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First Look: Jake Gyllenhaal Is Ripped In Boxing Pic ‘Southpaw’

6 hours ago

Welcome to the The Gyllenaissance. As we documented in our feature 5 Recent Roles That Have Re-Established Jake Gyllenhaal's Career, the young actor has been blazing a path of late of complex roles in equally complex films. "End Of Watch," "Prisoners," "Enemy," and this fall's "Nightcrawler" couldn't be more different from each other, with Gyllenhaal flexing exciting new acting muscles each time out. And now he's going to flex some actual muscle for his next flick. From the gaunt, scarecrow frame of his current turn in "Nightcrawler," Gyllenhaal has bulked up considerably for his role in the boxing flick "Southpaw," as this first look reveals. Directed by Antoine Fuqua, and co-starring Rachel McAdams, Forest Whitaker, and more, the story chronicles the rise of a lefty welterweight all the way to a championship title as he battles various tragedies in his personal life, and wins back the love of his »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Review: Middle Of The Road Mini-Series 'The Tower' Struggles With Melodramatic Clichés

9 hours ago

Most films about The German Democratic Republic, commonly known as East Germany, tend to be in the spy thriller variety. This makes sense, since bureaucratic backstabbing and political paranoia were more readily available than food and water behind The Iron Curtain during its heyday. Masterful genre-bending works like 1965’s immensely influential John le Carré adaptation “The Spy Who Came in from the Cold” and 2006’s Best Foreign Language Film Oscar winner “The Lives of Others” took full advantage of a bleak society where even the most close-knit families couldn’t fully trust one another in order to create truly immersive and unpredictable mysteries. Based on Uwe Tellkamp’s novel “The Tower: Tales from a Vanished Land”, a positively reviewed best seller in Germany, “The Tower” is a two-part mini-series that attempts to bring an original angle to a story about The Gdp. By electing to present a drama instead »

- Oktay Ege Kozak

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NYC Doc Review: Laura Nix’s Activism & Pranksterism Doc ‘The Yes Men Are Revolting’ Also Has A Personal Touch

9 hours ago

Over the last twenty years, culture-jamming hoaxsters “Mike Bonanno" and "Andy Bichlbaum" (their pseudonyms) aka The Yes Men — a duo of activist pranksters and revolutionaries — have hijacked the mainstream media to bring attention to various cases of eco-social importance. Their list of accolades is long and storied. Formed in the early 1990s, and targeting the insidiousness of corporate malfeasance, the Yes Man have punk’d and hoodwinked Haliburton, Dow Chemical, ExxonMobil, McDonalds, The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Shell Oli, Hud, and many, many other corporations and organizations. Generally their agitprop modus operandi is impersonating entities from these corporations and calling their own press conferences, or scamming themselves onto TV and proclaiming a shocking about face in corporate agenda. At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in 2009 they falsified a statement by Environment Canada promising to cut carbon emissions by 40% below 1990 »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Review: 'Paddington' Starring Ben Whishaw, Nicole Kidman, Hugh Bonneville & Sally Hawkins

10 hours ago

First arriving courtesy of creator Michael Bond in 1958, Paddington Bear -- a small furry thing in a duffel coat and a red hat with a fondness for marmalade sandwiches -- has been beloved of generations of British children in book form. As such, you'd be forgiven for being cautious of his first big-screen adventure. Would this be a live-action/CGI travesty to match other recent examples like "Garfield" or "Marmaduke"? Or follow U.K. disasters like "Thunderbirds" and "Postman Pat" in irrevocably damaging childhood icons? After all, there's been reason to be concerned: initial clips and trailers spawned the "Creepy Paddington" meme, and initial voice star Colin Firth stepped away from the project only a few months ahead of the film's release. But have no fear — in the hands of "Harry Potter" and "Gravity" producer director David Heyman, and writer/director Paul King, "Paddington" is totally »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Exclusive: Clip From 'Before I Disappear' Has A Lot Of Questions

11 hours ago

This year, Damien Chazelle took his award winning short film "Whiplash" and turned it into an acclaimed, awards contending feature length movie. And that's the same path Shawn Christensen has taken with "Before I Disappear." His 2012 short "Curfew" took home an Academy Award, and now he's arrived two years later with the full length version of that tale and today we have an exclusive clip. Starring Christensen himself, along with Ron Perlman, Emmy Rossum, and Fatima Ptacek, the story follows Richie, a depressed and suicidal young man, who suddenly is thrust into caring for his young niece, Sophia. And so begins their time together and a journey through Manhattan, though it isn't always smooth sailing. As you'll see in this scene, Sophia wants to know as much as possible about the man who's looking after her, much to Richie's chagrin. "Before I Disappear" is on VOD today and now playing in limited release. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Feel Every Punch In 6-Minute Action Supercut For 'The Raid 2: Berandal'

12 hours ago

Gareth Evans' "The Raid 2: Berandal" runs 150 minutes long. And for some people, that can be a lengthy sit, and maybe they just want to get to the good stuff as fast as possible. Well, if you've already seen the action packed sequel and are looking to reduce your time on a rewatch, or if you haven't seen it and don't anticipate two hours plus of couch time, perhaps this supercut will help. Running six minutes long, you'll have to endure a pretty awful dubstep song (is this what the kids listen to these days?), but you'll be served with a blitzkrieg of action from Evans' film. Throat stabbings, groin punches, chest kicks, car chase gun fights and more await. It's a like syringe of steroids straight into your goddamn eyeballs, so wake up from the turkey coma and watch below. [35Mm] »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Vintage 25-Minute Doc 'Batman: The Making Of A Hero' About Tim Burton's Film

13 hours ago

When Ben Affleck shows up in "Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice" as the Caped Crusader, it will be nothing short of an event. But 25 years ago, it was just as a big deal — if not more — when Tim Burton's "Batman" was gearing up to hit the big screen. Back then, the director's take on the comic book was seen as "dark" (at least compared to the campier incarnations) and the world was waiting to see Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson tangle. But how was the movie put together? Well, this vintage documentary will help. Running 25 minutes long — and still unavailable on home video — this UK production is hosted by Robert Wuhl (who plays Alexander Knox in the film), and features Burton, designer Anton Furst, Michael Keaton, Kim Basinger, producer Jon Peters, Bob Kane, and more talking about the making of the movie. Everything, the from power of the »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Listen: Eddie Redmayne Describes His "Catastrophically Bad" Audition For 'Star Wars 7'

13 hours ago

Today the force is with fans around the world with the first trailer arriving for "Star Wars: Episode VII — The Force Awakens." And the J.J. Abrams directed sequel brings with it an entirely new cast to join the old school heroes for the next adventure in the saga. As you'll probably remember, no shortage of names were rumored for the movie as casting got underway, and it's likely many of those folks got phone calls to read for the movie. But for Eddie Redmayne, things didn't go well. Recently stopping by the podcast Happy Sad Confused, the actor shared how things went pear shaped when he stepped in to audition for the movie. “Recently my ‘Star Wars’ audition was pretty catastrophically bad. There’s this wonderful casting director called Nina Gold, who I absolutely love,” Redmayne shared. “I went in and did this scene, and after seven times of trying to play… »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Richard Linklater's 'Boyhood' Tops Sight & Sound's 20 Best Films Of 2014

13 hours ago

On Monday, the New York Film Critics Circle will their annual awards, launching the Oscar season into high gear. Other critics groups will soon follow and December will be filled with no shortage of lists and accumulated opinions on what was cinema's finest offerings in 2014. But overseas, Sight & Sound has got the jump on everyone, with the release today of their top twenty films of the year. To be certain, this has pretty much little bearing on any awards season talk, and it should be noted that many films that opened stateside last year, only debuted abroad in '14 (hence the inclusion of Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf Of Wall Street"). But culled from the top five lists of 50 critics, it does give a very good indication of what films connected in a big way over the last twelve months, and top of the heap is Richard Linklater's "Boyhood. »


- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: The Galaxy Is Disturbed In The First Trailer For 'Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens'

14 hours ago

Alright, it’s finally here. It’s been debated about as premiering in from of “The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies” and Disney’s “Into The Woods,” but Disney/LucasFilm decided to go their own way and debut the first brief teaser trailer for “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in theaters first, perhaps as a way to encourage audiences to actually attend one. Lucky for us they also decided to release it online. And it’s pretty short. Just under a minute long, the J.J. Abrams-directed film’s trailer shows each of the lead characters ever so briefly and fades to black and it also gives a quick tease of the Millennium Falcon which will surely produce nerd-boners for some. And of course, this trailer is scored to the classic solemn “Force Theme” by John Williams which honestly gives one chills. And we’ve always said »

- Edward Davis

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Watch: Jason Statham & Sofía Vergara Star In The First Trailer For Simon West’s Gambling Thriller ‘Wild Card’

14 hours ago

Simon West’s directing career started promisingly with the wicked action pleasure that is “Con Air,” but 15 directing credits later (many of them in TV), the filmmaker hasn’t really come close to matching those heights. But his latest film, “Wild Card” sounds at least promising. It’s remake of “Heat,” book and screenplay written by the great William Goldman (“All The President’s Men”), not to be confused with anything Michael Mann ever made. "Heat" was a 1986 action-thriller starring Burt Reynolds, but the production was botched and more than one director worked on the picture (Goldman contends the it was half a dozen helmers). “[It was] one of my major disasters... [there were an] amazing number of directors who worked on the flick,” he wrote in the book “William Goldman: Five Screenplays with Essays.” “There were six in all and yes that is a record, and like Dimaggio's batting streak, one that will never be broken. »

- Edward Davis

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Watch: Rare 1967 Trailer For Stanley Kubrick's '2001: A Space Odyssey' With Douglas Trumbull Test Footage

15 hours ago

This weekend, the first teaser for "Star Wars: Epiosde VII — The Force Awakens" arrives in theaters, more than a year ahead of its release date. And while it might seem like a contemporary phenomenon for trailers to drop an almost absurdly long time before the movie its promoting actually arrives, it's not unprecedented.  Back in 1967, the train started rolling on the campaign for Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey," but here's the thing: filming with the actors only wrapped that September, and the numerous effects shot in the film took nearly two years to complete, finished in 1968, a month before the movie opened. So what could be used for marketing material?  Well, as you'll witness in this vintage trailer, Douglas Trumbull's test footage and some voiceover do the heavy lifting. You'll see an incomplete version of what Bowman sees when he leaves the Discovery One in the »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 'Prestige' Author Says Christopher Nolan Wants To Be Stanley Kubrick, Disses Dark Knight Films

15 hours ago

With Christopher Nolan's "Interstellar" now in cinemas, it has prompted many to look back and assess (or re-assess) the director's body of work so far (check out our ranking of his films right here). And while critics and audiences have had their say, there hasn't been much word from others touched by Nolan's moviemaking, but in what is sure to spur talk all over again, "The Prestige" author Christopher Priest has candidly weighed in on Nolan's filmography in a recent chat with Skript. Priest discusses the genesis of Nolan's adaptation of his book, noting that Sam Mendes, coming off "American Beauty," had circled it first, but that the author believed instead in supporting rising talent. And his gamble paid off, with the author declaring "The Prestige," along with "Memento," as Nolan's finest films. But when it gets to the Batman movies, Priest doesn't hold back. "It's a wrong move »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Epic Thanksgiving Trailer For Ridley Scott's 'Exodus: Gods And Kings'

27 November 2014 4:45 PM, PST

Well, Ridley Scott gave folks something to talk about over the Thanksgiving table this holiday with his recents comments on the controversial casting of his upcoming "Exodus: Gods And Kings." “I can’t mount a film of this budget, where I have to rely on tax rebates in Spain, and say that my lead actor is Mohammad so-and-so from such-and-such,” the director said. “I’m just not going to get it financed. So the question doesn’t even come up.” But what does he leading man, Christian Bale, think of the issue? "Ridley's point, which I think is a good one, is what does an Egyptian look like?" the actor told Et last week. "Especially at that time when this was the empire, so it would be a crossroads of Europe and the Middle East and Africa, and he cast accordingly. I don't know the fact that I was born »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 1.5 Hours Of Paul Thomas Anderson's ‘Inherent Vice’ Interviews, Plus Check Out The Groovy New Poster

27 November 2014 8:25 AM, PST

Happy Thanksgiving! Not much else to say here other than Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Inherent Vice” is pretty great and has sticky resonance in the brain like high-quality resin (read our review here). So here’s a little treat if you’re looking for something to do over the Thanksgiving day holidays: here’s an hour and a half of interviews with Josh Brolin, breakout actress Katherine Waterston discussing the psychedelic grooviness of PTA's funny, melancholy and surreal gumshoe mystery tale. "I don't aim for that, but I like hearing it, because I think the implication is that it feels good, that you want to see it again, so that's high praise," Anderson recently told Total Film magazine about some amount of audience confusion. "We were the centrepiece [of the New York Film Festival] and it was a weird feeling. Like, 'How did I get here? How do I get on the sidelines again?' It's »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Review: 'Before I Disappear' Starring Shawn Christensen, Emmy Rossum And Ron Perlman

