Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 178 items   « Prev | Next »


We Are Your Friends Has Very Few Friends and One of the Worst Openings in History

1 hour ago

Despite his chiseled chest and absurd abs and bionic biceps and generally jocular demeanor, Zac Efron didn't make many friends at the box office this weekend, as We Are Your Friends, also known as the Zac Efron DJ Movie, had the fourth-worst wide release opening in history. It made a piddling $1.8 million, which is worse than Eddie Murphy's notorious flop The Adventures of Pluto Nash. Maybe We Are Your Friends should go eat a can of worms. Meanwhile, Minions, a movie about little yellow creatures that babble unintelligibly, crossed the $1 billion mark worldwide. Straight Outta Compton took the top spot for the third straight week, making $13.2 million for a $134.1 million cume. The War Room [insert Dr. Strangelove joke here] came in second, making $11 million. Tom Cruise keeps clinging to the top five as Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation made another $8.3 million for a $170.3 million »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


The Second Mother Uses Little Moments of Humiliation to Open Our Eyes

2 hours ago

We’ve all heard of humiliation comedy, but is there such a thing as humiliation drama? The new Brazilian film The Second Mother certainly makes a case for it. (The film is Brazil’s official submission for the Academy Awards this year, and it probably has a strong chance at a nomination.) It follows Val (Regina Casé), a longtime maid for a posh Sao Paolo family. She’s a boisterous, loving woman who dotes over her boss’s teenage son, Fabinho (Michel Joelsas), doing everything from cleaning the overgrown kid’s ears to helping save his pot stash when his mother tries to throw it away. The laziness of privilege is everywhere, like a poison: When the languid, weak-kneed man of the house, Juan Carlos (Lourenco Mutarelli), wants a soda from the fridge at lunch, Val goes and gets it for him, even though it’s clearly just a few feet away. »


- Bilge Ebiri

Permalink | Report a problem


Netflix Is Losing a Lot of Popular Movies but Getting a Racist Adam Sandler Movie

3 hours ago

If you've been meaning to watch The Hunger Games on Netflix, you better do it now while you still have the chance. In a blog post Sunday, Netflix's Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos stated that Netflix isn't renewing its license with Epix, which means they'll be losing such popular films as Rocky, The Hunger Games, Transformers, etc. But don't worry, Sarandos assured readers: You'll soon be getting Adam Sandler's Ridiculous Six, which will surely make up for it. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


American Horror Story: Hotel Will Open With a Serial Killer Dinner Party and Hipsters

3 hours ago

If you feel a cadaverous, culinary hole in your heart where Hannibal used to be, American Horror Story will try to fill you up: The first hour of Hotel will feature a serial killer dinner party hosted by Aileen Wurnos (Lily Rabe), Entertainment Weekly reports. As Ryan Murphy puts it: "The biggest serial killers of all time all come to the hotel. Gacey. Aileen. John Lowe’s invited to a devil’s night dinner. He thinks someone is pulling a huge prank on him. It’s the biggest serial killers of all time in a room with him and he has to figure who is trying to make him lose his mind." There will also be a "hipster" couple who are "horrified they can’t get their artisanal cheese." Maybe Lady Gaga will show up in her meat outfit and make this a meat-dress and cheese party. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Kyle Jean-Baptiste, History-Making Actor of Les Mis, Dies in a Fall

5 hours ago

Kyle Jean-Baptiste, the first black actor (as well as the youngest actor) to portray Jean Valjean in the iconic Broadway musical Les Miserables, has died at 21. Police said he fell accidentally from the fourth-floor fire escape of his mother's apartment Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn. "The entire Les Misérables family is shocked and devastated by the sudden and tragic loss of Kyle, a remarkable young talent and tremendous person who made magic — and history — in his Broadway debut,” said the production on its official Facebook page.  Jean-Baptiste took the stage as Valjean just one month after joining the company. He was scheduled to leave the show on Sept. 6 to join the Broadway production of The Color Purple. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Brad Bird's The Iron Giant Is Coming Back to Theaters, Remastered, With New Scenes

7 hours ago

Director Brad Bird has put together a pretty [puts on sunglasses] incredible body of work so far, including two beloved Pixar films and the histrionically fun Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol. But before he was given mammoth budgets to make what are essentially live-action animated movies, Bird directed the gorgeous The Iron Giant, an animated movie with shades of Stand By Me and The Day the Earth Stood Still. Vin Diesel voices the Giant, giving a genuinely moving performance. (Diesel recently hinted that a sequel may one day happen, but nothing substantial has surfaced yet.) Though lovingly made and impeccably animated (a mix of computer and tradition animation), the film sunk like a heap of scrap in the sea, earning $31 million on a $70 million budget. Now the movie is being rereleased in theaters, remastered and with two new scenes in a "Signature Edition." It'll hit theaters for two »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Queen of Earth Mingles Genres and Captures the Details of a Corrosive Friendship

7 hours ago

It is very hard to discuss Alex Ross Perry’s Queen of Earth without first talking about its opening scene. In tight close-up, Catherine (Elisabeth Moss), her eyes and cheeks dark pools of running mascara, cries, begs, and hurls accusations as her boyfriend James (Kentucker Audley) breaks up with her. The camera stays close on her throughout, with brief cut-aways to the creepily calm James; the calmer he is, the more agitated she becomes. We may not see any blood on the screen, but, emotionally speaking, this might be the most violent scene of any film so far this year.And that opening sets the tone well for the remainder of Perry’s film. We don’t ever see Catherine at such heightened levels of obvious despair again. But the agony, the paranoia, the sheer existential terror of grief becomes sublimated into the very style of the film. Queen of Earth »


- Bilge Ebiri

Permalink | Report a problem


Bryan Fuller on That Hannibal Finale and the Show’s Campy, Sensual Undertones

17 hours ago

Spoilers ahead for the season three finale of Hannibal. Hannibal fans: It’s all over, but what a ride we had. NBC declined to renew the show for another season, making the third season finale in effect a series finale — at least for now. Like Sherlock Holmes tumbling off of Reichenbach Falls only to return, Hannibal may very well live to eat again. Still, the finale provided an intensely satisfying end to one of the most improbable shows on broadcast television, with a grisly, gorgeously orchestrated murder, coinciding as the culmination of one of the most unconventional love stories between two men. We spoke with Hannibal’s creator Bryan Fuller about the finale — he spoke of the blue balls suffered, the camp genius of Gillian Anderson (Dr. Bedelia Du Maurier), and how we might see Hannibal return.Had you planned on that ending from the beginning? We knew we were »


- E. Alex Jung

Permalink | Report a problem


Hannibal Finale Recap: It’s Beautiful

20 hours ago

“What have we given? My friend, blood shaking my heart The awful daring of a moment's surrender Which an age of prudence can never retract By this, and this only, we have existed.”  T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land A heap of broken images. This is Hannibal's design: “Do you know where you are in the room?” Francis asks Reba. She does. “Then you know where you are in the house.” She does. “Then you know where the front door is, don’t you?” She does. He instructs her to feel his chest — no, not what she’s thinking, just touch it. Put her hands up to his throat (“Careful”) and take the key dangling around him. He needs to know if he can trust her. He sends her to the front door, advising her not to run. “I can catch you.” She makes her way downstairs, to the door. She pauses, »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


You Can Rent Big Pink, the House Where Bob Dylan Recorded The Basement Tapes

29 August 2015 2:01 PM, PDT

In 1967, during his period of convalescence, Bob Dylan and the band that would eventually become the Band recorded more than 100 tracks in an upstate New York house now known as the Big Pink. Dylan & Co. would whittle those tracks down to his seminal 1975 double LP The Basement Tapes, an album essentially written and recorded in a pink-hued void, cut off from modern pop music. You can now rent that void for the low price of $650 a night, for a minimum of two nights. The house currently has a perfect five-star rating, based on five reviews. Sadly, the posting says "the basement is not included in the rental," but a futon is, so if you ever wanted to write an album called The Futon Tapes, now’s your chance. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


The Cast for Lee Daniels’s Richard Pryor Movie Is Comically Good

29 August 2015 1:38 PM, PDT

The Richard Pryor biopic has been gestating for a long time. Director of 48 Hours Walter Hill was set to co-write and direct the movie back in 2005, when Pryor was still alive. Mike Epps gave a killer audition and won Pryor's approval. Pryor died shortly thereafter, and the movie went stagnant. Then Epps was supposed to play Pryor in a Nina Simone biopic that's had so many problems it might as well be cursed. Now the Pryor film has finally been green-lit, Deadline reports. Lee Daniels is at the helm, filming a script by Bill Condon and Empire collaborator Danny Strong. The cast is stellar: Oprah Winfrey will play Pryor’s grandmother, Eddie Murphy Pryor’s father, and Kate Hudson Pryor’s widow. Pryor, the man who once said, “I’m not a movie star, I’m a booty star,” will still be portrayed by Epps, ten years after he initially won the role. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Twitter Teaches Angry Actor James Woods the Meaning of Hyperbole

29 August 2015 10:58 AM, PDT

Last month, actor and sometimes political pundit James Woods filed a $10 million defamation lawsuit against Twitter user "Abe List" for tweeting that Woods used cocaine. Woods says he wants to send a message to "anyone else using social media to propagate lies." Woods's attorneys then followed up with a subpoena to Twitter demanding that it reveal the secret identity of "Abe List" as well as another Twitter user with the handle "T.G. Emerson," who went a step further, calling Woods a "notorious coke fiend and registered sex offender." Now Twitter's attorney, Ryan Mrazik, has written a letter in which he explains to Woods what hyperbole is:"The speech at issue appears to be opinion and hyperbole rather than a statement of fact. Further, the target of the speech is a public figure who purposefully injects himself into public controversies, and there has been no showing of actual malice. Attempts »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Russia Kills Its Only Lgbt Film Festival

29 August 2015 10:41 AM, PDT

A few months ago, Louis C.K. told a story about the time he went to Russia and he hated it. It's hard to blame him, considering the Russian government's lousy stances on many social and equality issues, and now Russia has taken another step backward: Moscow Premiere, a charitable film festival and the only festival in Russia to champion films by members of the Lgbt community, has been canceled. Citing economic hardship, Moscow's culture committee pulled funding as the festival was about to begin its 13th year. It will be replaced by a "positive, youth-orientated" festival called the Youth Festival of Life Affirming Film, which enlightens Russia's youth by prohibiting people under 18 years of age from watching movies that depict homosexuality in any way. Moscow Premiere head, film critic Vyacheslav Shmyrov, told Russian newspaper Noviye Izvestia, “We cannot affiliate to the new festival — not least in terms of our self-esteem. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Apple Tries to Block Tidal’s Stream of Drake’s Charity Performance, Fails

29 August 2015 9:11 AM, PDT

Drake closed out Lil Wayne's Lil WeezyAna Festival last night, which, as the portmanteau in the name implies, took place in New Orleans. It was a charity concert to benefit kids affected by Hurricane Katrina, and the whole concert was streamed via Tidal. But when Drake took the stage, rotten Apple intervened and the video went dead, following the company's threat of a $20 million lawsuit if Drake's two-song performance streamed on Tidal's rival music service. As "Page Six" reports, lawyers were called in because Drake has an exclusive deal with Apple Music said to be worth up to $19 million. Drake ultimately prevailed, however, and you can now stream his performance below, or watch the whole concert via Mr. World Premiere. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Quentin Tarantino and Kevin Smith on Movies, Porn, and Working in Video Stores in the 1980s

29 August 2015 7:05 AM, PDT

In Tom Roston's upcoming book I Lost It at the Video Store (a play on Pauline Kael's classic I Lost It at the Movies), a gaggle of filmmakers share stories of their lives as video-store clerks. It should come as no surprise that the two most quotable participants are over-caffeinated movie buff Quentin Tarantino and comic connoisseur Kevin Smith. Check out a few tidbits from the upcoming book, via Entertainment Weekly, below. (Then take our Tarantino Superfan Quiz and see how well you know the filmmaker.)Quentin Tarantino: I found Video Archives in Manhattan Beach and I thought it was the coolest place I had ever seen in my life. [In 1985] the owner asked if I wanted to have a job there. He didn’t realize he was saving my life. And for three years, it was really great. The case could be made that it was really too terrific. »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Do Yourself the Courtesy of Escaping No Escape

28 August 2015 3:16 PM, PDT

There’s a danger to playing up the cruddy No Escape’s exploitative qualities; it might inspire people to actually see it, merely to bask in the provocation. But no, it’s just plain offensive — and not all that well made, either. No Escape takes the casual xenophobia of something like Taken, crossbreeds it with something altogether more noxious, then asks us to kick back and enjoy the ride. We don’t. We can’t. And the ride isn’t that great to begin with.Set in an unnamed, mostly nondescript country that mixes elements of Thailand, Cambodia, and Laos, No Escape follows the Dwyer family as they relocate from the U.S. to Southeast Asia so dad Jack (Owen Wilson) can work for a big, Western water concern that has bought his own smaller company. It’s a big change for mom Annie (Lake Bell) and their two daughters »


- Bilge Ebiri

Permalink | Report a problem


Steve Carrel Is Replacing Bruce Willis in Woody Allen’s New Movie

28 August 2015 3:15 PM, PDT

Bruce Willis recently departed Woody Allen's new film, currently in production, purportedly because of his commitment to his role in the Broadway adaptation of Stephen King's Misery. (This remains a pretty unconvincing explanation.) Regardless, Variety reports that Allen has found a replacement for Willis in the form of Steve Carrel, who is nothing at all like Willis, who is nothing at all like Woody Allen. Though details regarding Allen's untitled film are scarce, we can now safely assume that it won't be an action movie, or Carrel will be the hairiest action star since Chuck Norris.  »


- Greg Cwik

Permalink | Report a problem


Pour a Glass of Chianti for This Supercut of the 3 Portrayals of Hannibal and Will’s Relationship and Because It’s Friday

28 August 2015 2:55 PM, PDT

As Hannibal closes out its run on NBC tomorrow night, it also puts the six-episode Red Dragon arc to rest. The story line comes from Thomas Harris's novel Red Dragon, where FBI agent Will Graham tries to catch the serial killer by enlisting the help of another — one Dr. Hannibal Lecter. With Bryan Fuller's interpretation, there have now been three major screen adaptations of the book, including Michael Mann's Manhunter and Brett Ratner's Red Dragon. In the former, William Petersen and Brian Cox play Will and Hannibal, and in the latter, it's Edward Norton and Anthony Hopkins. Video editor Matthew Morettini found that the dialogue in each one remained remarkably faithful to Harris's book, which allowed him to seamlessly re-create the scene where Will first approaches Dr. Lecter to ask for his help. The edit is remarkable, and it allows you to see the distinct variations in each interpretation. »


- E. Alex Jung

Permalink | Report a problem


Z for Zachariah Takes a Thrilling, Intimate Approach to Dystopia

28 August 2015 2:45 PM, PDT

Face it, the Earth in its present form is surely doomed because of climate change or terrorists with nukes or unstoppable viruses or some combination of the above. Pick your poison, folks. But the flood of post-apocalyptic films doesn’t seem to be helping us change our ways. As Brad Bird’s messed-up but underestimated Tomorrowland argued, moviegoers have become positively turned on by visions of the planet’s demise. Culturally, we have learned to stop worrying and love the bomb.Even if you’re sick of end-of-the-world films, though, you might make an exception for Z for Zachariah, a delicately calibrated, pointedly unsensational triangle drama anchored by Chiwetel Ejiofor in a frighteningly complex performance. Adapted by Nissar Modi from Robert C. O'Brien’s widely read Ya novel (before we called them Ya novels), director Craig Zobel’s movie is psychologically richer than its source. It’s set a long »


- David Edelstein

Permalink | Report a problem


The Weeknd Overreaches for Pop Grandeur on Beauty Behind the Madness

28 August 2015 1:55 PM, PDT

In his new video for “Tell Your Friends,” Abel Tesfaye — better known as the Weeknd — buries a man alive against a desert horizon at dusk. As he finishes the job and strides through the desolate landscape in step with the song’s slurry, slow-motion pace (“Tell Your Friends” sounds, somehow, like if “Benny and the Jets” were a Drake song), the camera looks up at him from his feet, like he’s a larger-than-life antihero in a John Ford movie. At some point, another person approaches; Tesfaye draws his gun without effort and shoots them down. The video offers no narrative explanation as to why he does this — I guess we’re supposed to assume that he’s the kind of guy who’d shoot a man in Reno just to watch him die. “This ain’t the right time for you to fall in love with me,” Tesfaye will »


- Lindsay Zoladz

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 178 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners