1-50 of 1,698 names.

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1. John Wayne John Wayne Actor, The Searchers John Wayne (born Marion Morrison) was the son of pharmacist Clyde Morrison and his wife Mary. Clyde developed a lung condition that required him to move his family from Iowa to the warmer climate of southern California, where they tried ranching in the Mojave Desert. Until the ranch failed, Marion and his younger brother Robert E. Morrison swam in an irrigation ditch and rode a horse to school...
2. Katharine Hepburn Katharine Hepburn Actress, Bringing Up Baby Born May 12, 1907 in Hartford, Connecticut, she was the daughter of a doctor and a suffragette, both of whom always encouraged her to speak her mind, develop it fully, and exercise her body to its full potential. An athletic tomboy as a child, she was also very close to her brother, Tom, and was devastated at age 14 to find him dead...
3. Laurence Olivier Laurence Olivier Actor, Rebecca He could speak William Shakespeare's lines as naturally as if he were "actually thinking them", said English playwright Charles Bennett, who met Laurence Olivier in 1927. One of Olivier's earliest successes as a Shakespearean actor on the London stage came in 1935 when he played "Romeo" and "Mercutio" in alternate performances of "Romeo and Juliet" with John Gielgud...
4. Burgess Meredith Burgess Meredith Actor, Rocky One of the truly great and gifted performers of the century who often suffered lesser roles, Burgess Meredith was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1907 and educated in Amherst College in Massachusetts before joining Eva Le Gallienne's stage company in New York City in 1933. He became a favorite of dramatist Maxwell Anderson...
5. Barbara Stanwyck Barbara Stanwyck Actress, Double Indemnity Today Barbara Stanwyck is remembered primarily as the matriarch of the family known as the Barkleys on the TV western The Big Valley, wherein she played Victoria, and from the hit drama The Colbys. But she was known to millions of other fans for her movie career, which spanned the period from 1927 until 1964...
6. Rosalind Russell Rosalind Russell Actress, His Girl Friday The middle of seven children, she was named after the S.S. Rosalind at the suggestion of her father, a successful lawyer. After receiving a Catholic school education, she went to the American Academy of Dramatic Art in New York, having convinced her mother that she intended to teach acting. In 1934...
7. Cesar Romero Cesar Romero Actor, Batman: The Movie Tall, suave and sophisticated Cesar Romero actually had two claims to fame in Hollywood. To one generation, he was the distinguished Latin lover of numerous musicals and romantic comedies, and the rogue bandit The Cisco Kid in a string of low-budget westerns. However, to a younger generation weaned on television...
8. Paul Douglas Paul Douglas Actor, Panic in the Streets A rare breed this guy. Paul Douglas became an unlikely middle-aged cinema star by simply capitalizing on his big, burly, brash and boorish appeal to the nth degree. The 5'11", 200 lb. actor was a bold, unabashed risk taker. He forsook an extremely successful career as one of the country's top radio/sports announcers to prove his value as an actor...
9. Jack Albertson Jack Albertson Actor, Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory A former song-and-dance man and veteran of vaudeville, burlesque and Broadway, Jack Albertson is best known to audiences as "The Man" in the TV series Chico and the Man, for which he won an Emmy. In 1968 Albertson, the brother of actress Mabel Albertson, won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in The Subject Was Roses, a part which also won him the Tony award during its Broadway run.
10. Robert Young Robert Young Actor, Crossfire Quiet, soft-spoken Robert grew up in California and had some stage experience with the Pasadena Playhouse before entering films in 1931. His movie career consisted of playing characters who were charming, good-looking--and bland. In fact, his screen image was such that he usually never got the girl...
11. Arlene Francis Arlene Francis Self, Episode dated 15 September 1963 Actress, TV/radio hostess, panelist, and early-TV celebrity. Her parents discouraged her from pursuing a stage career, sending her instead to an exclusive New York finishing school. She dropped her surname, altered the spelling of her first name, and went to Hollywood to seek a career in films. After her first film...
12. John Marley John Marley Actor, The Godfather Veteran character actor John Marley was one of those familiar but nameless faces that television and filmgoers did not take a shine to until the late 1960s, when he had hit middle age. Distinctive for his craggy face, dark bushy brows and upswept silvery hair, his life (born in 1907) started out amid tough surroundings in Harlem...
13. Fay Wray Fay Wray Actress, King Kong Canadian-born Fay Wray was brought up in Los Angeles and entered films at an early age. She was barely in her teens when she started working as an extra. She began her career as a heroine in westerns at Universal during the silent era. In 1926 the Western Association of Motion Picture Advertisers selected 13 young starlets it deemed most likely to succeed in pictures...
14. Dub Taylor Dub Taylor Actor, Back to the Future Part III
15. John McIntire John McIntire Actor, Psycho John McIntire possessed the requisite grit, craggy features and crusty, steely-eyed countenance to make for one of television and film's most durable supporting players of western settings. Born in Spokane, Washington in 1907 and the son of a lawyer, he grew up in Montana where he learned to raise and ride broncos on the family homestead...
16. Cab Calloway Cab Calloway Soundtrack, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Bandleader, songwriter ("Minnie the Moocher", "Are You Hep to That Jive?"), composer, singer, actor and author, educated at Crane College. While studying law, he sang with the band The Alabamians, and took over the group in 1928. He led The Missourians orchestra, then organized and led his own orchestra...
17. Gene Autry Gene Autry Soundtrack, Sleepless in Seattle After high school Gene Autry worked as a laborer for the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad in Oklahoma. Next he was a telegrapher. In 1928 he began singing on a local radio station, and three years later he had his own show and was making his first recordings. Three years after that he made his film...
18. Barbara Luddy Barbara Luddy Actress, Sleeping Beauty
19. Mike Mazurki Mike Mazurki Actor, Some Like It Hot With an intimidating face like craggy granite and a towering 6'5" solid frame, Mike Mazurki (born Mikhail Mazurski) was one of cinema's first serial thugs and specialized in playing strongarm men, gangsters and bullies for over 50 years on screen. Nearly always portrayed as a lowbrow muscle, in real life Mazurski was highly intelligent...
20. Sheldon Leonard Sheldon Leonard Producer, The New Housekeeper Sheldon Leonard was born in New York City's lower Manhattan, the son of Jewish parents. He studied acting at Syracuse University and, after graduating, landed a job on Wall Street. Following the Wall Street crash of 1929, he found himself unemployed and resolved to become a professional actor on the stage...
21. Jacques Tati Jacques Tati Actor, Mr. Hulot's Holiday The comic genius Jacques Tati was born Taticheff, descended from a noble Russian family. His grandfather, Count Dimitri, had been a general in the Imperial Army and had served as military attaché to the Russian Embassy in Paris. His father, Emmanuel Taticheff, was a well-to-do picture framer who conducted his business in the fashionable Rue de Castellane and had taken a Dutch-Italian woman...
22. Alan Reed Alan Reed Actor, Breakfast at Tiffany's Character player Alan Reed was a strong, burly presence on film and TV but he would be better remembered in the long run for his equally strong, distinctive voice. He gave vocal life to the prehistoric cartoon character Fred Flintstone on the prime-time TV series The Flintstones in the 1960s, and it is this direct association that has kept his name alive long after his passing...
23. Dan Duryea Dan Duryea Actor, Scarlet Street Dan Duryea was definitely the man you went to the movies for and loved to hate. His sniveling, deliberately taunting demeanor and snarling flat, nasal tones set the actor apart from other similar slimeballs of the 1940s and 1950s. From his very first picture, the highly acclaimed The Little Foxes, in which he portrayed the snotty...
24. James Robertson Justice James Robertson Justice Actor, The Guns of Navarone James Robertson Justice was always a noticeable presence in a film with his large stature, bushy beard and booming voice. A Ph.D., a journalist, a naturalist, an expert falconer, a racing car driver, JRJ was certainly a man of many talents. He entered the film industry quite late in life (37) after he was spotted serving as MC for a local music hall...
25. Billy De Wolfe Billy De Wolfe Actor, Frosty the Snowman Most certainly egged on by the dandified antics of an Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore and/or Franklin Pangborn, burlesque clown Billy DeWolfe in turn gave obvious inspiration to such effete cutups as Paul Lynde and Charles Nelson Reilly. Billy's life was one hundred percent show business from start to finish in a career that lasted five decades...
26. Bernard Miles Bernard Miles Actor, The Man Who Knew Too Much The British character actor Bernard Miles was born in Uxbridge, Middlesex, England, in 1907; his father was a farm laborer and his mother was a cook. After graduation from Pembroke College, Oxford, he was a teacher for a while and then joined the New Theatre in London. In 1937, he worked in Herbert Farjeon's revue company and established his theatrical career...
27. Leon Askin Leon Askin Actor, One, Two, Three As a nine year-old boy, Leon Askin recited a 17-stanza eulogy for Emperor Franz Josef in front of the city hall in Vienna's 9th District. Little did the son of a salesman know then that he would one day be the student of Max Reinhardt and Louise Dumont, and discover Jura Soyfer while directing the political cabaret "ABC"...
28. Fred Zinnemann Fred Zinnemann Director, High Noon Initially grew up wanting to be a violinist, but while at the University of Vienna decided to study law. While doing so, he became increasingly interested in American film and decided that was what he wanted to do. He became involved in European filmaking for a short time before going to America to study film.
29. Bob Steele Bob Steele Actor, The Big Sleep American Western star and character actor whose career spanned six decades. The son of director Robert N. Bradbury, he appeared in vaudeville with his parents and with his twin brother Bill Bradbury appeared as a child in a series of 16 semi- documentary short films directed by their father, The Adventures of Bob and Bill...
30. Lurene Tuttle Lurene Tuttle Actress, Psycho Quite a familiar lady and notorious busybody on 1950s and '60s TV and film, petite, red-headed character actress Lurene Tuttle was born in Pleasant Lake, Indiana and raised on a ranch close to the Arizona border. Her father, O.V. Tuttle, started out as a performer in minstrels but found a job as a railroad station agent when times got hard...
31. Iron Eyes Cody Iron Eyes Cody Actor, Ernest Goes to Camp Iron Eyes Cody was born Espera or "Oscar" DeCorti, the son of two first-generation immigrants from Italy. In 1924 he moved to California, changed his name from "DeCorti" to "Corti" to Cody, and started working as an actor, presenting himself as a Native American. He married an Indian woman, Bertha Parker...
32. Willis Bouchey Willis Bouchey Actor, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance Willis Bouchey appeared in almost 150 movies and television shows over a 30-year period from 1951 to 1979. He was one of those wonderful character actors who would be a crooked judge in one film and a humorous cavalry officer in another. He appeared in many of John Ford's movies as well as James Stewart's films...
33. Frank Wilcox Frank Wilcox Actor, The Greatest Show on Earth Following a year at the University of Kansas, Wilcox returned to Atchison where he worked for Lockwood-Hazel Printing Co. He attended St. Benedict's College in Atchison for a year and a half and graduated in the class of 1933. Wilcox received the Cross of the Order of St. Benedict, given for the first time ever in 1969...
34. Henri-Georges Clouzot Henri-Georges Clouzot Writer, Diabolique After a decade as a screenwriter, Clouzot made his directorial debut in 1942. His next film, Le Corbeau: The Raven had the distinction of being banned both by the Nazis and the victorious French forces for differing reasons. He shot to international fame with The Wages of Fear and consolidated that success with Diabolique...
35. Helen Kleeb Helen Kleeb Actress, Seven Days in May
36. Peggy Ashcroft Peggy Ashcroft Actress, The 39 Steps Academy Award-winning, legendary English actress - who maintained her status in the British acting elite for decades. Made a Dame of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II in 1956. Almost always on stage, she appeared rarely in film, her first being The Wandering Jew. On stage she was cast in many a Shakespearean role...
37. Joseph Kearns Joseph Kearns Actor, Alice in Wonderland
38. Kent Smith Kent Smith Actor, Cat People He was one of Hollywood's more interesting curiosities. Kent Smith, by most standards, had the makings of a topflight 40s and 50s film star -- handsome; virile; personable; highly dedicated; equipped with a rich stage background; no slouch in the talent department. For some reason all these fine qualities...
39. Isabel Jewell Isabel Jewell Actress, Gone with the Wind Isabel Jewell was born on July 19, 1907 in Shoshonu, Wyoming. Her father was a successful doctor and the family lived on a large ranch. Isabel was educated at St. Mary's Academy in Minnesota and later attended Hamilton college. When she was a teenager Isabel began acting in stock companies. In 1930 she was cast in the Broadway show "Up Pops the Devil"...
40. Irene Tedrow Irene Tedrow Actress, The Cincinnati Kid Denver-born supporting actress Irene Tedrow is another in a long line of "I know the face...but not the name" character actors whose six-decade career was known more for its durability than for the greatness of roles she played. Born in 1907, she was a lady primarily of the stage, beginning her acting career as a teen...
41. Joe Besser Joe Besser Actor, Africa Screams Short, chubby, balding, childish character actor Joe Besser began his career on the vaudeville circuit before breaking into films in the early 1930s. He was a frequent foil of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello in their films and played 'Stinky' on their 1950s TV show. Joe joined The Three Stooges in 1956...
42. Daphne Du Maurier Daphne Du Maurier Writer, The Birds Daphne Du Maurier was one of the most popular English writers of the 20th Century, when middle-brow genre fiction was accorded a higher level of respect in a more broadly literate age. For her services to literature, she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1969, the female equivalent of a knighthood...
43. Alexander Knox Alexander Knox Actor, Wilson A Presbyterian minister's son, softly-spoken, intellectual-looking Alexander Knox received his education from the University of Western Ontario, where he studied English literature. An excellent elocutionist, member of the university's Hesperian Club, he had his first fling with dramatic acting playing the lead in "Hamlet"...
44. Alvin Childress Alvin Childress Actor, Thunderbolt and Lightfoot
45. Mary Treen Mary Treen Actress, It's a Wonderful Life About as reliable as one could ever find, character actress Mary Treen was a familiar face to most and could always be counted on to bring a bit of levity to any film scene. A minor actress for much of her career, she managed to secure a plain, unassuming niche for herself in 40s, 50s and 60s Hollywood...
46. Shepperd Strudwick Shepperd Strudwick Actor, One Life to Live Actor Sheppard Strudwick had dark, dignified, matinée-styled good looks but with a slightly shady countenance that may have prevented him from attaining top "leading man" stardom in films. Nevertheless he earned distinguished marks in a number of films and returned most frequently to his first love, the theater, throughout his career...
47. Malcolm Atterbury Malcolm Atterbury Actor, The Birds Philadelphia native Malcolm Atterbury was born into a wealthy family - his father was president of the Pennsylvania Railroad - but he himself had no desire to go into the family business. He had always wanted to be an actor, and to that end got himself a job managing a radio station. From there he went into vaudeville...
48. Gordon Douglas Gordon Douglas Director, Them! Starting out as a child actor, Gordon Douglas was eventually hired by Hal Roach as a gag writer. His first directorial assignments were for Roach's "Our Gang" series. Graduating to features, Douglas stayed with comedies, directing Oliver Hardy in Zenobia and both Hardy and Stan Laurel in Saps at Sea...
49. Jean Anderson Jean Anderson Actress, The Little Kidnappers Gaunt Sussex-born actress of Scottish descent whose dignified manner and plain, but expressive features qualified her for a wide range of character parts, from austere nurses and long-suffering mothers to overbearing dowagers and nosy gossips; from meddlesome chaperones to authoritarian aunts and intransigent spinsters...
50. Robert A. Heinlein Robert A. Heinlein Writer, Starship Troopers Prolific science-fiction author. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, he retired, disabled, in 1934. Began writing science fiction in 1939. Winner of four Hugo Awards. Guest commentator for the 1969 Apollo 11 lunar landing. Recipient of the Grand Master Nebula Award for lifetime achievement.
1-50 of 1,698 names.