27 November 2014 7:41 AM, PST

For all but the biggest cinephiles, the Academy Awards shorts categories can feel like a game of chance, seeking to throw off viewers’ shots at winning the office Oscar pool. Shawn Christensen’s “Curfew” picked up the prize for 2012 in live-action short, and his film has been expanded into the full-length “Before I Disappear.” The feature gains a few recognizable faces and roughly 80 minutes in the translation, while it loses some of its charms, proving that sometimes less is more. Depressed and deep in debt, Richie (Christensen) is in the midst of a suicide attempt when his estranged sister Maggie (Emmy Rossum) calls in a panic. She needs Richie to pick up her 11-year-old daughter Sophia (Fatima Ptacek) from a recital and keep an eye on her for a few hours. Richie reluctantly agrees, but a few hours turns into a day. Richie takes Sophia across New York City, sharing »

- Kimber Myers

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Review: Mariana Rondòn’s Underdeveloped And Unsubtle ‘Bad Hair’

27 November 2014 6:03 AM, PST

Subtlety is a privilege often dishonored in moviemaking. When pictures go out of their way to be bombastic instead of opting for the quieter, more gracious, approach, they tend to reveal a substratum of insecurity. Of course, one hardly faults blockbusters for having too much action (though, with a few in mind, there is such a thing as too too much action) and if a subtle technique goes against your core themes (like this year's examples "Whiplash," "Birdman" and “Interstellar”) then you have immunity. Whatever the context, however, there should always be a gauge by which one measures whether the filmmakers are cranking it too hard. What is this "it," you might ask? Anything, really: hammy performances, shaky cameras, hammered themes, etc. There's a breaking point for every element, in every film. And when theme reaches this breaking point, the whole picture comes crashing down. This is the unfortunate fate of Mariana Rondòn's "Bad Hair. »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Review: Entertaining And Well-Crafted 'The Imitation Game' Starring Benedict Cumberbatch & Keira Knightley

26 November 2014 2:28 PM, PST

In 1941, brilliant Cambridge mathematician Alan Turing was hired by the British military to break an infamous and seemingly indecipherable Nazi code called Enigma. Leading a group of misfit cryptanalysts, logicians and assorted wunderkinds, Turing directed the operation of code breakers to crack Enigma and win the war. But for Turing, this victory came at a terrible expense. Set in two periods —1951, after Enigma has long been broken, and 1941, as the irascible and arrogant Turing has applied for the code-breaking job (his unsocialzed Asperger’s-like personality almost getting him bounced out of the interview)— Graham Moore’s adept screenplay deftly navigates between both settings and even gives the latter period a touch of mystery, sending the suspenseful drama, taking place in the throes of WWII, off to the races. After a bumpy opening of unnecessary voice-over and on-the-nose dialogue, “The Imitation Game” takes off with a skillful trajectory. The thriller wastes no time. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Check Out This Infographic Guide To French Cinema History

26 November 2014 1:53 PM, PST

This lovely infographic made by Raffles Paris Hotels provides a nice introduction to French cinema. Not only has France produced some of the world's greatest filmmakers, they invented cinema as we know it. They patented the first cinématographie and hosted private and public film screenings before anyone else. The graphic also includes a list of landmark French films over the last century, but the most fascinating section is on the country’s rich film culture. There are currently 302 cinemas in Paris alone (compared to 117 in New York City) and the city is host to 190 film festivals. This is the kind of cultural landscape you get when arts funding is generously supported by the government, though in these times of austerity, let's hope that support remains.  There’s also some great info on the country's historic cinemas including the Cinémathèque Française (home to one of the largest archives of film in »

- Anthony Nicholas

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TV Review: 'Toy Story That Time Forgot' Featuring Tom Hanks, Tim Allen & Kristen Schaal, Is A New Christmas Classic

26 November 2014 1:12 PM, PST

When it was announced that Pixar would be endeavoring to make a fourth "Toy Story" feature film (set for release on June 16th, 2017), there were those who decried it as a shallow cash grab since, creatively, there was no where else for the franchise to go, especially after three beloved features and a handful of winning shorts. "Toy Story That Time Forgot," a 22-minute Christmas special airing on ABC on December 2nd, should put those fears of the franchise's creative longevity to rest; this is a weird and wild mini-movie, a new Christmas classic, and proof that there are untold avenues of experimentation within the "Toy Story" universe. After watching "Toy Story That Time Forgot," June 16th, 2017 will seem really far away. Instead of focusing on Woody or Buzz (or one of Andy's beloved playthings from the first two films), the emphasis is placed squarely on Trixie (Kristen Schaal »

- Drew Taylor

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