Week of   « Prev | Next »

9 articles


Jodie Foster and Darlene Hunt to Team Up on a Comedy About a Recovering Alcoholic

1 hour ago

If there's anyone out there who can mine humor from addiction recovery, it might well be Jodie Foster and Darlene Hunt.  Foster helmed the tonally challenging psychosis dramedy "The Beaver" and two sad-but-hilarious episodes of "Orange is the New Black," for which she was nominated for a DGA Award. (She was also nominated for directing "House of Cards.") As the creator of Showtime's "The Big C," Hunt told a story about terminal illness with deft but respectful levity. Now the two will collaborate on "Charlie," a comedy about a "self-destructive, emotionally-stunted alcoholic who vows to get her life on track after rescuing a dog she believes to be her reincarnated mother," per Deadline. Based on that logline, we're all in.  Hunt created "Charlie" at Sony TV. Foster is set to come aboard as executive producer and may shoot the pilot. The actress-turned-director is also currently working on the...

»


- Inkoo Kang

Permalink | Report a problem


In the Age of Auteur Television, What Does It Mean to Be a Director?

2 hours ago

The role of the director in television has, historically, always come second to the writer. In the words of Marcos Siega, director/executive producer of "The Following," there's a perception of them as "traffic cops." But in an era when television keeps getting better and better, there's a shift in that perspective, especially thanks to the influx of A-list directors like David Fincher and Steven Soderbergh.   Siega comes from the other side, having worked for over 10 years on shows including "Dexter" and "The Vampire Diaries," but he doesn't mind it when the feature guys come to play. At this year's ATVfest, Indiewire sat down with him to discuss what it can mean to be an "executive producer," what he feels he does as the lead director of a show and the valuable lessons he learned from being a guest director on "Veronica Mars." Talk to me a little bit about »


- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Dakota Johnson's Controversial Isis Spoof From 'Saturday Night Live'

2 hours ago

After courting a sort-of controversy with the sexytimes hit "Fifty Shades Of Grey," Dakota Johnson grabbed more headlines this weekend with her stint hosting "Saturday Night Live." And even with the show celebrating its fortieth year, they showed that they still know how to provoke. The internet erupted following a spoof of this Toyota ad, in which a father (Taran Killam) seems to be dropping off his high school graduate daughter (Johnson) at the airport before she leaves for college. Instead, she jumps into a jeep with a bunch of shifty Isis dudes. Aristocrats! Or, ha! Personally, I find it unfunny rather than offensive, and in defense of 'SNL,' with news of teenage girls in western countries becoming radicalized making headlines, it's a cheeky take on it. It's just not very good. But hey, see for yourself below.

»


- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'House of Cards' Season 3 Episode 1, 'Chapter 27,' Reverses the Twist

2 hours ago

[Editor's Note: These reviews are written without knowledge of what's to come, meaning, the author has not seen past the episode he's writing about.] Morning Briefing:Did you hear that rap? Much like when "Arrested Development" got the stair car to introduce its distributor before Season 4, "House of Cards" has incorporated its own spin to the Netflix logo, adding Frank's trademark knuckle rap to kick off each episode. Cute easter eggs aside, "Chapter 27" began with the newly inaugurated President making a ceremonial trip to his father's gravestone. Why? To piss on it — literally.  After Frank's tribute to his not-so-dear-Dad, we take a trip back in time with — surprise! — Doug Stamper, alive and not-so-well after last being seen face down in a ditch due to a brain-whacking by Rachel. Turns out he survived the brutal blows and has gone through a lengthy rehab regiment to make his way back to Frank's side...only to find out Frank isn't as eager to...

