Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 26 items   « Prev | Next »


Todd Haynes on ‘Wonderstruck’: ‘It Is a Kids’ Movie’

54 minutes ago

Wonderstruck,” in competition at the Cannes Film Festival, is director Todd Haynes’ seventh feature film, his fourth with Julianne Moore, and his first for Amazon Studios, which backed it along with Roadside Attractions. The film is “weird, wild, and not like anything I can think of,” he tells Variety. It also turns out it’s a kids’ movie.

You’ve talked in Cannes about making something kids would love. Was that always the idea?

It is a kids’ movie, and that’s something I could never have conceived myself from scratch. I think [illustrated novel and screenplay writer] Brian Selznick has some strange line in to the idiosyncrasies of kids that shows them utter respect and is true.

In process of making this movie, by working with kids, working with deaf kids, showing cuts of the film to kids as we were making it, they taught me everything I needed to know about making this film. »


- Stewart Clarke

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Spider-Man’ Star Tom Holland to Play Young Nathan Drake in ‘Uncharted’ Movie Adaptation

1 hour ago

Spider-Man: Homecoming’s” Tom Holland will star in Sony’s adaptation of the popular video game “Uncharted.”

Shawn Levy came on board in October to direct “Uncharted,” based on the PlayStation video game series following the adventures of treasure hunter Nathan Drake. Holland will play a younger version of Drake. The film follows Drake’s first encounter with the professional rogue Sullivan.

The movie will be a co-production between Arad and Atlas Entertainment Production, and will be produced by Charles Roven, Alex Gartner, and Ari and Avi Arad.

Related

Tom Holland on ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming,’ Spinoffs and Planning for Bathroom Breaks

The video game series was developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony Computer Entertainment America.

Holland first portrayed Peter Parker in Disney-Marvel’s “Captain America: Civil War” a year ago. Jon Watts directed “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” which opens July 7, about Parker’s high school days.

Robert Downey Jr.’s Iron Man »


- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


Sony Sets ‘Angry Birds 2’ Movie for Landing in September, 2019

1 hour ago

Sony Pictures has set a Sept. 20, 2019, release date for “The Angry Birds Movie 2” — coinciding with the 10th anniversary of the hit videogame.

The studio announced Monday that it was re-teaming with Finland-based Rovio Entertainment Ltd. for the animated sequel. “Angry Birds” grossed a solid $350 million worldwide, including $107 million domestically. The film, directed by Fergal Reilly and Clay Kaytis, was set on an island populated entirely by happy, flightless birds – except for Red (voiced by Jason Sudeikis), speedy Chuck (Josh Gad), and Bomb (Danny McBride).

Rovio announced last August that it had launched development of a sequel but gave no details as to whether Sony would be involved again.

The Angry Birds Movie 2” will be directed by Thurop Van Orman, whose credits include “The Marvelous Misadventures of Flapjack” and “Adventure Time.” Van Orman recently worked at Disney and Sony Pictures Animation.

The film will be co-directed by John Rice (“King of the Hill, »


- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Star Wars’ Movies Push Overall Licensed Merchandise Sales to $262 Billion

1 hour ago

With “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” providing major boosts, global retail sales of licensed merchandise rose 4.4% to $262.9 billion last year, according to the Licensing Industry Merchandisers Assn.

The association issued the report Monday, a day ahead of the launch of the three-day Licensing Expo at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas.

The report did not break out any specific contribution from Disney’s first two “Star Wars” movies, but Marty Brochstein, senior VP of industry relations and information for Lima, said that the tie-ins from the tentpoles movie played a crucial role in boosting the overall numbers.

“You had the first full year of  ‘The Force Awakens,’ which Disney presented with an appealing combination of new and classic items,” Brochstein told Variety. “The ‘Rogue One’ merchandise appealed to a slightly older demographic and did very well.”

Disney made a major »


- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Brad Pitt in ‘War Machine’

2 hours ago

Everyone has a different idea of what’s funny, but it’s hard to imagine anyone being amused by “War Machine,” a colossally miscalculated satire about a U.S. general who thought he could “win” the war in Afghanistan at precisely the moment President Obama announced he would be pulling troops out of the country. A costly flop from Netflix’s newish “Originals” division, “War Machine” stars a cockeyed Brad Pitt — who spends the entire film with his left brow cartoonishly arched and his right eye squinched half-shut — in the sort of role that really ought to have gone to John Goodman, or some comparably gifted character actor.

But bless their hearts, the execs at Netflix still believe in stars, which is sort of a radical notion in an era when the old-school studios have consistently hyped visual effects ahead of the interchangeably handsome hunks selected to play Spartan warriors, »


- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’

4 hours ago

When Disney first announced plans to build a feature film out of its venerable Pirates of the Caribbean ride, there was little reason to expect anything more than a grab for quick cash and a few Disneyland cross-promotional opportunities. To just about everyone’s surprise, Gore Verbinski’s 2003 “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl” was an inspired piece of old-school popcorn entertainment; more clever, more fun, and fundamentally riskier than it had any right to be.

Now, 14 years and four films later, the “Pirates” franchise has finally delivered exactly what cynics had expected all along. Containing only the faintest traces of the spark that turned this once unpromising idea into a nearly four billion-dollar enterprise, Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg’s “Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” is a mercenary, visually unappealing exercise in brand maintenance. The franchise has lost a bit of »


- Andrew Barker

Permalink | Report a problem


Nicole Kidman on Her Diverse Cannes Roles: ‘I’m Totally Up for Taking Risks’

5 hours ago

Nicole Kidman said the fact she has four projects at the Cannes Film Festival is coincidence rather than design, and that she is on a mission to support new, risky film and TV.

“To have four projects here, that’s a confluence of events, not something I was aware would happen,” she said. “At this stage in my life I want to stay very bold and open, and try things and support filmmakers that I believe in.”

The Australian star was honoring her Cannes commitments Monday, for “The Killing Of A Sacred Deer.” She is also in town for “How To Talk To Girls At Parties,” “Beguiled,” and Jane Campion’s TV series “Top Of The Lake: China Girl.”

“I want to support people who are trying different things, or have a very unique filmmaking style, or who are first-time filmmakers who can’t get things made,” Kidman said. »


- Stewart Clarke

Permalink | Report a problem


Ted Sarandos Says Netflix Returning to Cannes Is ‘Less Attractive’ Under New Rule

5 hours ago

Returning to Cannes is “less attractive” for Netflix if its films must play out of competition under a new rule requiring all competition titles to have a theatrical release, Ted Sarandos said early Monday.

Netflix made a splash on the Croisette this year with two movies in the official competition, Bong Joon-Ho’s “Okja” and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories.” But outrage from French exhibitors and others over the selection prompted the festival to issue its new restriction on competition eligibility, effective next year.

Speaking to Variety at Netflix’s late-night bash in Cannes, Sarandos at first said “no” when asked whether the streaming giant would be willing to come back with its films relegated to out-of-competition. But he added quickly: “Well, I shouldn’t say that. It would be less attractive, for sure, because it would affect [Netflix’s] festival strategy around the world.”

Sarandos, the company’s chief content officer, »


- Elsa Keslassy

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Film Review: ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’

6 hours ago

In Nara Park, Japan, spotted deer were long believed to possess divine properties. To cause the death of one, even by accident, was a capital offense. Halfway across the world, in ancient Greece, King Agamemnon learned this the hard way, invoking the wrath of the gods for killing one of Artemis’ beloved deer, for which he was obliged to sacrifice his own daughter, Iphigenia. The obvious lesson: Don’t kill deer. But what if the deed is already done? That’s the premise of “Dogtooth” director Yorgos Lanthimos’ latest ruthless allegory, “The Killing of a Sacred Deer,” which has nothing at all to do with wildlife, holy or otherwise — although it does feature two key scenes in which a hunting rifle plays a critical role.

