margrit Polak at the Strasberg Institute. It was there that she discovered her passion for acting. Three years later, her dedication and hard work paid off when she was cast as Charles Grodin's oldest daughter in Ivan Reitman's Beethoven, as well as the sequel, Beethoven's 2nd. Nicholle feels very privileged to be able to play such versatile characters in both comedy and drama. Several film and television appearances followed. Nicholle had a recurring role as "Sue Scanlon" on the hit TV show Beverly Hills, 90210. She also starred in several made-for-television movies such as CBS's For My Daughter's Honor (aka Indecent Seduction), portraying a high school girl seduced by her teacher.

In 1992, Nicholle was cast as "Maggie Sheffield" in the CBS sitcom The Nanny. The show, starring Fran Drescher, was a huge hit and ran for six successful years.

Since completing The Nanny, Nicholle costarred with Neve Campbell and William H. Macy in the film Panic, which received critical acclaim at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. She also had a supporting role in Disney's The Princess Diaries with Julie Andrews. Nicholle also voices the character Kara/Supergirl in the animated series Justice League.

Aside from acting, Nicholle is also an aspiring painter. She exhibited her oil paintings for the first time at an art show last February. In her free time, Nicholle enjoys taking impromptu road trips and playing Texas Hold'em with friends.

Nicholle is also very proud of her siblings' success. Her twin brother, David Tom, and older sister, Heather Tom have both won Emmys for their performances on CBS's The Young and the Restless.

In the near future, Nicholle looks forward to working on more television, theater and film projects as well as completing her second art show, and spending time with her tiny toy poodle, Tipsy.

Justine Bateman

Bateman was born in Rye, New York. Her younger brother is actor/director Jason Bateman.

Bateman played the role of superficial Mallory Keaton on the television sitcom Family Ties from 1982 to 1989, for which she was nominated for two Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award. Bateman hosted an episode of Saturday Night Live during its 13th season in 1988. That same year, she starred in the lead role in Satisfaction, a film about an all-girl band that also starred Julia Roberts and Liam Neeson. Bateman starred as the lead vocalist and also performed the vocals on the soundtrack. Bateman co-starred in the 1996-97 NBC sitcom version of the British TV comedy Men Behaving Badly with Rob Schneider and Ron Eldard. She has appeared in several made-for-TV movies, indie films and plays.

Taking a break from the entertainment business, Bateman established a clothing design company, Justine Bateman Designs, and ran it from 2000 until 2003. She was known for her unique one-of-a-kind hand knits and sold to BendelsNY, Saks, and Fred Segal. Justine returned to acting with Out of Order, a Showtime series with Eric Stolz, Felicity Huffman, and Bill Macy. In the third season Arrested Development episode, "Family Ties", her character is initially believed to be Michael Bluth's sister, but she turns out to be a prostitute taken advantage of by his father and pimped by his brother. Michael Bluth was played by Justine Bateman's real-life brother, Jason Bateman. In 2006, she guest starred in the tenth episode of Men in Trees as Lynn Barstow; this turned into a recurring role for the following eight episodes. She also starred as Terry in Still Standing. In 2008, she portrayed a drug dealer who rents a room from Carlos and Gabrielle Solis, in a guest role on Desperate Housewives. That same year, Bateman appeared on an episode of Showtime's Californication. In 2009, she took on the role of Lassiter's ex-wife in USA Network's Psych. Also she was in the third episode of Criminal Minds:Suspect Behavior. The actress made her first script sale to Disney's Wizards of Waverly Place.

Digital career: In the Fall of 2007, Justine helped produce the very successful Speechless campaign in support of the Writers Guild of America strike. Justine began a digital production company, FM78.tv, at this time and her digital future was secured. To accommodate demand, she soon after replaced FM78 with the production and consulting company SECTION 5. Since then she has been sought after as an authority in the space for various panels including The Cannes Lion Int'l Ad Festival, Digital Hollywood, NATPE, and The Branded Content Summit and has been involved creatively in a multitude of digital projects. She acted in John August's (Big Fish, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory) web-series Remnants, Illeana Douglas' (Cape Fear, Good Fellas) IKEA-sponsored web-series Easy to Assemble (for which she won the 2010 Streamy Award for "Best Ensemble Cast" and was nominated for a 2010 Streamy Award for Best Actress in a Comedy Web-Series, and Anthony Zuiker's (CSI creator) digi-novel series Level 26: Dark Prophecy. Bateman served as a producer on Easy to Assemble, created Digital Components for Level 26, is currently writing an adaptation of The Clique for a Warner Bros web-series, producing the film short "Z", and is in talks with various Brands to produce a selection of her scripts. Justine also Co-Produces and Co-stars with fashion maven, Kelly Cutrone, in their internet talk show, Wake Up And Get Real. Personal life: She served on the National Board of Directors of the Screen Actors Guild, until July 2009, when she resigned just prior to the end of her initial 3-year term. In 2008, Bateman testified before the United States Senate Commerce Committee in support of net neutrality. A dedicated advocate for Net Neutrality, Justine serves as an Advisor to FreePress.com

Robert Davi

Robert Davi is an award-winning actor, screenwriter, director, producer and jazz vocalist.

From his portrayal of the opera singing baddie in "The Goonies" and one of the most popular James Bond villains Franz Sanchez in "Licence to Kill" to FBI Special Agent Big Johnson in" Die Hard" or Al Torres in "Showgirls" to most recently Leo Marks in "The Iceman " Robert Davi is one of the film industry's most recognized tough guys . He has also starred in the small screen in hit shows like Profiler, Stargate Atlantis, Criminal Minds and CSI . With over 140 film and TV credits he has frightened us , romanced us ,made us cry or split our seams laughing . He is also one of the top vocalists of our day in interpreting the Great American Songbook, thrilling audiences by playing top venues like the Venetian in Las Vegas where he headlines or for 10,000 people at the Harry Chapin Theater in East Meadow ,Long Island or the Orleans in Vegas where he gave 3 sellout shows with Don Rickles. His debut album Davi Sings Sinatra- On the Road to Romance produced by Phil Ramone shot to number 6 for more than several weeks on Billboard's Jazz Charts.

In his early acting years, Davi attended Hofstra University on a drama scholarship. He then moved to Manhattan, New York where he studied with the legendary acting coach Stella Adler, who became his mentor. Davi became a lifetime member of the Actors Studio, where he studied with acting teacher Lee Strasberg. Always perfecting his craft, Davi studied under Sandra Seacat, Larry Moss, Milton Katselas, Martin Landau, Mala Powers and George Shdanoff, the creative partner and collaborator with Michael Chekhov.

Robert Davi was born in Astoria, Queens, to Maria (Rulli) and Sal Davi. His father was an Italian immigrant and his mother was of Italian descent. Davi was introduced to film when he was cast opposite Frank Sinatra in the telefilm, "Contract on Cherry Street." Later, his work as a Palestinian terrorist in the award-winning television movie, "Terrorist on Trial: The United States vs. Salim Ajami" brought him critical acclaim and caught the eye of legendary James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli and writer Richard Maibaum, who cast Davi as Colombian drug lord and lead villain Franz Sanchez in the Bond film "Licence to Kill." Today, Davi is one of the top Bond villains of all time ranking at the top on many lists. Davi also received critical acclaim within the industry for his provocative portrayal of Bailey Malone in "Profiler." The show struck a chord with audiences, paving the way for such shows as "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," "Without a Trace," "Law & Order: Criminal Intent," "Criminal Minds" and many others. In 2004, Davi joined the cast of television's "Stargate: Atlantis," which earned Davi many science fiction fans. He has also shown his comedic strength in films such as "The 4th Tenor" with Rodney Dangerfield and "The Hot Chick," produced by Rob Schneider and Adam Sandler.

Having appeared in more than 100 motion pictures, some of Davi's most notable film credits span 30 years and include cult-classics and blockbuster hits with roles as Jake Fratelli in "The Goonies," Max Keller in "Raw Deal," Special Agent Big Johnson in "Die Hard," Al Torres in "Showgirls," Leo Marks in "The Iceman" with Michael Shannon, Winona Ryder, Ray Liotta, Chris Evans and James Franco, and most recently, with Sylvester Stallone and Arnold Schwarzenegger among a large A-list cast in "Expendables 3." He has worked with such directors as Steven Spielberg, Richard Donner, Blake Edwards, John McTiernan, Paul Verhoeven and Patrick Hughes. In addition, he has worked on film projects with acting talent such as Marlon Brando, Roberto Benigni, Bruce Willis, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Walken, Benicio Del Toro, Danny Glover and Catherine Zeta Jones, to name a few.

In 2007, Davi produced, directed, co-wrote, and starred in "The Dukes," which tells the story of a once-successful Doo Wop group who fall on hard times. The film won nine awards including the coveted Coup de Coeur award. Davi was also awarded Best First-time Director and Best Screenplay in the Monte Carlo Festival of Comedy by the legendary director Ettore Scola where Prince Albert presented him with the awards. Davi was the only first-time director in the Premiere Section of the International Rome Film Festival along with Sean Penn, Robert Redford, Sidney Lumet, Julie Taymor and others.

In October of 2011, Davi released his debut album, Davi Sings Sinatra: On the Road to Romance (produced by Grammy award-winning producer Phil Ramone) to rave reviews. Within weeks of its highly anticipated release, the album soared onto Billboard Magazine's Top 10 Jazz Chart taking the number 6 spot for several weeks. In response to the release, the legendary Quincy Jones stated, "As FS would say, 'Koo, Koo.' Wow! I have never heard anyone come this close to Sinatra's sound - and still be himself. Many try, but Robert Davi has the voice, tone, the flavor and the swagger. What a surprise. He absolutely touched me down to my soul and brought back the essence and soul of Ol' Blue Eyes himself." In support of the album release, Davi is touring the U.S. with his live stage show, receiving standing ovations. He has performed at The Venetian Resort Hotel Casino in Las Vegas for a three-night engagement, the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza with a 55-piece orchestra, the National Italian-American Foundation's (NIAF) special tribute to the 25th anniversary of its Lifetime Achievement Award to Frank Sinatra at the Washington Hilton in D.C., the Soboba Casino in San Jacinto, Calif., with David Foster at the Beverly Hilton, and in August of 2013, at Long Island's Eisenhower Park for more than 10,000 people. In November of 2013, Davi released the Christmas single, "New York City Christmas."

Besides working in film, television, and music and raising his five children, four dogs and two cats, Davi keeps busy volunteering his time with such charities as The Dream Foundation, Exceptional Children's Foundation, Heart of a Child Foundation, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Youth Foundation, The Humane Society of the United States, Heart of a Horse, NIAF, The Order 'Sons of Italy' in America (OSIA), and UNICO . Since its inception in 1998, Davi has been the National Spokesperson for i-Safe America, which is regarded by many internet experts as the most complete internet safety program in the country and is available in grades K-12 in all 50 U.S. states.

Among his numerous awards for career achievement and community involvement, Davi has received the George M. Estabrook Distinguished Service Award from the Hofstra University Alumni Association (past recipients include Francis Ford Coppola and William Safire). In 2000, Davi was awarded the FBI's Man of the Year Award in Los Angeles. In 2004, Davi was named KNX radios' "Citizen of the Week" for saving a young girl from a fire in her home. The same year, he also received the Sons of Italy's Royal Court of the Golden Lion Award, including a $20,000 donation to a foundation in which he is involved. In addition, he received the 2004 STEP Award (Science, Technology and Education Partnership). In 2007, Davi was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Italian Board of Governors in New York, where New York State recognized his value as an artist and community leader. In 2008, he received the Italo-Americano Award from the Capri-Hollywood Festival. In 2011, Davi was awarded the "Military Order of the Purple Heart" (MOPH) Special Recognition Award for dedication and service honoring America's service members, veterans, and their families. In June of 2013, Davi was honored with a star on the Italian Walk of Fame in Toronto, Canada.

Davi is on The Steering Committee for George Washington University's Homeland Security Policy Institute and is the only entertainer among 28 members, which consists of mainly Senators and former heads of the FBI and CIA. Davi has developed Civilian Patrol 93, which is at Homeland Security, where a lesson plan is being written.

Linda Blair

From the age of five, Linda Blair had to get used to the spotlight, first as a child model and then as an actress, when out of 600 applicants she was picked for the role of Regan, the possessed child, in The Exorcist. Linda quickly rose to international fame, won the Golden Globe, and seemed to be set to take the Academy Award for that role, but when it leaked how some parts of the role were not performed by her (the demonic voice was dubbed by Mercedes McCambridge, and eight seconds of a stunt dummy were used) that dream broke, and with that disappointment probably came the first blow to what looked like the beginning of an A-list career.

Over the next few years she had no trouble securing lead roles in a number of pictures, including the highly successful television films Born Innocent (the #1 TV movie of that year) and Sarah T. - Portrait of a Teenage Alcoholic, as well as the Exorcist sequel Exorcist II: The Heretic. However, when she was peer pressured into buying cocaine at the age of 18, it led to an arrest and subsequent sentencing to three years probation. The much-publicized drug bust caused Linda to be blacklisted in Hollywood, and her career was soon reduced to B-movies and occasional TV guest appearances only.

Although her career never returned to its former glory, Linda proved to be a good sport about embracing the change, and out of the '80s emerged lead roles in two cult classics: the women-in-prison film Chained Heat and the femme fatale vigilante action film Savage Streets. She continued acting in numerous films throughout the '80s and '90s, including the Exorcist spoof Repossessed. In 1997, she also took to the Broadway stage and starred as "Rizzo" in the revival of "Grease." She received widespread mainstream attention again in the 2000's with the theatrical re-release of the Exorcist, followed by a hosting job on the hit Fox Family TV series Scariest Places on Earth, which ran for six years and followed Linda as she visited notorious "haunted" locations around the world.

Today Linda has been a Hollywood icon for 40 years, but it is her first love of animals that has ultimately taken center stage in her life. She now runs the Linda Blair WorldHeart Foundation, a non-profit 501C3 tax deductible organization dedicated to rescuing and rehabilitating abused, neglected, and abandoned animals from the harsh streets of the Los Angeles area, as well as from the overcrowded and overwhelmed city and county animal shelters. She works and lives on the 2-acre rescue sanctuary full-time in California, which was featured on The Today Show in a segment titled "From Devil to Angel." Of course, she also makes frequent appearances at horror fan conventions to celebrate the legacy of the Exorcist.

Peter Mullan

He was interested in directing films at the age of 19 and he made several shorts. As he wasn't admitted to the National Film School, he decided to dedicate himself to acting, and made his debut in the theatre in 1988 before moving to cinema and television. Fame came with the parts he played in such films as Riff-Raff by Ken Loach, Braveheart by Mel Gibson and Trainspotting by Danny Boyle, but above all when he won for best leading actor at the Cannes Film Festival in 1998 for My Name Is Joe, once again by Loach. The Magdalene Sisters is the second feature-length film he has directed. He also directed a few episodes of the BBC TV series, Cardiac Arrest, which earned him a best director nomination from the Royal Television Society.

Beth Broderick

Beth Alison Broderick was born on February 24, 1959 in Falmouth, Kentucky, USA but was raised in Huntington Beach, California. Beth was always very interested in theater as a child and she graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in Pasadena, California at age 18. After that, she moved to New York and began her professional acting career. She stopped acting for a few years to dedicate herself to dealing with the AIDS crisis in the early eighties. When she was 27, she started acting again and she made her debut in 1988 when she played the sexy neighbor who seduces a young, innocent Jonathan Silverman in Stealing Home. In 1990, she appeared in The Bonfire of the Vanities. She has also appeared in several theater productions like "Carnal Knowledge", "Triplets in Uniform" and "Zastrozzi, the Master of Discipline" (which she also co-produced). In New York, she has starred in "The Mousetrap", "The Lion in Winter" and many more. Beth is not only an actress, she is also a writer and she has written "A Cup of Joe", "Wonderland" and "Literatti" with Dennis Bailey. Beth is also a director and she has directed an episode of Sabrina, the Teenage Witch called Making the Grade. She has been active in the battle against AIDS since 1984 and she is the founding director of "Momentum", one of the first organizations in New York established to assist people with AIDS. Beth was also a founding member of the Celebrity Action Council of the City Light Women's Rehabilitation Program at the Los Angeles Mission, which provides hands-on service to homeless women, helps them to overcome substance abuse and learn job skills to help them reclaim their lives and families.

