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Archer Recap: Holy Shrink Snacks!

11 hours ago

The StoryWe're close to the end of Archer's sixth glorious season, but the show's not ending without something insane. In this first half of the season finale, Archer and the gang are tasked with saving a defected scientist. A brain blood clot is threatening Dr. Zoltan Kovacs's genius and life — important because the West needs not just his secrets, but his skills as well. The CIA devises a ridiculous plan to miniaturize everybody — excluding only Malory and Aj — and send them via submarine into the scientist's body to vanquish the clot. If Archer and Co. don't complete the mission, the CIA threatens to never give them freelance espionage assignments again. Dangerous mission aside, Lana and Archer also have the stress of worrying about their careers as parents.The Highlight ReelFrom the get-go, the CIA acknowledges that all these characters are very bad at doing their jobs. So the »


- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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Bloodline Recap: S.S.D.D.

11 hours ago

"I've never seen someone get hurt that bad." Remnants of the past converge with the present in "Part 7" to swallow Danny's ephemeral good nature. This episode shows a Danny capable of playing everybody from Kevin to Eric, manipulating SeaSea back into his clutches, and taking a desperate dive into the Big Bad Wolf's den of horrors. Here's the reckless black sheep everybody's been talking about. Has he been there all along, or is he the product of those callous, impenetrable family members around him? Danny embarked on a quest this episode, to seek out Eric's contact and land more illicit gasoline work. John and Marco's own pursuit for the traffickers bifurcated this story. Their actual searching revealed untied yarns coming closer to intersecting, but soul-searching on the home-front unveiled a family growing farther apart.I had trouble swallowing this episode. Not because it doesn't make sense; it does, and »


- Sean Fitz-Gerald

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Errol Morris on His Early Films, and What He Thinks of The Jinx

11 hours ago

This week sees the release of wonderful new Criterion editions of three of the greatest documentaries of all time: Errol Morris’s first three films, Gates of Heaven, Vernon, Florida, and The Thin Blue Line. Re-watching these films, it’s at times odd to think that the same man made them: Gates of Heaven is the deadpan, deliberate tale of pet cemeteries in California; Vernon, Florida is a weirdly meditative, austere portrait of the offbeat personalities in a rural southern town. And The Thin Blue Line, one of the most influential documentaries of all time, is a gripping investigation into a cop killing in Texas — complete with an evocatively tense Philip Glass score, stylized cinematography, and detailed, cinematic slow-motion reenactments. (The film was famously instrumental in the eventual release of Randall Dale Adams, who had been wrongfully convicted of the murder and condemned to die in the electric chair.) But »


- Bilge Ebiri

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The Red Road Refresher Course

12 hours ago

The Red Road is back. The gripping thriller follows a New Jersey local cop as he struggles to keep the peace between small town locals and a nearby Native American tribe. After a murder and cover-up drives a spike between the two worlds, an uneasy alliance is forged between the officer and a dangerous member of the tribe—but for deputy Harold Jensen, doing the right thing means putting his family in jeopardy. Take our refresher course to catch up on all the events, and then tune in to the season 2 premiere on April 2 10/9c on SundanceTV. »


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Movie Review: The Salt of the Earth Is a Look at Two Masters at Work

12 hours ago

When I was a kid in the 1980s, Wim Wenders and Sebastiao Salgado were two of the biggest Capital-a Artists in the world: Wenders, the German director who made stoic road movies full of existential longing and wide-open spaces, and whose films were issued in black VHS editions with a huge "Wenders" on the cover; Salgado, the Brazilian photographer who took images of suffering and labor and war and ruin and turned them into something sensuous and unreal, whose reproductions populated every middlebrow poster store. They had achieved what serious artists simultaneously dread and fantasize about: They had become brands. But there was a very real achievement beneath the commodification, too. Wenders’s cinematic despair was no less sincere for being fashionable, and Salgado’s willingness to go to the most treacherous places and work under the most intense conditions to get his shots came from a place of genuine »


- Bilge Ebiri

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Spooks: The Greater Good Trailer: Jon Snow Is Jack Bauer

13 hours ago

Were you a fan of Mi-5 before it was cruelly wrenched from Netflix? Then you might enjoy this trailer for its spinoff movie, Spooks: The Greater Good. (Mi-5 is called Spooks in the U.K.; it was renamed in America for obvious reasons.) It's got Peter Firth from the original series, plus Jon Snow and Jennifer Ehle to entice newcomers. Too bad the movie doesn't currently have a U.S. release date, but that will likely change as soon as they figure out exactly what to call it. »


- Nate Jones

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A Björk Song Almost Ended Up on Mad Men

13 hours ago

You wouldn’t think Björk would come up during a panel discussion about Mad Men, but that’s just what happened at the Film Independent at “Lacma: A Tribute to Mad Men,” when Matthew Weiner and Jon Hamm chatted about the season-five finale episode “The Phantom.” The episode ends with Nancy Sinatra’s “You Only Live Twice” playing over a gorgeous tracking shot.The song became a hit when the Nancy Sinatra version was used in the 1967 James Bond film of the same name. Weiner noted that he almost used Björk’s cover of the song in the season-one pilot, and when the audience laughed at this notion, he said, “You can laugh. It’s amazing.” Jon Hamm quickly jumped in: “Björk was originally going to be Peggy. You laugh — she’s amazing.”  Weiner explained why he waited to play the song in season five: We were listening to this all the time, »


- Diane Gordon

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Theater Review: The Radio City Music Hall New York Spring Spectacular Is Not for Us

14 hours ago

The largest Broadway houses have fewer than 2,000 seats; Radio City Music Hall has almost 6,000. So you might expect Radio City’s New York Spring Spectacular, a sticky amalgam of musical theater, corporate masturbation, and high-fructose corn syrup, to be about three times as bad as, say, Mamma Mia! But that would be to underestimate the awesome tackiness of Spring Spectacular, a show assembled largely to extend the Christmas Spectacular brand into a new seasonal niche. (Cue the hip-hop Easter bunny.) Broadway values, such as they are, are mere starting points in a venue that, spreading over 12 acres, resists subtle gestures; indeed, an earlier version of the show, with a book by Pulitzer Prize–winner Doug Wright, was yanked less than a week before it was scheduled to open last year, possibly because it bore too great a resemblance to actual theater. Astonishingly, the thing that opened last night is the »


- Jesse Green

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It Follows Spoiler Bomb: The Director Explains All Those Twists and Shocks

14 hours ago

It Follows has quickly become the horror hit of the year, expanding into over 1,200 theaters this weekend after weeks of rave reviews and sterling word of mouth in limited release. The premise is irresistible — after hooking up with her shady boyfriend, Jay (Maika Monroe) learns she will be stalked by a shape-shifting monster unless she passes her affliction on to someone else through sex (though if the monster then slays that person, it will return to hunting Jay). But even after seeing the movie, fans still had plenty of questions about what it all meant and how key sequences were conceived. Vulture recently called up It Follows writer-director David Robert Mitchell to explain himself, and perhaps shed light on some of the story's pivotal shocks. Be forewarned: The following interview includes massive end-of-movie Spoilers. Don't read it until you've watched the film! (And after this weekend, you'll have »


- Kyle Buchanan

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Sam Claflin on The Riot Club, Playing a Wanker, and His Pretty Woman Moment

14 hours ago

When The Riot Club debuted at the Toronto Film Festival last September, I predicted it would be your next favorite pretty-boys flick. Think The History Boys meets Skulls, but with satirical commentary on the English class system and a cast straight out of British GQ. Based on Laura Wade’s play Posh, the film follows a club of hedonistic wankers, including The Hunger GamesSam Claflin, Jupiter Ascending’s Douglas Booth, and The Host’s Max Irons. But no cast member has more to chew on than Claflin, whose character Alastair has spent his life living in the shadow of his older brother, and [spoiler] who actually stands on a table during a debauched formal dinner and makes a speech about how much he hates poor people. Claflin, for the record, grew up very much not posh in Ipswich, Suffolk. Vulture spoke to him by phone about playing the bad guy for once, »


- Jada Yuan

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Gillian Flynn Will Ensure That Steve McQueen’s New Film Has Four Cool Girls

15 hours ago

Gillian Flynn's already proven herself as a screenwriter, adapting her novel Gone Girl for David Fincher's film last year. Now the Hollywood Reporter is reporting she'll do the same for Lynda La Plante's British miniseres, Prime Suspect. Flynn has been tapped to adapt the miniseries for Steve McQueen's next film, Widows. It's familiar territory for Flynn: The story takes place after "four armed robbers are killed during a failed heist and their surviving widows join forces and resolve to pull off the raid themselves." No word yet on how cool these widows will be, but we're betting that if Flynn's involved, they'll be pretty damn sadistic. »


- Dee Lockett

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Movie Review: Home Has Silly Aliens But Real Emotions

15 hours ago

The new DreamWorks animated film Home is a surprisingly moving tale of friendship and family, dressed up as an adorably frivolous sci-fi comedy. It kicks off on a cute-creepy note, with our cuddly, barrel-shaped, space-alien protagonist Oh (Jim Parsons) introducing his kind: the Boov, a species of intergalactic cowards constantly on the run — usually from the nasty, planet-destroying Gorg, another alien race. "The Boov," Oh tells us, are the "best species ever at running away." He adds, in his patented diction: "I am very excitement to make a fresh start. We are all moving to the best planet ever for to hide in." That planet, in case you haven’t seen the trailers, is Earth. How exactly do they plan to deal with us humans? Easy. They turn off gravity, harvest us in giant bubbles, and send us all to Australia — turning the continent into a massive suburban prison »


- Bilge Ebiri

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Wim Wenders on Salt of the Earth and What Happened to Until the End of the World

16 hours ago

In the late 1970s and '80s, if you were into serious cinema, you had to be into Wim Wenders. The German director of Paris, Texas, Alice in the Cities, and Wings of Desire was the international poster-child for artful ennui and existential despair. But his films were also remarkable for the way they mixed a very continental brooding with a love of pop culture, usually American. That’s what made his films so brilliant, in a way — they were serious, but accessible. As evidenced by his triumphant recent MoMA retrospective, which screened brand-new restorations of his films, Wenders has proven to be a remarkably resilient and adaptable filmmaker over the years. He still makes narrative films, but he is now known as much for documentaries like The Buena Vista Social Club and Pina as he is for his earlier classics. This week sees the release of the Oscar-nominated Salt of the Earth, »


- Bilge Ebiri

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Noah Baumbach Shares His Musical Obsessions

17 hours ago

Sometimes the soundtrack to a Noah Baumbach movie can be more exciting than the film itself. He, like his contemporaries Sofia Coppola and Wes Anderson, is obsessive about making sure the music in his films carries the story. This is especially true of While We're Young, his new film about 40-somethings who realize the stuff of their childhood is now considered "vintage," starring Ben Stiller, Naomi Watts, Adam Driver, Amanda Seyfried, and Ad-Rock. The music in While We're Young is some of the most eclectic you'll hear on any Baumbach soundtrack, as it pits the old against the new — what was kind of lame then, but totally cool now. Baumbach reunited with LCD Soundsystem front man James Murphy to put the soundtrack together, and on an unseasonably cold spring day in New York, he told Vulture about the prized possessions in his personal collection, and what movie soundtrack makes him cry. »


- Lauretta Charlton

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Movie Review: Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart Can’t Save Get Hard’s Stale Jokes

17 hours ago

The new Will FerrellKevin Hart comedy Get Hard is designed to provoke you, and maybe even piss you off a little. Does it cross the line into actual racism, and/or homophobia, as some contend? Maybe. Probably. Everybody’s threshold for offense is different, and the movie flaunts its “edge” like it’s going out of style. But the real problem is that Get Hard’s very idea of edge is itself pretty stale. It feels like a bunch of off-color jokes the filmmakers have been trying to tell for years, and they’ve crammed them all into one film — with tiresome results.The setup is simple and symmetrical: James King (Ferrell), a soft, smug finance-industry hotshot, is arrested for fraud and embezzlement on the eve of his engagement party — right in the middle of a private concert by John Mayer. (The very game Mayer is hilarious in his cameo, »


- Bilge Ebiri

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Zayn Malik Gives His First Interview Post–One Direction, Breaks Even More Hearts

17 hours ago

It's been two days since Zayn Malik broke tween hearts worldwide when he announced his departure from One Direction. Hopefully, by now, some of the shock has worn off. But just in case it hasn't, Zayn's here to throw some more salt into everyone's wounds by giving his first interview post-split to the Sun, saying that he stands by his decision. "I feel like I’m doing what’s right, right by myself and right by the boys, so I feel good ... My main message is I did try to do something that I wasn’t happy doing for a while for the sake of, maybe, other people’s happiness, and that was mainly the fans, and, and I only ever tried to do it for the fans. And it was only ever for them, and basically I’m only upset because I feel like I may have let them »


- Dee Lockett

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Scandal Recap: Full Circle and Sweet Baby

18 hours ago

Rings and weddings should come with delight and commitment, but on this episode of Scandal they came with disorder and chaos. When these symbols of love and partnership are coupled with dishonesty, what you get are broken hearts. The fight to turn a ho into a househusband is real, and Cyrus Beene’s hired fiancé, Michael, is not behaving like the kept man he is. The press already has more than enough reasons to question the authenticity of the relationship between the White House chief of staff and the gigolo, so getting ahold of pics from Michael’s night of partying and tongue-lapping other men is a crisis. This is why Olivia forces Cyrus to pick a wedding date, since he’s already pushed it back four times. She also convinces Mellie to use her next press conference to show her support for gay marriage and Cyrus. Besides, she needs »

- Luvvie Ajayi

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The 6 Most Miraculous Things Scientology Has Ever Done (According to Scientologists)

18 hours ago

According to Alex Gibney's Going Clear, which airs on HBO Sunday night, the Church of Scientology is a vindictive, repressive cult responsible for decades of criminal harassment and abuse. But, as numerous Church members will tell you, that's just half of the story. The other half is the testimony of Scientology's devoted celebrity members, who credit the religion with extraordinary healing powers. Their stories are literally incredible! According to its adherents, Scientology can ... Cure dyslexia.Tom Cruise struggled with dyslexia throughout his childhood, and says he was "functionally illiterate" when he graduated high school. That changed in 1986, when Cruise discovered Study Tech, L. Ron Hubbard's educational method that emphasizes learning through physical representations of subjects. (Educators have called it "moronic," but "fairly harmless.") Cruise credits Study Tech with curing his dyslexia, and has since started the Hollywood Education Literacy Project to recruit others to the cause — of literacy! »


- Nate Jones

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The Life and Crimes of Robert Durst: A Timeline

20 hours ago

Manhattan real-estate scion Robert Durst has never been convicted of murder, but he's been suspected of many. Now, thanks to Durst's admission in the finale of HBO's The Jinx that he "killed them all" and his near-simultaneous arrest in New Orleans, the list of his suspected crimes seems to be growing by the week. Here's a timeline of all of Durst's alleged misdeeds — and unlike The Jinx, it's all in the correct order.1971Durst, the eldest son of a wealthy New York real-estate magnate, meets Kathie McCormack, a teenage dental hygienist who lives in one of his family's buildings. Their love affair is swift; after two dates, Durst invites Kathie to move to Vermont, where he owns and operates a health-food store. She accepts his offer. 1973At the insistence of his father, Durst moves back to New York to rejoin the family business. He takes Kathie with him, and the »


- Nate Jones

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Hungarian Thriller White God Is the New Gold Standard for Nature-Bites-Back Movies

21 hours ago

In the cunning, nimble Hungarian thriller White God, homeless city dogs are driven to the breaking point and turn on their human abusers. Coming from Eastern Europe, it’s the sort of film that gets labeled a parable (slaves versus masters, etc.) for added prestige, but I like it just fine as a B revenge movie with A-plus direction by Kornél Mundruczó and a cast of canines so personable that even when they tear out people’s throats you still want to take them home.The film has a pair of strong protagonists: a willful little trumpet player named Lili (Zsófia Psotta) who has to move in with her divorced dad, Daniel (Sándor Zsótér), for three months, and the soulful mutt she totes along, Hagen (played by brothers Bodie and Luke, a mix of Shar-Pei, Labrador, and hound), who turns out not to be welcome in her dad’s building. »


- David Edelstein

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