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Channing Tatum, Adam Driver and a Crazed Daniel Craig Team Up in ‘Logan Lucky’ Trailer (Watch)

1 hour ago

Steven Soderbergh returns to the big screen with a gaggle of wacky characters in the first trailer for “Logan Lucky.”

That includes Channing Tatum who is reuniting with the director after working with him on “Haywire,” “Side Effects,” and “Magic Mike.” The movie following sibling Jimmy, (Tatum) Mellie (Riley Keough), and Clyde Logan (Adam Driver) who set out to execute an elaborate robbery during the Coca-Cola 600 race.

But to do so, they’re going to need some help. That’s where Joe Bang (Daniel Craig) comes in.

“I am in-car-cer-a-ted,” Craig tells Tatum and Driver. “Yeah, we got a plan to get you out.” Tatum responds.

“You Logans must be a simple-minded as people say,” Craig says later in the trailer.

Judging by the trailer alone, Craig’s manic disposition and loud cackle hint a major departure from the even-keeled James Bond that launched him to stardom.

The all-star ensemble cast also includes Seth MacFarlane, »


- Seth Kelley

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PopPolitics: ‘War Machine’ Director on the Futility of Another Troop Surge in Afghanistan (Listen)

4 hours ago

David Michod, the director of the new Netflix movie “War Machine,” debuting this weekend, said that his initial reaction to reports that President Trump’s advisers are calling for more troops in Afghanistan was one of “bewilderment.”

“I can’t pretend to be surprised,” he tells Variety‘s “PopPolitics” on SiriusXM. “We are now in the 16th year of this conflict. It is not wholly surprising to me that the architects of this mess can’t let it go.” He adds, “We are talking about an institution, the military, for which the metric of success is as binary in victory and defeat. It is hardly surprising that the first cause of action, and the recurring cause of action. is always to try to throw more troops at the problem.”

Related

PopPolitics: ‘Hell on Earth’ Director on the ‘Risk-Reward’ of Filming in Syria (Listen)

In “War Machine,” Brad Pitt plays the fictitious general Glen McMahon, »


- Ted Johnson

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Korea Box Office: ‘Pirates’ Rules Weekend, ‘President’ Lands in Second

5 hours ago

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales,” landed on top of the South Korean box office, accounting for 48% of the total weekend revenue. Opening on 1,323 screens nationwide on Wednesday (May 24), the Disney release earned $11.5 million from 1.52 million admissions in five days. Its opening day was $1.46 million exceeding that of “Beauty and the Beast,” 2017’s biggest non-Korean release.

Political documentary, “Our President” debuted in second. The Thursday opener earned $4.36 million in first four days, by far the biggest opening weekend score for a homegrown independent documentary. The film revisits the journey of Roh Moo-hyun, South Korea’s president from 2003 to 2008.

Upi’s “Get Out” and Cj Entertainment’s Cannes entry “The Merciless” slipped to third and fourth, respectively. “Get Out” earned $3.01 million between Friday and Sunday for a total of $12.7 million after two weekends. “Merciless” earned $826,000 between Friday and Sunday for a total of $6.13 million.

DreamWorks’ “Boss Baby” dropped to fifth, »


- Sonia Kil

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China Box Office: ‘Pirates’ Sails Off With $66 Million Opening

5 hours ago

Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” enjoyed one of the widest releases in Chinese history and opened with a $66 million three-day weekend opening.

The film played 115,000 screenings on Friday, expanding to over 130,000 on Saturday, and then 115,000 on Sunday. According to data from local provider Ent Group, “Pirates” scored $19.3 million on Friday, $19.4 million on Saturday, and enjoyed its biggest day on Sunday with $25.3 million, the first day of the two-day Dragon Boat Festival public holiday.

The film’s cumulative score, including previews, puts it in the top 20 of all time in China, but also a long way behind the $184 million scored by “The Fate of the Furious” some six weeks earlier. “Furious 8” enjoyed some 160,000 screenings per day at its peak, and now has a total of $390 million.

“Pirates” was a huge hit on IMAX screens in China. It earned some $9 million of its China total on 401 IMAX screens. »


- Patrick Frater

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‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Sails Toward $300 Million Opening Weekend Worldwide

6 hours ago

Disney’s latest crack at the “Pirates of the Caribbean” franchise appears to be a global hit.

The fifth installment, subtitled “Dead Men Tell No Tales” is sailing to $270.6 million at the international box office. That, combined with the $77 million it’s expected to pull in over the four-day holiday domestically, should easily put the film over $300 million globally during its opening frame.

In China alone the movie will make an estimated $67.8 million. The third highest opening for any Disney movie is partially attributed to the opening coinciding with the country’s Dragon Boat Festival holidays.

The film saw the largest opening of all time in Russia with $18.1 million ($18.6 million including previews). The rest of the top five territories are Korea ($11.6 million); France ($9.3 million); and Germany ($8.4 million).

“Dead Men Tell No Tales” centers on Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow battling deadly ghost sailors, »


- Seth Kelley

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Cannes Awards: Controversial Swedish Satire ‘The Square’ Wins Palme d’Or

6 hours ago

Cannes — The 70th anniversary Cannes Film Festival has wrapped, culminating with an unconventional awards ceremony in which Pedro Almodóvar and his jury bestowed a couple unexpected bonus prizes, including a tie for screenplay and a special award to Nicole Kidman, who appeared in four projects in this year’s official selection, including competition titles “The Killing of a Sacred Deer” and “The Beguiled,” season two of “Top of the Lake” and special screening “How to Talk to Girls at Parties.”

Meanwhile, the fabled Palme d’Or went to Swedish director Ruben Östlund’s cutting art-world (and real-world) satire “The Square,” which dares to bring aspects of conceptual and performance art into the sphere of cinema. The choice came as something of a surprise, if only because the masterful, 142-minute film has divided audiences so far, and jury prizes rely on consensus.

Östlund’s follow-up to Un Certain Regard winner “Force Majeure, »


- Peter Debruge

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‘Beauty and the Beast’ Crosses $500 Million Milestone at Domestic Box Office

8 hours ago

Beauty and the Beast” just waltzed past a major box office milestone.

The live-action remake of Disney’s 1991 fairy tale crossed $500 million at the domestic box office after Saturday earnings were totaled, making it the eighth movie ever to do so.

Beauty and the Beast” has been a box office darling — and one of the few bright spots in 2017 — since it was released on March 17 and went on to a $174.8 million opening weekend.

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Overseas the film has been a hit as well, earning over $732 million. Its worldwide total sits at over $1.2 billion. It is currently the tenth highest grossing movie of all time behind “Frozen.”

Bill Condon directed the movie starring Emma Watson as Belle and Dan Stevens as the Beast. The strong supporting cast includes Luke Evans, Kevin Kline, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Audra McDonald, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Ian McKellen, Emma Thompson, »


- Seth Kelley

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Box Office: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Hooks No. 1, ‘Baywatch’ Belly Flops

8 hours ago

Disney’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” is sailing into first place at the domestic box office this weekend, but the story the numbers dictate is not one of swashbuckling heroics.

Johnny Depp’s fifth outing as Jack Sparrow is looking at a three-day total of $62.2 million from 4,276 locations, and a four-day holiday weekend sum of $77 million. If not for international appeal, that would be a let down for a movie riding on a $230 million production budget.

Related

Film Review: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

The first place finish also can’t cover up a serious case of franchise fatigue. “Dead Men Tell No Tales” is the lowest opening for a Pirates movie apart from the original, which earned over $46 million in its first weekend (and was also the only installation approved by critics). Last time out in 2011, “On Stranger Tides” pulled »


- Seth Kelley

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‘Fate of the Furious’ Crosses $1 Billion Milestone at International Box Office

8 hours ago

“Fate of the Furious” is a billionaire overseas.

The eighth installment of Universal’s Fast and Furious franchise crossed the $1 billion mark at the international box office on Sunday, becoming only the sixth film in history to do so.

This weekend the movie earned $3.3 million from 41 territories, pushing it past the $1 billion mark. Combined with its domestic sum of $222.5 million, the film’s worldwide total currently stands as the eleventh best of all time at $1.223 billion, as of Sunday.

In China alone, the movie has made $387.4 million, making it the highest grossing foreign film of all time there. Other top grossing territories are Brazil ($41.6 million); U.K. and Ireland ($37.4 million); Mexico ($36.8 million); and Germany ($32.1 million).

Related

‘Fast & Furious’ Films Ranked Worst to Best

“Fate” has been a box office titan since it opened on April 14, and went on to have the largest opening weekend of all time internationally ($443.2 million), and »


- Seth Kelley

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9 Thoughts on Cannes 2017

17 hours ago

The Cannes Film Festival played host to some good movies this year (there is never a year when it doesn’t), yet throughout the 12-day event, there has been a pervasive feeling, shared by critics and distributors and publicists and audiences alike, that the festival’s been having a soft year, that the magic was tamped down. It had something do with the lack of a universally agreed upon home run, like “Toni Erdmann” or “Amour” or “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” or “Breaking the Waves.” (There were a handful of doubles and triples, but more disputes than not about all of them.) It had something to do with the new security system (long, slow lines to get through metal detectors), which freighted the simple act of walking into a movie with a touch of that airport depression. For all that, Cannes is still Cannes: the most momentous film festival in the world. »


- Owen Gleiberman

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Cannes Film Review: ‘After the War’

22 hours ago

Italy’s “years of lead,” when the leftist Red Brigade and their right-wing counterparts instituted an unprecedented reign of terror, remain a sensitive subject for a nation more likely to nostalgize its troubled past than process it in any constructive way. While not an infrequent subject in Italian cinema (see Mimmo Calopresti’s “The Second Time,” Marco Bellocchio’s “Good Morning, Night”), the way it’s handled in Annarita Zambrano’s smart, affecting debut “After the War” adds a new note to the ongoing discussion, while marking its director as a serious talent to watch. Paralleling the lives of a former terrorist living in exile in France alongside those of the family he hasn’t seen for two decades, the film explores in an intimate manner the personal toll of violent political resistance. Targeted art-house play could follow probable festival success.

In 2002, France ended the “Mitterand podoctrine,” a policy that »


- Jay Weissberg

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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Intruder’

23 hours ago

With excellent Critics’ Week opener “Sicilian Ghost Story” and now Leonardo di Constanzo’s Directors’ Fortnight title “The Intruder,” the Cannes 2017 sidebars have launched a mini-trend of Italian movies that, in very different ways, go some distance toward redressing the imbalance in cinema’s treatment of mafia stories. These are not epic Greek tragedies of dynastic power and greed, but small, intimate tales that resist glamorizing the gangsters and their vicious code, and instead refocus on their victims. In “The Intruder,” a slice of sincere social realism set in a Naples community bedevilled by Camorra activity, there is a further twist of the knife being as so many of the victims are children, the offspring of young, hard-faced mothers and absent, murdered or jailed fathers.

In its central character, it also becomes a portrait of front-line, hard-edged compassion, and of just how very difficult it is to retain your principles »


- Jessica Kiang

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Box Office: ‘Pirates’ On Course for $275 Million Global Launch

27 May 2017 2:43 PM, PDT

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” is sailing its way to an easy domestic box office win this weekend, but it’s international numbers are on course to make an even bigger splash. The fifth film in the Disney franchise is expected to net $275 million globally this Memorial Day weekend after reeling in $110 million already through Friday.

The Johnny Depp vehicle … er … ship only made about $21 million domestically so far — when including Thursday night previews — which means the other $86 million came from abroad. China accounted for most of that money at $21.3 million. India and Vietnam were the only countries where “Pirates” didn’t debut at No. 1.

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‘Baywatch’ Producer Shares Plans for Film Sequel With Dwayne Johnson, Zac Efron (Exclusive)

A key factor in Disney’s projected digits is the fact that “Dead Men” is opening in a staggering 91 percent of the market at once. In Japan, »


- JD Knapp

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Cannes: Predicting This Year’s Palme d’Or Winner and Other Awards

27 May 2017 12:52 PM, PDT

It’s crunch time. All 19 competition films in this year’s Cannes Film Festival have been seen and scrutinized, and now jury president Pedro Almodovar — along with Jessica Chastain, Maren Ade, Will Smith, Agnes Jaoui, Park Chan-wook, Paolo Sorrentino, Fan Bingbing and Gabriel Yared — have the next day to argue amongst themselves over which title is most deserving of the Palme d’Or, among other prizes.

Every year, predicting the jury’s favorites is something of a fool’s errand, fraught with inconsistencies and unknowns: Who but the most gifted mind-reader, for example, can imagine how the Fresh Prince might groove to a Naomi Kawase film? Who foresaw last year’s jury shutting out critics’ darling “Toni Erdmann?” But it’s all in the game, so with a strict warning not to place any monetary bets on my say-so alone, here are my best guesses for tomorrow’s awards.

Palme D’Or: “A Gentle Creature, »


- Guy Lodge

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‘A Man of Integrity,’ ‘Wind River,’ ‘Barbara’ Take Un Certain Regard Awards at Cannes

27 May 2017 10:41 AM, PDT

Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof’s “A Man of Integrity” won the top prize in the Un Certain Regard section at the Cannes Film Festival this evening, beating a diverse international selection of 17 other titles to the honor. The award was presented by this year’s Un Certain Regard jury president Uma Thurman, heading a panel that also included filmmakers Joachim Lafosse and Mohamed Diab, actor Reda Kateb and Karlovy Vary festival director Karel Och.

Other prizewinners included U.S. writer-director Taylor Sheridan’s Sundance-premiered debut feature “Wind River” and actor-filmmaker Mathieu Amalric’s section opener “Barbara.”

More details to come in an update of this report. The full list of Un Certain Regard winners is as follows:

Un Certain Regard Award: “A Man of Integrity,” Mohammad Rasoulof

Best Director: Taylor Sheridan, “Wind River

Jury Prize: Michel Franco, “April’s Daughter

Jury Award for Performance: Jasmine Trinca, “Fortunata

Special Award for Poetry of Cinema: Mathieu Amalric, »


- Guy Lodge

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Box Office: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ Tells $75 Million Tale, ‘Baywatch’ Walks the Plank

27 May 2017 8:30 AM, PDT

Memorial Day weekend marks the opening for two summer blockbusters this year — “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” and “Baywatch” — but only one of the nautical-themed narratives is sailing away with a 4-day win. That’s because Disney’s “Pirates” is currently on course for a debut just under $75 million, while Paramount’s “Baywatch” is expected to drown at just $21 million by weekend’s end.

After taking in $5.5 million in Thursday night previews, the fifth installment of Johnny Depp’s swashbuckling franchise added another $16 million to its domestic gross from 4,276 theaters on Friday, giving it a total of just about $21 million so far. However, the Dwayne Johnson-Zac Efron reboot isn’t expected to make much more than that — even with Saturday and Sunday factored in. “Baywatch” netted $4.5 million from Wednesday and Thursday night previews alone, but only added another $5.5 million from 3,647 locations on Friday. That »


- JD Knapp

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Cannes Critics Prize ‘Bpm,’ ‘Closeness,’ ’Nothing Factory’

27 May 2017 7:30 AM, PDT

Cannes — Robin Campillo’s “Bpm (Beats Per Minute),” Kantemir Balagov’s “Closeness” and Pedro Pinho’s “The Nothing Factory” won International Critics’ Prizes Saturday afternoon at the Cannes Festival.

Awarded by the International Federation of Film Critics (Fipresci) one day before a international jury headed by Pedro Almodovar announces Cannes Festival’s 2017 Palme d’Or on May 28, the prizes do not always coincide with the official jury’s. “Toni Erdmann” won the Fipresci best competition player award last year, for instance, but nothing from Cannes’ official jury.

Over the last two years, however, Fipresci competition winners have won (“Son of Saul”) or been nominated (“Toni Erdmann”) for a foreign-language Academy Award and often proved standout art films of the year in sales and further award glory at or beyond Cannes.

The International Critics Prize for best film in competition marks further recognition for “Bpm (Beats Per Minute),” Campillo’s first »


- John Hopewell

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Based on a True Story’

27 May 2017 4:14 AM, PDT

It’s hard to talk about Roman Polanski’s “Based on a True Story” without revealing the twist, although it’s much harder trying to imagine anyone actually falling for it. A thin psychological two-hander between two writers, both of them women, this over-obvious metaphor for the creative process — never quite thrilling enough to qualify as a thriller, but still unsettling enough to intrigue — inevitably results in the publication of the book within the book upon which the film is based, and in so doing forces Polanski to return to his roots.

That doesn’t mean audiences will get much insight into either the director’s process or his own dark secrets, mind you. Rather, the film recalls the uncertain, almost hallucinatory quality of his early work — movies such as “Cul-de-Sac,” “Repulsion” and “Rosemary’s Baby,” where the very fabric of what we’ve been watching is called into question. »


- Peter Debruge

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Cannes: Roman Polanski Says Theaters and Netflix Are Bound to Co-Exist

27 May 2017 3:06 AM, PDT

Polish-French director Roman Polanski said Saturday that Netflix and other digital services “don’t pose a basic threat” to moviegoing.

“People want to go to the movies not because of better sound, projection, or seats, but because they want to participate in an experience with an audience around. This is as old as humanity — look at Greek theaters and Roman circus or concerts,” Polanski told reporters at the press conference for his latest film, “Based on a True Story,” which world premieres Saturday in Cannes.

“I remember, when Walkman or tape became popular, people said, ‘This is the end of concerts!’ and [today, concerts] draw crowds as big as 100,000 people,” said Polanski, who then joked that “it would be hard to see ‘Borat’ alone. You need to see it in cinema with a laughing audience.”

Related

Tilda Swinton Defends Netflix at Cannes: ‘We Didn’t Come Here for Awards’

Polanski explained that »


- Elsa Keslassy

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Cannes Talk: Producer Uri Singer of Passage Pictures

26 May 2017 11:56 PM, PDT

 

Producer Uri Singer launched Passage Pictures in 2016, taking its drama ‘Marjorie Primes,” starring Jon Hamm and Lois Smith,  to Sundance earlier this year. That film was picked up by FilmRise, which plan an awards push for Smith. Also in its slate: “I am Rose Fatou,” written by Ted Melfi (“Hidden Figures”), “Tesla,” which teams Singer up again with writer/director Michael Almereyda, and “Rich,” based on the book “King of Oil: The Secret Lives of Marc Rich,” about the infamous billionaire oil trader who died in 2013.

 

What’s different about Passage Pictures?

I decided I had to sit through movies and watch them and I decided they had to be important to bring to the screen — passion projects that can have a bigger audience, and important stories. Like “Experiementer,” and movies like “Marjorie Prime,” “White Noise,” and Nikola Tesla biopic “Tesla.” That’s a challenge I embrace.

How do you navigate the difficult specialty market? »


- Carole Horst

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