»


- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


Live Forever and Prosper: Leonard Nimoy, Rip

9 hours ago

Leonard Nimoy was many things. He was an actor, poet, director, photographer, philosopher, and singer. To most he was Spock, the half-Vulcan, half-human chief science officer of the USS Enterprise in the 23rd Century on several different iterations of Star Trek. Nimoy was even part of a plastic model kit from the 1970s, pointing his phaser at this three-headed snake-thing that never appeared in any episode of classic “Trek” that I can remember. The box for this model kit declares that Mr. Spock is “Star Trek’s most popular character,” and this is true.   Nimoy wrestled with being made into the kind of icon that begets action figures in his 1977 book I Am Not Spock, before throwing in the towel with his 1995 follow-up, I Am Spock. And Spock endured. He died in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), only to come back to life in Star Trek III: the Search for Spock »


- Bob Calhoun

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'The Walking Dead' Season 5, Episode 12, 'Remember': Welcome To The Family

13 hours ago

Previously: 'The Walking Dead' Season 5, Episode 11, 'The Distance': Hope Springs Eternal Whose Episode Is It? Rick's, primarily, although most of the major players have their moments, too. Even Tara and Noah get some lines! Not Eugene, though, who has apparently gone mute since the group re-unified. A Shred of Humanity Since "The Walking Dead" is survival horror, it only has so many cards it can play with its plotting before it starts repeating itself. So the writers really needed to make the most of their "The Ricketeers meet genuinely nice people" idea. The good news is that the episode succeeds admirably. This is possibly the best episode of the season so far, because it sets up so many intriguing possibilities for the future, while remaining entertaining and engaging on its own. The Ricketeers enter Alexandria, and it's exactly as Aaron promised, and then some. Turns out the community »


- Jeff Stone

Permalink | Report a problem


The "Adventure Time" Film May Be Too Little, Too Late

14 hours ago

Deadline says that Cartoon Network juggernaut Adventure Time is headed to the big screen. It's not the first series from the network for do so, but has the studio learned from the harsh lessons of 13 years ago? Despite a lowly start as a mere broadcast outlet for the hundreds of Hanna-Barbera shows that Ted Turner had acquired, Cartoon Network successfully managed to establish itself with innovative and exciting original content. Their first big hit was Craig McCracken's Powerpuff Girls, and it became the network's first bone fide phenomenon. Unfortunately the network was unprepared by the success they were suddenly saddled with, and they struggled to capitalise on the show's runaway fame. In the true spirit of a fad, the show's mainstream popularity came and went relatively quickly; but not before a feature film (The Powerpuff Girls Movie)  was produced and released in 2002. By then the show was definitely on »


- Charles Kenny

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'Downton Abbey' Season 5 Episode 9 Celebrates Christmas With Booze and Intrigue

15 hours ago

Previously: 'Downton Abbey' Season 5 Episode 8 Features Sex, Murder and Some Actual Plot Resolution Upstairs This week's Wtf line of dialogue comes, of course, from Violet, who asks Robert "Why do you always talk to me as if I were a salmon who laid eggs in the sand before swimming out to sea?" The first half of the episode revolves around a shooting weekend hosted by the Sinderbys, which appears to only be accessible via the Hogwarts Express. It's the first time the families have come together since the wedding, and in the name of familiarity Rose the Human Labrador asks if they can't all use Christian names, only for Lord Sinderby to point out that his name is nothing of the sort.  Rose brushes off his correction with the closest thing to irritation she seems capable of showing; it's another one of those moments where you can see »


- Kaite Welsh

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: 'Girls' Season 4, Episode 7, 'Ask Me My Name': Closure Might Be Coming

16 hours ago

Read More: Review: 'Girls' Season 4, Episode 6, 'Close Up': The Crew Comes Back Together Love her or hate her This week it's a trick question. Just when we think we're starting to love the new Hannah, who makes solid life choices and goes on dates with great guys like Fran, she jeopardizes it all by taking her date to Mimi-Rose's latest art show. Within seconds it becomes apparent that Hannah has been keeping tabs on Adam and his new girlfriend, and isn't as ready to move on as we previously hoped. The kicker is that we're led to believe that perhaps even Hannah herself didn't realize it, and that this journey was her trying to gain some strange sort of closure. Another cringe-worthy moment Rather than dealing with Adam in a quick, private moment and salvaging the night, Hannah opted to hash things out in front of her date, »


- Amber Dowling

Permalink | Report a problem


9 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners