Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 126 items   « Prev | Next »


Göteborg Review: Inspiring, Absorbing Studio Ghibli Doc 'The Kingdom Of Dreams And Madness' Is A Must For Miyazaki Fans

7 hours ago

It's a bombastic title that, upon first glance at the unprepossessing exterior of a fairly nondescript modern office building in a Tokyo suburb, may seem like an overclaim. Even if you spot a round window or two, the more whimsical flourishes, like the rooftop garden, the light-filled interior staircase, the lazy old cat, the handwritten notes, and witty reminders that speckle the workplace it houses are only revealed later. But Mami Sunada's "The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness," which we finally caught up with at the Göteborg International Film Festival (whose documentary program this year has been excellent), is not, in fact, the story of a place. It is not even the story of the remarkable otherworldly work that is created within that place. Instead, it is the story of a company, and how a company — a business, with employees, boardrooms, meetings, schedules, routines, squabbles, politics, deadlines, and bottom lines — can have a. »

- Jessica Kiang

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Knight of Cups’ Producers: Malick’s Film Is “Stream Of Consciousness,” Antonio Banderas Doesn't Know Who He Plays

8 hours ago

Terrence Malick's "To The Wonder" "makes 'Tree of Life' look like 'Transformers,' " Ben Affleck said in 2012, just a few weeks before the film was unveiled to audiences for the first time in Venice. Some viewers loved it, but not everyone was impressed. One thing we can probably all agree on, Affleck’s comments, while well-intentioned, were a bit ridiculous, even meaningless (especially given that he kind of backtracked and sort of suggested the “half-crazy” experience was a bit frustrating). Producers and billionaire scions Min Kao and Alex Walton, two of the key financiers, gave a few more details about Malick's latest film, "Knight of Cups," in an interview with THR. We know the movie is about excess in Hollywood, but Kao filled in a few more details. “Christian Bale plays Rick, who is a screenwriter and filmmaker living in California,” he said. “From the outside, it looks like he has everything. »

- Edward Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Celine Sciamma's ‘Girlhood’ Approaches The Sublime

23 hours ago

This is a reprint of our review from the 2014 Cannes Directors' Fortnight. Bursting onto the screen in a blast of buzzing power pop, “Girlhood,” the Cannes Directors' Fortnight opening film from Celine Sciamma (“Water Lilies,” “Tomboy”), is marked from the outset by its energetic embrace of the complexity and contradictions of underprivileged, urban teenage life. A (American) football game is in progress, but the players beneath the pads are all female, mostly black, and speak a slangy colloquial French: they are, as the French title has it, a “Bande des Filles,” a gang of girls from the same notorious Parisian suburbs that spawned “La Haine.” Choosing to locate her story in these drab, socio-economically depressed surroundings and to tell it through the eyes of a young black girl is not only a departure for Sciamma, whose previous equally well-observed coming of age tales have played out in mostly white middle class settings, »

- Jessica Kiang

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Action & Panache Collide In The 'Kingsman: The Secret Service' Super Bowl Spot, Plus New Clip & Featurette

23 hours ago

So one 2015 spy comedy has already failed: “Mortdecai” with Johnny Depp, which flopped hard last weekend (here's our review). Now another one also arrives just but a few weeks later, but apparently has good buzz. Yep, despite being pushed from last fall to February of this year — not the best augur — “Kingsman: The Secret Service” has received great reviews (including our own). So it’s a witty, 007-type thing, but apparently it’s also entertaining, has kick-ass action, and doesn’t feature the lame duck humor that sunk “Mortdecai.” Here’s the official synopsis: Based upon the acclaimed comic book and directed by Matthew Vaughn (Kick Ass, X-Men First Class), Kingsman: The Secret Service tells the story of a super-secret spy organization that recruits an unrefined but promising street kid into the agency’s ultra-competitive training program just as a global threat emerges from a twisted tech genius. Directed by »

- Edward Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


Slamdance Review: Thriller Tries To Hide The 'Body'

30 January 2015 1:59 PM, PST

The thriller genre is certainly not short on movies in which the plot revolves around hiding a body, but for a directorial debut, co-writers and co-directors Dan Berk and Robert Olsen have chosen an appropriately low-stakes premise in which to get their feature film feet wet. And as such, you couldn't be blamed for lowering your expectations for "Body," which doesn't reinvent the wheel, nor strive to. Instead, Berk and Olsen seem happy enough to try and simply execute the tale, told within a very familiar milieu, and thanks to some good performances, and a keen sense of storytelling economy, they get they job done in wholly satisfactorily, if not blazingly original, manner. Right off the bat, thriller or horror fans hoping to get to the good stuff might be put off by the slow burn. In fact, we don't get to the body until at least a good third or so into the movie, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: U.S. Trailer And New Pics For Western 'The Salvation' Starring Mads Mikkelsen & Eva Green

30 January 2015 1:35 PM, PST

Do I even have to say anything other than Mads Mikkelsen and Eva Green made a western called "The Salvation"? That alone should be more than enough to get you to put this on your movie watching list, but should you need an extra push, a new U.S. trailer has arrived, along with a handful of new images.  Jeffrey Dean MorganJonathan PryceEric Cantona, and Mikael Persbrandt round out the ensemble in the film directed by Kristian Levring, which takes audiences to the 1870s, where a mild-mannered settler in America gets armed for vengeance after a ruthless gang leader murders his family. A familiar premise, sure, but this got a midnight slot at Cannes of all places, and while Jessica called it a "slavish devotion to great films that have gone before" and "little more than an extremely affectionate fake," I'm still very curious to check it out. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Review: Rodrigo Garcia’s ‘Last Days In The Desert’ With Ewan McGregor As Both Jesus & The Devil

30 January 2015 12:59 PM, PST

Sparse and austere, Rodrigo Garcia’s “Last Days In The Desert” is a meditative and moody look at fathers and sons through the eyes of Jesus as he vision quests through the desert seeking guidance from his own savior. While quiet and gorgeous to look at thanks to the stunning photography of Emmanuel Lubezki (“Birdman,” “The Tree Of Life”), Garcia’s drama is sometimes a little too whispered and distancing too impart much emotional or spiritual deliverance. A minimalist effort to be sure, Ewan McGregor stars as Yeshua (the Hebrew name for Jesus), fasting and wandering the desert for 40 days, trying to replenish his faith and find some answers. Feeling forsaken, he hasn’t heard from his father in a while, both literally and figuratively. Yeshua comes across the form of the devil (Ewan McGregor again), who fills his head with self-doubt and uncertainty. He also has hallucinatory, fever-ish dreams that suggest fear and entrapment, »

- Rodrigo Perez

Permalink | Report a problem


Directors: Peter Berg In, J.C. Chandor Out For 'Deepwater Horizon,' James Franco To Helm 'In Dubious Battle' & More

30 January 2015 12:37 PM, PST

One of the most fascinating filmmaking voices of the moment, and certainly one of the most prolific, J.C. Chandor has been moving from project to project — "Margin Call," "All Is Lost," "A Most Violent Year" — shifting from one genre to the next with ease. He had been on track to get his biggest project yet going, "Deepwater Horizon" starring Mark Wahlberg, but the director's participation has sunk. Chandor has exited the movie over the standard "creative differences." Instead, Wahlberg's "Lone Survivor" bud Peter Berg has stepped in to helm, and yeah, "creative differences" starts to make a whole lot of sense now. Penned by Matthew Sand and Matthew Carnahan, the film is based on the true events that occurred on an oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, and chronicles the courage of those who worked on the Deepwater Horizon and the extreme moments of bravery and survival »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Alternate Ending For 'Evil Dead' Remake Plus Deleted Scenes Unseen In The U.S.

30 January 2015 11:40 AM, PST

Though it seems to happen less often nowadays, at one time it wasn't uncommon for television broadcasts to show alternate versions of a movie. Whether by accident or intent, scenes would wind up making it onto TV that weren't in the theatrical cut of a film, or on home video, and it seems that for fans of the "Evil Dead" remake, there's a bit more horror lurking out there. In the U.K. recently, "Evil Dead" was broadcast and some alert viewers noticed that not only was there an alternate ending, but some deleted scenes — all of which have been unseen in the United States — made it to air. Fans have been quick to capture the material and get it online to share, but we'd wager it'll only last so long. There's an alternate ending in which Mia, missing an arm, makes it to the road to ask for help. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Review: Documentary ‘Finders Keepers’ Is A Bizarre Story About The Custody Battle Over A Human Leg

30 January 2015 11:03 AM, PST

The story at the heart of the documentary “Finders Keepers” is a completely bizarre one: the custody battle over a human leg, the ridiculous feud that ensues and the painful aftermath. In one corner you have John Wood, a disgraced heir with deep-rooted father issues and a drug habit, on the other you have an unscrupulous reptile in human form with his own issues. A tale that made worldwide “weird news” headlines back in 2007, Wood lost his leg in a plane crash, the same misfortune that killed his father. After the crash, in a strange tribute to his departed dad, Wood decided to embalm and keep the appendage. Severely depressed after the death of his father, which he blamed himself for, and addicted to painkillers, Wood soon bottomed out spiritually and financially. Down and out, the leg was lost after Wood failed to pay his bills and the contents of »

- Rodrigo Perez

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: First Teaser Trailer For Sion Sono's 'Shinjuku Swan'

30 January 2015 10:38 AM, PST

Sion Sono doesn't sleep. Or least that's what it seems like as the cult Japanese director is working at a remarkably prolific rate. It was only last fall that he was premiering "Tokyo Tribe" at the Toronto International Film Festival, and not only does he already have "Shinjuku Swan" in the can and ready for release this spring, he's got "Love & Peace" in post-production. And that's not all. According to Variety, Sono will release six movies this year. Watch your back Takashi Miike. Anyway, the first teaser for "Shinjuku Swan" is here, and yes, it looks like your typically wild Sono joint. Starring Go Ayano, Erika Sawajiri, Takayuki Yamada and Yusuke Iseya, and based on the manga series by Ken Wakui, the story follows an unemployed man who winds up recruiting women for the sex industry in Tokyo's red light district. And as you'll see in the trailer below, rival »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Göteborg Review: 'Food Inc.' Director Robert Kenner's 'Merchants Of Doubt' Takes On Spin Doctors

30 January 2015 10:10 AM, PST

There is nothing in Robert Kenner's "Merchants of Doubt," his follow-up documentary to 2008's fascinating expose of corporate malfeasance in the food sector "Food Inc," that we disagree with, or even want to weakly rebut. Nothing. The fluidly argued points flow with flawless logic one into the other, and the manner in which he traces the strategies used currently by vested interests in defence of their bottom lines, straight back to the playbook set out by Big Tobacco in the 1950s is irrefutable and wholly convincing, especially when presented in so enjoyably arch and ironic a manner. We vehemently agreed, laughed along at the more incredible and egregious fallacies highlighted, and could feel every single other member of the audience at our Goteborg International Film Festival screening doing the same. And that's a problem. "Merchants of Doubt," inspired by the Naomi Oreskes and Eric M Conway non-fiction book of the same name, »

- Jessica Kiang

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Justice Has A Price In First Trailer For 'Game Of Thrones' Season 5

30 January 2015 9:57 AM, PST

Can we even call "Game Of Thrones" a television show anymore? Last night, HBO's hit program arrived on select IMAX screens, and it speaks to the popularity of the series that showing the first two episodes of season four still had people buying tickets. But there was an added allure — the promise of the first trailer for season five. And indeed, it did screen, and inevitably, someone has made a shoddy recording on their cell phone. That said, this one is decent enough to watch, especially if you're a diehard fan. So, what do we get? Well, Tywin is dead, Tyrion is making his way across the Narrow Sea and Daenerys Targaryen is returning to Westeros for the Iron Throne. Basically, you're going to see a little of everyone in here, and yes, this looks every bit as epic as you were expecting. Frankly, we're just waiting for HBO to »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Martin Scorsese & Kenneth Branagh Have Had "Informal Conversations" About A 'Macbeth' Movie

30 January 2015 9:37 AM, PST

There is already one "Macbeth" coming this year — you know, the adaptation with Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard that's on our list of the 100 Most Anticipated Films Of 2015 — but there's always room for another version of the Bard's play, and certainly, if this happens, we'd happily sign on.  Baz Bamigboye reports that Martin Scorsese and Kenneth Branaugh have had "informal conversations" about Scorsese making a movie based on Branagh's Manchester International Festival production of "Macbeth." First playing the fest in 2013, it hopped over to New York City last summer, and Scorsese was apparently quite taken with it. The trick of this particular version is that the audience was brought right into the action, sitting literally inches away from the battles, speeches and more, making for a truly immersive experience. So one could see what would be attractive from a filmmaking standpoint to try and bring movie audiences that same sense of. »


- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


The Biggest Breakout Stars, Filmmakers & Newcomers Of The 2015 Sundance Film Festival

30 January 2015 9:06 AM, PST

The 2015 Sundance Film Festival is staring to wind down. There are a few films still left to unspool, but The Playlist team have returned home, Park City is beginning to empty out and people are starting to look back and reflect on this year’s crop. And, on the whole, it seems to have been a good year. Certainly commercially, with a record-breaking number of buys (though it’s interesting that three of the most-buzzed titles all went to one place, Fox Searchlight), but also critically, with a strong batch of big hits (though yes, there were a few real stinkers). But festivals have a value beyond just movie-spotting: they also showcase filmmakers and performers who might be getting their first big break, or launch them into the stratosphere, and recent years have seen the careers of people like Damien Chazelle, Benh Zeitlin, Michael B. Jordan, David Lowery, Ava DuVernay, »

- The Playlist Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Joss Whedon Says 'Lucy' Is "A Huge Step" In Advancing Female-Driven Blockbusters

30 January 2015 8:49 AM, PST

Earlier this week, quotes by Joss Whedon about what he perceives to be the "intractable sexism" in the comic book movie industry made the rounds, but here's the thing — those quotes were from last summer from the set of "Avengers: Age of Ultron," and because they were under embargo, only started to surface now. And seeing his words months later, a bit surprised they've taken on the life that they have given his longstanding outspokenness regarding the representation of women in genre fare, Whedon has felt the need to correct the record a bit and share a few more thoughts on the issue.  Chatting with Buzzfeed, Whedon admits that at the time he made those aforementioned comments, he actually knew a "Captain Marvel" movie was in the works, but was still pessimistic about its prospects. "[I didn't expect] it to get any traction, honestly. That’s something that [Marvel Studios chief] Kevin [Feige] has been working on for a while. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


The 20 Best Films Of 2009

30 January 2015 8:02 AM, PST

With 2015 upon us, we figured it was a good time to look back on the movies the millennium has brought us. We've dug into the archives and are re-running our Best of the 2000s pieces, from way back in 2009 when the Playlist was a little Blogspot site held together with tape and string. Each list runs down the top 10 films of each year (it's possible that, half-a-decade on, we'd put them in a different order and even change some of the movies, but we wanted to preserve the original pieces untouched as far as possible). Check out 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 if you missed them, and today we continue with 2009. Fyi, unlike the other pieces, which were compiled by group, 2009 were the picks of Editor-In-Chief Rodrigo Perez only, and also went to twenty picks. If he were to do them again, they'd probably look very different, too... Getting a definitive top 10 out of the Playlist team is hard. »

- Rodrigo Perez

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Kristen Wiig Wins The Lottery And Gets A Talk Show In First Trailer For 'Welcome To Me'

30 January 2015 7:22 AM, PST

It's question that gets asked whenever the Powerball numbers go sky high: what would you do if you won the lottery? That query is answered in "Welcome To Me," the latest indie from future Ghostbuster Kristen Wiig, and the first trailer has made its way online. The story follows thirty-something, television-obsessed recluse Alice Klieg, who was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder since her teens and whose life changes when she wins $86 million. What does she do with the money? She starts her own talk show, a crazy lark that turns into a success. It's a wacky setup, but when we saw the movie at the Toronto International Film Festival, it was unsurprisingly Wiig who culled the most praise, with our review stating she's "never been funnier. Her crass, narcissistic, capricious Alice is her greatest creation." "Welcome To Me" will open later this year via Alchemy. Watch below. [Film Divider] »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Santa Barbara International Film Festival Exclusive: Trailer For Conservation Documentary 'Tiger Tiger'

30 January 2015 7:06 AM, PST

From the deepest oceans to the highest peaks, Mother Nature's beautiful and awe-inspiring handiwork has fascinated filmmakers for as long as there has been film. But as those environments face increasing crises with extinction, industrial damage, and the encroachment of human development, moviemakers have used their cameras to help sound the alarm. At the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, the forthcoming "Tiger Tiger" will shine a light on a majestic animal whose days are numbered unless action is taken. Directed by George Butler ("Pumping Iron"), the film centers on Dr. Alan Rabinowitz, a big cat conservationist and CEO of Panthera, an organization dedicated to their protection. Rabinowitz is on a mission to save the little more than three thousand tigers left living in the wild, and "Tiger Tiger" follows him into the Sundarbans in Bangladesh, one of largest and largely unexplored big cat habitats. However, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Moore Says Clint Eastwood Threatened To "Kill" Him 10 Years Ago, Calls 'American Sniper' A "Mess"

30 January 2015 6:29 AM, PST

It seems that as the astounding box office for "American Sniper" continues to grow, so does the partisan bickering over a movie that is so slipshod that its politics (or lack thereof) are the least of its issues. For those on either side of the political aisle, it has become a movie to rally around, leading to a variety of preposterous developments. Jesse Ventura has grabbed some easy headlines on the talk show rounds declaring that he refuses to see Clint Eastwood's film, and has branded the film's deceased subject Chris Kyle "a liar." Meanwhile, Brann’s Sizzling Steaks & Sports Grille has officially banned Seth Rogen (who tweeted and later apologized that 'Sniper' "reminds me of the movie that's showing in the third act of 'Inglorious Basterds' ") as well as Michael Moore. As you might already know, Moore tweeted that "snipers were cowards" and later posted a long explanation on. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 126 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners