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Watch: 3-Minute Video Makes Side-By-Side Comparison Of ‘Yojimbo’ And ‘A Fistful Of Dollars’

12 February 2016 3:15 PM, PST

From a postmodernist perspective, perhaps there is nothing left to art but the deconstruction of what’s already been created, piecing together the ideas of those you admire. In that case, then perhaps Sergio Leone was ahead of his time in 1964 when he made “A Fistful of Dollars,” the first film in the spaghetti western 'Dollars' trilogy, which was in fact a remake of Akira Kurosawa’s 1961 samurai epic “Yojimbo." Read More: 13 Essential Female-Lead Westerns By the same hand, Kurosawa adapted ideas from Dashiell Hammett’s brilliant novel “Red Harvest,” though he claims he modeled the film after “The Glass Key,” but historians — and myself as a reader of both books — beg to differ. In “Red Harvest” the protagonist — who comes to a small town trying to stop the corruption amongst local gangs and the law — has no name, thus inspiring the mysterious leads in both Kurosawa and Leone’s films. »

- Samantha Vacca

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Review: Sly And Original Horror-Comedy-Romance 'Nina Forever'

12 February 2016 3:00 PM, PST

Rob (Cian Berry) is a grocery store clerk who recently tried to kill himself after not being able to cope with the depression brought on by the sudden, tragic death of his girlfriend Nina (Fiona O’Shaughnessy). Holly (Abigail Hardingham) is Rob’s co-worker, who has a morbid fascination with pain and death, so obviously she’s immediately smitten with Rob. This is the perfect pairing, at least for now, since Rob is in desperate need of a romantic connection in his life so he can at least attempt to get over Nina’s death, and Holly needs to be in an edgy relationship after her ex dumped her for being too "vanilla." The sex that bookends their date seems to go spectacularly well. Sparks fly as the two young lovers copulate with abundant mutual attraction and chemistry. Suddenly, the sheets are covered with blood, a pair of gory hands emerges out of the bed, »

- Oktay Ege Kozak

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'The Big Short' Co-Writer Thinks Casting Of Michael Fassbender In 'Steve Jobs' Was "Problematic"

12 February 2016 2:41 PM, PST

In a few weeks, the awards season will be wrapped up, and time will start being the judge of those of won, the pictures that didn't make the grade, and those that perhaps should have. For me, I think "Steve Jobs" deserved a bit more love beyond the acting nods for Michael Fassbender and Kate Winslet (Daniel Pemberton's score, for example, is pretty underrated, one of the better ones of the year). But there were many who had issues with Danny Boyle's movie, including those who wound up with Oscar nominations. Read More: The 20 Best Movies Of 2015 All the Best Screenplay nominees gathered together for a panel talk this week, and when asked what changes they would make the other Oscar nominated films by moderator Jeff Goldsmith, "The Big Short" co-writer, Charles Randolph, took a little jab at "Steve Jobs," which, notably, also missed a screenplay nod for Aaron Sorkin. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 6-Minute Video Essay Explores The Themes And Beauty Of 1960s Jean-Luc Godard

12 February 2016 2:21 PM, PST

“Photography is truth. The cinema is truth twenty-four times a second,” spoke the inimitable but often emulated Jean-Luc Godard, an auteur with film pulsating through his veins. Commencing with 1960’s “Breathless,” his first feature-length film, and the one that catapulted his legendary career, Godard’s become one of those directors with his own adjective, an instantly recognizable artist whose erudite work continues to inspire cinephiles all over the world. Read More: Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Explores How Jean-Luc Godard’s ‘Breathless’ Changed Post-wwii Cinema While simultaneously launching the careers of ex-wife Anna Karina and "Breathless" star Jean-Paul Belmondo, amongst others, Jlg beautifully coalesced the worlds of philosophy, politics, and humanism into marmoreal works of art. In this new video essay for Criterion by frequent contributor kogonada, the close-ups, the oddball sequences, and the brilliant, adjunct mood changes are all slyly pieced »

- Samantha Vacca

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'Deadpool' Writer Details Action Scenes That Were Removed When Budget Was Cut By $7 Million

12 February 2016 2:04 PM, PST

With "Deadpool" poised to be a box office behemoth this weekend, fans will no doubt be feting 20th Century Fox for taking a gamble on a hard-r movie centered around the cult character, but wise executives always protect their risky moves. Just before the green light was given, the filmmakers were given a task by studio suits — cut the budget by $7 million. Writer Rhett Reese revealed that meant dropping some action scenes from the movie. So what was torn out from the script?  Read More: Review: 'Deadpool' Starring Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, Tj Miller, And More “Angel Dust, played by Gina Carano, used to be three different characters,” Reese told io9. “It was Garrison Kane, Sluggo and Wire. There was a reduction of action. We had a motorcycle chase between Deadpool and Ajax on the freeway that we took out. We had a big, big gun fight in »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 3-Minute Supercut Highlights The Many, Many Film References In ‘The Simpsons’

12 February 2016 1:39 PM, PST

At this point, it’s safe to say “The Simpsons” has changed television forever. The animated series — which, in case you’ve forgotten, premiered way back in 1989, and is now in its 27th season — has seen its fair share of ups and downs, and become a sort of hotbed of critical debate, with some quick to write off every season after thirteen, and others clinging to the endless nostalgia of Homer and company. Granted, certain seasons have wound up unanimously reviled, while certain episodes have becomes staples of the genre. Throughout it all, though, the show has quite simply remained a wildly popular cultural staple. Read More: ‘The Simpsons’ Turns 25: Watch An 80-Minute Talk With Conan O’Brien & The Show’s Writing Team No matter where you stand on “The Simpsons,” one thing has been true since the beginning: the show’s love of movies. Over the 27 good years »

- Gary Garrison

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Terry Gilliam Now Says 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Will Start Shooting In September

12 February 2016 1:25 PM, PST

You should know the long version of the story by now, but here's the short one: Terry Gilliam has been trying to make "The Man Who Killed Don Quixote," but has been continually thwarted by disaster, delays, and other bumps in the road. But ever optimistic and hopeful, the director has been promising the picture will get made, though his various intended start dates tend to fall through. For example, last fall he said the picture, now backed by Amazon, would shoot in April. However, it looks like that won't be happening, and he now has a new start in mind. Read More: Terry Gilliam's 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Delayed Again Due To John Hurt's Cancer Diagnosis Speaking with The List at an event celebrating the work of Cervantes in Edinburgh, Gilliam shared his next proposed timeframe for the 'Quixote.'  "I always believe »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Berlin Review: John Michael McDonagh's 'War On Everyone' With Michael Pena & Alexander Skarsgard

12 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST

Lesbians. The Burmese. Maybe farmers. With all the minorities, interest groups, nationalities sexualities, and ethnicities that John Michael McDonagh finds time to craft a specially designed slur for, or chuck a throwaway insult at, in his shambolic, shaggy, occasionally very funny "War on Everyone," it becomes a fun game to work out if there's anyone who definitely will not be offended. I don't think Tibetans get a mention, and I'm pretty sure meteorologists and albinos emerge unscathed. Everyone else — including the short, the bald, the fat, the bearded, the female, the black, the Muslim, the Quaker, the homeless, those afflicted with Down Syndrome or Multiple Sclerosis, the British, the Irish, the Icelandic, the generally European, the transgender, the male homosexual, the Japanese, the effeminate, the aristocrat, the Mexican, the alcoholic, the Stephen Hawking, the dyslexic, anyone on the fence about the music of Glen Campbell or partial to the art of mime or involved in. »

- Jessica Kiang

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Watch: First Clip From 'Genius' Starring Colin Firth & Jude Law

12 February 2016 12:23 PM, PST

It's not easy to make the task of writing cinematic, and I can only imagine that doing the same for editing is even more difficult. But Michael Grandage, the screenwriter behind "The Madness Of King George," will attempt to do just that with this directorial debut, "Genius." The film centers around editor Max Perkins (Colin Firth) and "Look Homeward, Angel" author Thomas Wolfe (Jude Law), and the creative relationship between the pair. Perkins, who also worked with Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald, is regarded as an important figure in the lives of those writers, helping them cut through the clutter to find their voice. But as anyone who has read Wolfe knows, his beautiful prose is already a thicket of words to begin with, and this clip from EW shows how the movie depicts Perkins' valuable insights. Read More: The 10 Most Anticipated Films Of The 2016 Berlin Film Festival “I »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: 11-Minute Video Essay Explores How ‘Reservoir Dogs’ Pays Homage To 'City On Fire'

12 February 2016 12:08 PM, PST

It’s sometimes hard to believe that we’re already two decades and eight films into the working life of Quentin Tarantino. Like Martin Scorsese, Tarantino is a proud cinephile and film obsessive, and his knowledge of film and film history is likely one the best in the industry today. What can’t be argued, though, is the layering, homage, and depth that Qt has worked into each of his films, even his very first, “Reservoir Dogs.” Read More: What’s Left? Quentin Tarantino Talks The Remaining Movies He Could Make Before Retirement To help us sort through all of the homage and references in “Reservoir Dogs,” The Film Theorists have put together a new video essay, “Reservoir Dogs: Stolen Or Homage,” another exciting entry in the “Frame By Frame” series that breaks down scenes and movies to their beautiful bare bone. The essay draws out the the uncanny »

- Gary Garrison

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Berlin Exclusive: Trailer For The Uniquely Funny 'How Heavy This Hammer'

12 February 2016 11:21 AM, PST

While film festivals boast their big World Premieres, the events are also important for smaller films to continue the momentum they've built elsewhere. Last fall, writer/director Kazik Radwanski hit Tiff to unveil his new feature, "How Heavy This Hammer," and after a positive reception, he's getting his passport ready to head to the Berlin International Film Festival to show European audiences what he's cooked up, and today we have the exclusive trailer. Read More: The 10 Most Anticipated Films Of The 2016 Berlin Film Festival Starring Erwin Van Cotthem, Kate Ashley, Seth Kirsh, and Andrew Latter, the uniquely funny film centers on a married man whose life unravels as becomes even more of a social outcast. Here's the synopsis:  The mournful aria already suggests that the battle is lost and sure enough, the walls of the fort are soon breached. Skirmishes, spurting blood, scattered resistance and the defences duly come crashing down, »

- Edward Davis

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Watch: New Trailer For AMC's 'The Night Manager' Starring Tom Hiddleston

12 February 2016 11:05 AM, PST

The migration of top-shelf filmmakers and A-list talent to television continues, with the possibility of going long and deep (get your mind out of the gutter) seemingly enticing everyone at the moment. The latest iteration of this phenomenon is “The Night Manager” mini-series directed by Susanne Bier and starring Tom Hiddleston. An adaptation of John le Carré’s novel of the same name, it's about an ex-soldier working undercover to convict one of the world’s most powerful arms dealers under the watchful eyes of Britain’s MI6. However, he is not just driven by honorable motives but also by a personal vendetta. Here’s the synopsis from AMC: Read More: The 25 Most Anticipated New TV Shows Of 2016 A contemporary interpretation of le Carré’s espionage drama – and the first television adaptation of a le Carré novel in more than 20 years – The Night Manager mini-series will bring together love, loss »

- Edward Davis

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Watch: First Trailers For HBO's Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas Drama 'Confirmation' & 'Veep' Season 5

12 February 2016 10:46 AM, PST

With the election cycle in full swing, you'll also have plenty of small screen entertainment to keep the politically charged energy brewing. Netflix drops the new season of "House Of Cards" next month, and later this spring, HBO has a couple of their own projects up their sleeve. First, on April 16th, will be "Confirmation," a dramatization of Anita Hall's battle against Clarence Thomas during his Supreme Court hearings. Rick Famuyia ("Dope") directs the cast which stars Kerry Washington, Wendell Pierce, Greg Kinnear, Jeffrey Wright, Eric Stonestreet, and Jennifer Hudson, in the the film details the explosive 1991 Clarence Thomas Supreme Court nomination hearings, which brought the country to a standstill and forever changed the way we think about sexual harassment, victims’ rights, and modern-day race relations. Read More: First Look At Kerry Washington As Anita Hill In HBO's 'Confirmation' On a lighter note, "Veep" season 5 »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Berlin Review: Jeff Nichols' 'Midnight Special' With Michael Shannon, Joel Edgerton, Kirsten Dunst & Adam Driver

12 February 2016 10:30 AM, PST

What if there were something entirely new in this world? What if it were your son? The idea that your child might be a semi-messianic, unprecedented creature of ungovernable, infinite potential is fairly common among parents, but what if it were proven to be a literal fact? Great science fiction is almost always founded on such simple but paradigm-shifting what-ifs, and the fourth feature from director Jeff Nichols ("Shotgun Stories," "Mud," "Take Shelter") brings this premise thrumming and throbbing to life. Structured as a low-key chase movie, unfolding with the dark urgency of a conspiracy thriller, living mostly not in your heart or even your mind but in the hairs on the back of your neck, "Midnight Special" actually emerges most resonantly as a mournful homage, or maybe a psalm, to the primal instincts of fatherhood. Read More: Eerie First Clip From Jeff Nichols' 'Midnight Special' With »

- Jessica Kiang

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Watch: First Trailer For Cameron Crowe’s New Showtime Series 'Roadies' With Luke Wilson, Carla Guigino & Imogen Poots

12 February 2016 10:15 AM, PST

Having started out as a Rolling Stone and Cream journalist at the precious age of 15-years-old, and directing iconic music films like “Almost Famous,” it’s safe to say that filmmaker Cameron Crowe knows about a little bit about rock n’ roll. While Crowe took some lumps last year for his poorly-received rom-com “Aloha,” the director is bouncing back with his new Showtime series, “Roadies,” which centers on the behind-the-scenes worker bees who keep rock shows on time, on schedule, and operational. Read More: The 25 Most Anticipated New TV Shows Of 2016 “It happened about eight years ago,” Crowe told EW of the show’s inception. “J.J. [Abrams, an exec producer alongside ‘My So-Called’ Life creator Winnie Holtzman and Crowe] and I both came up at the same time working with Jim Brooks, so we became friends. And then one time we just started pitching. He said, ‘I went to this show, and I looked up, and I saw this girl on a rigging tower, »

- Edward Davis

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Listen: Soundtrack To Martin Scorsese's HBO Series 'Vinyl,' Plus New Featurettes And Interview With Terence Winter

12 February 2016 9:54 AM, PST

This weekend, HBO is getting very rock 'n roll, with the two-hour, Martin Scorsese-directed season premiere of "Vinyl." The show takes viewers into the gritty realm of the 1970s music industry, following a record label honcho who makes his way through the sex and drug-riddled world, searching for the next big sound. The cast for this one is impressive, featuring Bobby Cannavale, Olivia Wilde, Ray Romano, Juno Temple, James Jagger, and many more. It's been a long journey, with the show's executive producer and writer Terence Winter sharing that the project has been brewing for over a decade. Read More: Soundtrack For Martin Scorsese's 'Vinyl' Includes Otis Redding, Foghat, The Meters, And More "The germ of this started well before I got involved. In 1996, Mick Jagger approached Martin Scorsese and pitched him on the idea of doing a version of the movie 'Casino' set »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Michael Mann At Bam: The Recut 'Blackhat,' The Authenticity Behind 'Thief,' 'Heat,' ‘Ali,’ 'Collateral,' & More

12 February 2016 9:31 AM, PST

Last night at the Brooklyn Academy Of Music, as part of their “Heat & Vice: The Films of Michael Mann” retrospective, the legendary filmmaker himself graced the stage for an engaging one-hour-plus talk. The conversation spanned his entire career tracking the very early days (TV movie “The Jericho Mile”), his debut feature (“Thief”), his crime classics ("Manhunter," “Heat,” “Miami Vice”) and his latest film, the cyber hacker movie “Blackhat,” which he recently recut for the retrospective (read our review here). Read More: Retrospective: The Films Of Michael Mann Fiercely intelligent and an autodidact known for his near-mythic levels of research when immersing himself in a project — he’s only made eleven features in thirty-four years and abandoned several projects despite years of investigation — Mann’s films often center on the codes of men and their professions, usually revolving around crime. These men often live what Mann constantly refers to as an “authentic. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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Exclusive: Clip From Jia Zhangke's 'Mountains May Depart' Visits The Past

12 February 2016 8:35 AM, PST

Making its World Premiere at the Cannes Film Festival last spring, winning an Audience Award at the San Sebastian Film Festival, and picking up an Original Screenplay prize at the Gold Horse Awards, Jia Zhangke's latest film "Mountains May Depart" enjoyed a terrific festival run in 2015. This weekend, the drama arrives in cinemas and we've got an exclusive clip to give you a peek at the sprawling story. Read More: Review: Jia Zhangke's Ambitious 'Mountains May Depart' Starring Dong Zijian, Liang Jingdong, Sylvia ChangZhang Yi, and Zhao Tao, the film, powered by Pet Shop Boys' "Go West," opens in 1999 where in Fenyang, childhood friends Liangzi, a coal miner, and Zhang, the owner of a gas station, are both in love with the town beauty Tao. Tao eventually marries the wealthier Zhang and they have a son he names Dollar. As the years fly by, her son loses sight of everything in his childhood, »

- Edward Davis

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Watch: Foul-Mouthed, Nsfw New Trailer For Melissa McCarthy's 'The Boss'

12 February 2016 8:10 AM, PST

It seems Hollywood comedians are enjoying sticking it to the 1%. Last year, Will Ferrell played a millionaire who hit rock bottom in "Get Hard," and this spring, Melissa McCarthy will bring her comedy stylings to the similarly themed "The Boss," and a foul-mouthed new trailer has just landed. Read More: New Images Of Paul Feig's 'Ghostbusters' Gang Arrive Kristen Bell, Peter Dinklage and Kathy Bates co-star in the Ben Falcone ("Tammy") directed movie about an industry icon, whose professional career falls apart, forcing her to rebuild herself and her brand from scratch. It's clear that hose she burned along the way won't be lending a helping hand. Here's the official synopsis:  Academy Award®-nominated star Melissa McCarthy (Bridesmaids, The Heat, Tammy) headlines The Boss as a titan of industry who is sent to prison after she’s caught for insider trading. When she emerges ready to rebrand »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Paddy Considine Starts Shooting His Next Directorial Effort 'Journeyman' In March

12 February 2016 7:33 AM, PST

Cornerstone Films announced this week that multi-talented writer, director, and actor Paddy Considine has found his next filmmaking gig, the boxing drama “Journeyman.” Considine directed the excellent and underrated BAFTA-Award winning “Tyrannosaur,” and his second feature continues his collaboration with producing partner Diarmid Scrimshaw of Inflammable Films. Currently in pre-production and shooting in early March, Considine wrote the screenplay, will direct it and will also star. Jodie Whittaker (“One Day”), Faraz Ayub (“Honor”), Tony Pitts (“War Horse”) and Paul Popplewell (“’71”) will form the main members of the supporting cast. Here’s the official synopsis: Journeyman is a powerful and beautiful story about loss and, ultimately, triumph. It's about our identity, and how in life we sometimes have to dig deep into our soul to discover who we really are. Matty Burton is the middleweight boxing champion of the world. Now, coming towards the end of his career, »

- Edward Davis

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