Stacy Keach

Stacy Keach has played to grand success a constellation of the classic and contemporary stage's greatest roles, and he is considered a pre-eminent American interpreter of Shakespeare. His SRO run as "King Lear" at the Shakespeare Theatre Company in Washington, D.C. received the best reviews any national leader has earned in that town for decades. Peter Marks of the Washington Post called Mr. Keach's Lear "magnificent". He recently accepted his third prestigious Helen Hayes Award for Leading Actor in 2010 for his stellar performance. His next stage appearance premiering January 13, 2011 at the Lincoln Center in New York is "Other Desert Cities" by Jon Robin Baitz and teaming him with Stockard Channing, Linda Lavin and Elizabeth Marvel.

His latest television series, Lights Out, on the FX network is a major new mid-season dramatic show, taking him back to the world of boxing which has been a rich setting for him before, notably in Huston's Fat City which ignited Keach's career as a film star.

Versatility embodies the essence of Stacy Keach's career in film and television as well as on stage. The range of his roles is remarkable. His recent performance in Oliver Stone's "W" prompted fellow actor Alec Baldwin to blog an impromptu review matching Huston's amazement at Keach's power. Perhaps best known around the world for his portrayal of the hard-boiled detective, Mike Hammer, Stacy Keach is also well-known among younger generations for his portrayal of the irascible, hilarious Dad, Ken Titus, in the Fox sitcom, Titus, and more recently as Warden Henry Pope in the hit series, Prison Break. Following his triumphant recent title role performance in King Lear for the prestigious Goodman Theatre in Chicago, Keach joined the starring cast of John Sayles' recent film, Honeydripper. In the most recent of his non-stop activities, he has completed filming Deathmatch for the Spike Channel, and The Boxer for Zeitsprung Productions in Berlin, Germany.

German audiences will also see him as one of the co-stars in the multi-million dollar production of Hindenburg, scheduled to air in January, 2011 with worldwide release thereafter. Mr. Keach co-stars in the new FX series entitled Lights Out about a boxing family, where he plays the Dad-trainer of two boxing sons played by Holt McCallany and Pablo Schreiber. The series is also scheduled to air in January, 2011. Keach returns to the New York stage at the start of the 2011 in Jon Robin Baitz's new play, "Other Desert Cities," at the Lincoln Center.

Capping his heralded accomplishment on the live stage of putting his own stamp on some of the theatre world's most revered and challenging roles over the past year when he headed the national touring company cast of "Frost/Nixon," portraying Richard M. Nixon, bringing still another riveting characterization to the great legit stages of Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, the nation's capitol and other major cities. He won his second Best Actor Helen Hayes Award for his outstanding performance. His second triumphant portrayal of King Lear in the past three years, this time for the Shakespeare Theatre Company in the nation's capital earned reviews heard around the world, with resulting offers for him to repeat that giant accomplishment in New York, Los Angeles and even Beijing.

An accomplished pianist and composer, Mr. Keach composed the music for the film, Imbued, directed by Rob Nilssen, a celebrated film festival favorite, in which Keach also starred. He has also completed composing the music for the Mike Hammer audio radio series, "Encore For Murder", written by Max Collins, directed by Carl Amari, and produced by Blackstone Audio.

Mr. Keach began his film career in the late 1960's with _The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter_, followed by _The New Centurions_ with George C. Scott; Doc Holiday with Faye Dunaway in the film 'Doc'; an over-the-hill boxer,Billy Tully in Fat City; directed by John Huston, and The Long Riders, which he co-produced and co-wrote with his brother, James Keach, directed by Walter Hill. On the lighter side, his characterization of Sgt. Stedenko in Cheech and Chong's Up in Smoke, and the sequel, Nice Dreams, gave a whole new generation a taste of Mr. Keach's comedic flair, which he also demonstrated in Robert Altman's Brewster McCloud, playing the oldest living lecherous Wright Brother; and The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean where he played a crazed albino out to kill Paul Newman.

Historical roles have always attracted him. In movies he has played roles ranging from Martin Luther to Frank James. On television he has been Napoleon, Wilbur Wright, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Barabbas, Sam Houston, and Ernest Hemingway, for which he won a Golden Globe as Best Actor in a mini-series and was nominated for an Emmy in the same category. He played an eccentric painter, Mistral, in the Judith Krantz classic, Mistral's Daughter, a northern spy in the civil war special, The Blue and the Gray, more recently as the pirate Benjamin Hornigold in the Hallmark epic Blackbeard.

As a director, his production of Arthur Miller's Incident at Vichy for PBS was, according to Mr. Miller in his autobiography, Timebends, "the most expressive production of that play he had seen." He won a Cine Golden Eagle Award for his work on the dramatic documentary, The Repeater, in which he starred and also wrote and directed.

But it is perhaps the live theatre where Mr. Keach shines brightest. He began his professional career with the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1964, doubling as Marcellus and the Player King in a production of Hamlet directed by Joseph Papp and which featured Julie Harris as Ophelia. He rose to prominence in 1967 in the Off-Broadway political satire, MacBird, where the title role was a cross between Lyndon Johnson and Macbeth and for which he received the first of his three Obie awards. He played the title roles in Henry 5, Hamlet (which he played 3 times), Richard 3, Macbeth, and most recently as King Lear in Robert Falls' modern adaptation at Chicago's Goodman Theatre, which Charles Isherwood of the NY Times called "terrific" and "a blistering modern-dress production that brings alive the morally disordered universe of the play with a ferocity unmatched by any other production I've seen." Mr. Keach's stage portrayals of Peer Gynt, Falstaff and Cyrano de Bergerac, and Hamlet caused the New York Times to dub him "the finest American classical actor since John Barrymore."

Mr. Keach's Broadway credits include his Broadway debut, Indians, where he played Buffalo Bill and was nominated for a Tony award as Best Actor. He starred in Ira Levin's Deathtrap, the Pulitzer Prize winning Kentucky Cycle (for which he won his first Helen Hayes award as Best Actor), the Rupert Holmes one-man thriller, Solitary Confinement, where Mr. Keach played no less than six roles, all unbeknownst to the audience until the end of the play. In the musical theatre, he starred in the national tour of Barnum, played the King in Camelot for Pittsburgh's Civic Light Opera, and the King in The King and I, which he also toured in Japan. He starred in the Jon Robin Baitz play, Ten Unknowns, at the Mark Taper Forum in 2003. The LA Times said: "And then there's Keach. What a performance! How many actors can manage such thunder and such sweet pain. He's been away from the LA stage too long. Welcome back."

In 2004, he starred as Scrooge in Boston's Trinity Rep musical production of A Christmas Carol; earlier in 2004, he starred as Phil Ochsner in Arthur Miller's last play Finishing The Picture, directed by Robert Falls at the Goodman Theatre.

As a narrator his voice has been heard in countless documentaries; as the host for the Twilight Zone radio series; numerous books on tape, including the Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway. In the year 2000, he recorded a CD of all of Shakespeare's Sonnets. He recently recorded the voice of St. Paul for a new audio version of The New Testament:, The Word of Promise and Job for the Old Testament edition. He is the narrator on CNBC's new hit show, American Greed, and recently narrated the award-winning documentary, The Pixar Story. He has also reprised his role as Mike Hammer in the Blackstone audio series, the most recent being "Encore for Murder". A charter-member of LA Theatre Works, Mr. Keach recently played the title role in Bertolt Brecht's Galileo, recorded both for radio and CD. He was seen on CBS's hit show Two and a Half Men as the gay Dad of Charlie's fiance.

Stacy Keach also believes strongly in 'giving back' and has been the Honorary Chair for the Cleft Palate Foundation for the past twenty-five years. He is also the national spokesman for the World Craniofacial organization. He has served on the Artist's Committee for the Kennedy Center Honors for two decades, is on the board of directors for Genesis at the Crossroads, a Chicago-based organization dedicated to bringing peoples of combatant cultures together through the shared artistic expressions of the visual and culinary arts, music, dance, and theater. He also serves on the artistic board for Washington DC's Shakespeare Theatre National Council, where he was also honored in 2000 with their prestigious Millennium Award for his contribution to classical theatre. Some years ago Hollywood honored him with a Celebrity Outreach Award for his work with charitable organizations.

He has been the recipient of Lifetime Achievement Awards from Pacific Pioneer's Broadcasters, the San Diego Film Festival, the Pacific Palisades Film Festival, and The 2007 Oldenburg Film Festival in Germany. Later this year, he will be awarded the 2010 Lifetime Award from the St. Louis Film Festival. In 2008, he received the Mary Pickford Award for versatility in acting.

Mr. Keach was a Fulbright scholar to the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, attended the University of California at Berkeley and the Yale Drama School. He has always been a star of the American stage, especially in Shakespearen roles such as Hamlet, Henry 5, Coriolanus, Falstaff, Macbeth, Richard 3, and most recently, King Lear.

Of his many accomplishments, Mr. Keach claims that his greatest accomplishment is his family. He has been married to his beautiful wife Malgosia for twenty-five years, and they have two wonderful children, Shannon Keach (1988), and daughter Karolina Keach (1990).

Daniel Dae Kim

Through the diversity of his roles on stage and screen, Daniel Dae Kim continues to expand our perceptions of the Asian-American man. In characters ranging from the King of Siam, a Shakespearean hero, a social worker for the Chicago needy, to a counter-terrorist agent, his work has consistently proven to transcend the historical barriers of race and stereotype.

Daniel's most recent work on ABC's Lost, is no exception. As "Jin Soo Kwon", a Korean businessman and reluctant enforcer for his father-in-law, his character transformed from an overprotective "traditional" husband to a man who re-learns how to live and love. His portrayal of this multi-faceted character signaled a breakthrough for primetime network television, and has helped make Lost a worldwide hit since its debut in 2004.

Since then, both Daniel and the show have been widely recognized for their excellence. Sharing a 2006 Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Ensemble, the Korean-American actor's universal appeal was also recognized by "People" Magazine, which named him one of the "Sexiest Men Alive" in 2005, as well as "TV Guide", which recognized him as one of "TV's Sexiest Men" in 2006. In that same year, Daniel was individually honored with an AZN Asian Excellence Award, a Multicultural Prism Award and a Vanguard Award from the Korean American Coalition, all for Outstanding Performance by an Actor. In 2009, his recognition continues with the prestigious KoreAm Journal Achievement Award in the field of Arts and Entertainment.

Born in Busan, South Korea and raised in New York and Pennsylvania, Daniel discovered acting while a student at Haverford College. Though briefly considering a career as an attorney, he decided to follow his true passion and moved to New York City, where he began his work on stage. There, he performed in classics such as "Romeo and Juliet", Anton Chekhov's "Ivanov" and Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House", as well as working with an improv comedy troupe. Despite his early success, however, he decided to deepen his dedication to the craft by studying at the Graduate Acting program at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, where he earned a Master's Degree in Fine Arts in 1996.

Upon graduation, Daniel's film career began in earnest with roles in The Jackal, For Love of the Game, The Hulk, Spider-Man 2 and The Cave, as well as the Academy Award-winner for Best Picture, Crash. Most recently, he completed production on The Adjustment Bureau, starring Matt Damon and directed by George Nolfi.

On television, he's guest-starred on numerous shows, including CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, ER and, for two seasons, 24 as CTU Agent "Tom Baker". In 2008, he also starred in the Emmy-nominated mini-series adaptation of Michael Crichton's The Andromeda Strain. Kim has also complemented his television work by lending his voice talents to video games, creating characters in "Saints Row" 1 and 2, "Scarface: The World Is Yours", "Tenchu" and "24", as well as the animated TV series' Justice League Unlimited and Avatar: The Last Airbender.

This past summer, Daniel rekindled his love for the stage by performing the role of the "King of Siam" in the iconic production, "The King and I", directed by Jeremy Sams, at London's world-renowned Royal Albert Hall.

Though he spends time in Los Angeles and New York, Daniel spends most of the year in Honolulu, where he devotes his free time to a number of different charities, his restaurant and his family.

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