The title is a metaphor, as is the film’s central dramatic predicament (Lanthimos goes out of his way to make sure we understand that, »


- Peter Debruge

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: Cohen, Bassick, Rediu, Laundon Team For Teen Drama ‘Mondays’

6 hours ago

Cannes—New York-based Regal Entertainment, Vendian Entertainment CEO Michael Bassick, an executive producer aon Mel Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge” and Oliver Stone’s “Snowden,” and Michael Laundon, producer of Marcus Thompson’s “Shore Leave,” have joined efforts to co-produce “Tell Me Why I Don’t Like Mondays,” directed by editor-helmer Thompson (“A Place to Stay,” “Malevolence”), who also co-penned the screenplay alongside John Speer.

 Film fund Regal Entertainment is backed by American Israeli financier Adi Cohen and Catalan producer Jordi Rediu, whose credits include Jo Sol’s “Fake Orgasm,” Henning Carlsen’s “Memories of My Melancholy Whores.”

Taking its title from the Boomtown Rats’ song, “Mondays” is inspired by the first school shooting in California in 1979. Story explores the life and intimate thoughts of a teenager living in a Southern California suburb as reflected in her diaries. Motherless and pretty, Laura spends her time in consuming bourbon and drugs and skipping classes. »


- Emilio Mayorga

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes: The Match Factory Kicks Off Sales on ‘Sicilian Ghost Story’ (Exclusive)

11 hours ago

The Match Factory has kicked off sales on Fabio Grassadonia and Antonio Piazza’s “Sicilian Ghost Story,” which was the opening film of Critics’ Week in Cannes.

The sales company has sold the film to Altitude Film Entertainment in U.K./Ireland, Beijing Hugoeast Media Co. in China, Providence Filmes in Brazil, Cirko Film in Hungary, Danaos in Greece and As Fidalgo Film Distribution in Norway.

The film is the second feature from the writing-directing duo after their critically praised “Salvo,” which was awarded three prizes in Critics’ Week in 2013.

Sicilian Ghost Story” centers on the mysterious disappearance of Giuseppe, a 13-year-old boy. In contrast to the indifference of the people around her, Luna — a schoolmate who is in love with Giuseppe — is determined to find him. When it looks like his disappearance could be connected to the local Mafia, Luna turns against the local community and her own family. »


- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


Why ‘Dangal’s’ Triumph in China Could Be a Game-Changer For India

11 hours ago

Indian drama “Dangal” crossed the $100-million mark at the Chinese box office Saturday, becoming the biggest foreign-language film of all time in China and reshaping perceptions of the movie market in the world’s most populous nation.

The film opened May 5, going head to head with “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” and coming second to the Hollywood superhero movie in its first weekend. But as “Guardians” lost momentum, “Dangal” picked up speed and screens.

This week, its third on release and second at the top of the chart, “Dangal” overtook “Your Name,” the Japanese animated smash hit that scored $82 million (RMB566 million) in China last year. “Dangal,” with more than $113 million (RMB780 million,) has now made more in China than in India.

“‘Dangal’ tells us that an Indian film done well can not only release in China, but be the No. 1. ‘Dangal’ tells us that there is no glass ceiling, »


- Patrick Frater

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Festival, Argentina’s Incaa Re-Up on Ventana Sur Through 2020

12 hours ago

Cannes — Continuing its biggest overseas initiative outside its May event on France’s Riviera, the Cannes Festival has re-upped with Argentina’s National Film and Audiovisual Arts Institute (Incaa), for a further three editions of Ventana Sur, running over 2018-20.

A bold venture close to Cannes delegate general Thierry Fremaux’s heart, Ventana Sur was launched in 2009 by the Cannes Festival and Cannes Film Market on one hand and Argentina’s Incaa, its cornerstone film.TV funding agency, on the other.

Staged just after Thanksgiving in a delightfully early-Summer Buenos Aires, Ventana Sur aimed when launching to become a movie export market in Latin America for Latin America movies. Parallel to the market, Fremaux initiated a Cannes Festival Film Week in Buenos Aires which showcased key titles from May’s edition of the Cannes Festival.

Aimed at helping movies’ distribution in Argentina and Latin America, and presented with typical pizzazz by Fremaux, »


- John Hopewell

Permalink | Report a problem


Rudolph Herzog, Maurizio Braucci Projects Boost F&Me Slate (Exclusive)

12 hours ago

London-based production house Film and Music Entertainment has boosted its slate, including feature directing debuts from German documentarian and author Rudolph Herzog, and “Gomorrah” scribe Maurizio Braucci.

Braucci is teaming with the writer of the Oscar-winner “Ida,” Rebecca Lenkiewicz, on “The Dream Girl,” which will shoot in Italy in October. Francesco Virga at Mir is the Italian producer on the project. Post-production services will be by Windmill Lane, and the film will benefit from Ireland’s Section 481 tax credit.

Herzog, Werner Herzog’s son, is directing “How to Sell a War,” which is completing its financing. The intention is to begin shooting in Georgia later this year.

F&Me is continuing its relationship with Lenkiewicz on “The Disciple,” directed by “Koza” helmer Ivan Ostrochovsky, and written by Lenkiewicz, Marek Lescak and Ostrochovsky. The film looks at the role of the Catholic Church in Czechoslovakia following the 1968 invasion by Soviet troops. »


- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Jackson-Themed Egyptian Movie ‘Sheikh Jackson’ Picked Up by Media Luna (Exclusive)

12 hours ago

Media Luna has acquired the rights to Egyptian movie “Sheikh Jackson,” which centers on an Islamic cleric who revisits his teenage obsession with Michael Jackson.

The film, directed by Amr Salama, is set in 2009 when news of the singer’s death causes the cleric to undergo an identity crisis.

“We are proud to lead this young talented director to cross borders with such a delicate story, told with such an original tone and visionary in its way,” Ida Martins, CEO of Media Luna, said. “[The film] has the potential to touch the hearts of people no matter where they’re from as at the end of the day it is about being brave and learning how get to know and take care of oneself.”

The director said it is “a truly personal film” and “I don’t see myself doing another film where I can be that exposed and vulnerable telling a deeply personal story, »


- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


Scandinavian Filmmakers Grab Global Attention in Cannes and Beyond

12 hours ago

That Swedish director Ruben Ostlund’s anticipated art-world satire “The Square” is in competition this year is just latest indication that the Scandinavian industry is upping its international game, venturing beyond “Scandi noirs” and becoming a hotbed of innovation at the forefront of the pack in Europe.

The Square,” Ostlund’s English-language follow up to “Force Majeure,” which scooped Cannes’ Un Certain Regard Jury Prize in 2014, is the first Swedish film in the Cannes competition in 17 years. It stars Danish actor Claes Bang (“The Bridge”) and Elisabeth Moss, in a mighty mix of Nordic and U.S. talents that sees the already hot auteur “elevating himself into a new sphere,” according to Swedish Film Institute chief exec Anna Serner.

The same can be said for the entire film and TV industry in the Nordics, which comprises five countries: Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Finland and Norway.

There is a slew of buzzy »


- Nick Vivarelli

Permalink | Report a problem


Memento Clinches Raft of Pre-Sales on Catherine Deneuve Starrer ‘Claire Darling’ (Exclusive)

12 hours ago

Memento Films Intl. has clinched a raft of pre-sales on Julie Bertuccelli’s “Claire Darling,” a lighthearted drama with fantasy elements starring Catherine Deneuve and Chiara Mastroianni.

Memento has sold the project to Germany (Neue Visionen), Benelux (September Film), Switzerland (Frenetic), Austria (Filmladen), Greece (Seven), Israel (Lev) and Turkey (Fabula).

Adapted from Lynda Rutledge’s “Faith Bass Darling’s Last Garage Sale,” “Claire Darling” turns on a woman (Deneuve) who, convinced that she heard voices telling her that it’s her last day on Earth, decides to have a garage sale to get rid of all the objects she has collected. Each object stirs vivid memories that take her back in time in a series of flashbacks.

“Claire Darling” is being produced by Les Films du Poisson, the Paris-based company that has Eric Caravaca’s “Carré 35,” which is in the Cannes special screenings section. “Claire Darling” just started shooting. »


- Elsa Keslassy

Permalink | Report a problem


Dubai Goes To Cannes Places Accent on Female Arab Directors

13 hours ago

Five films by the new generation of directors from the Arab world — four of them women — will be unveiled on Monday (May 22) at Dubai goes to Cannes, the Cannes Film Market’s pix-in-post industry showcase. They are supported by the Dubai film market which is the only bona fide movie mart in the Middle East.

— Moroccan director Leila Kilani will present her sophomore feature “Joint Possession,” set on the hills around Tangier where rapacious real estate developers are tearing up the landscape and a family must decide whether to sell a large plot of land on which their old manor house lies. Kilani’s debut feature, “On the Edge,” about four girls from Tangiers who peel shrimps by day and turn tricks at night, screened in 2012 at the Cannes Directors’ Fortnight.

— Lebanese-American director Susan Youssef will present her sophomore work “Marjoun and the Flying Headscarf,” a coming-of-age drama about a »


- Nick Vivarelli

Permalink | Report a problem


Constantin Drives Into Tentpoles With ‘Monster Hunter,’ ‘Resident Evil’ Reboot (Exclusive)

13 hours ago

Constantin Film, producer of the $1.2 billion-grossing “Resident Evil” franchise, is driving into tentpole movie production with a “Resident Evil” reboot and “Monster Hunter.”

As with “Resident Evil,” “Monster Hunter” is based on a video game property from Japan’s Capcom. It will be directed by Paul W. S. Anderson and produced by Jeremy Bolt, the producer-director team behind “Resident Evil.” Constantin aims to bring “Monster Hunter” onto the market in late 2017 or early 2018, Constantin Film’s Martin Moszkowicz said at Cannes.

Details of the “Resident Evil” reboot are currently under wraps.

Also in the works is “Polar,” an adaptation of Victor Santos’ action noir graphic novels, to be directed by Sweden’s Jonas Akerlund, who is best known for music videos for Madonna, Beyonce, Taylor Swift and Lady Gaga.

At Cannes, Constantin will also bring onto the market, via Ralph Kamp’s Timeless Films, two Germany-originated movies: the $33 million-plus fantasy »


- John Hopewell

Permalink | Report a problem


Mohamed Diab Preps Palestine-Set Drama ‘Deja’ (Exclusive)

13 hours ago

Mohamed Diab, the critically-acclaimed Egyptian director of “Cairo 678” and “Clash,” is prepping “Deja,” a politically-charged film set in Palestine.

“Deja” is inspired by true stories of Palestinian prisoners who are serving long-term sentences in Israeli prisons and are smuggling sperm outside of jails to have children with their wives through artificial insemination.

The story follows a 17-year-old Palestinian girl, conceived through artificial insemination, who embarking on a journey to find her biological father who happens to live in Israel. “The voyage and her encounters with her father and family members will challenge her in every way and will shake her sense of identity,” Diab told Variety.

“Deja” will also chronicle the tumultuous love story between this young woman and a man of her age who is in prison.

Like “Cairo 678” and “Clash,” “Deja” will be anchored by a strong female protagonist “I love to depict Arab women and squash all the stereotypes. »


- Elsa Keslassy

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 26 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners