Week of   « Prev | Next »

17 articles


Interview: Patricio Guzmán

1 hour ago

There's a metamorphosis during Patricio Guzmán's breathtaking documentary The Pearl Button that somewhat echoes the one that has occurred in his recent career. He started out in cinema vérité he tells me when we meet to discuss his latest film in London, "almost photojournalism" he says via a translator. With 2010's Nostalgia for the Light and this new one he has embraced a more ephemeral and philosophical type of filmmaking that seems completely different on the surface before emerging as a new angle from which to discover the same truths as ever. In The Pearl Button, Guzmán seems to veer suddenly from slowly diminishing aboriginal communities to the 'disappearances' of the Pinochet era only to bring them together in startling and poignant fashion. »

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Miguel Gomes

1 hour ago

Following the widespread acclaim of his monochrome 2012 feature Tabu, Miguel Gomes ups the stakes with six-hour three volume epic Arabian Nights. An extraordinarily ambitious and eclectic work, it combines the mythology of Scheherazade's tales with a critique of the Portuguese government's program of austerity during the financial crisis. Confused? You may will be. But there is something quite brilliant here. Between cigarettes and with glass of red wine in hand, he spoke to CineVue's Matthew Anderson about his latest cinematic creation.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: The Childhood of a Leader

19 hours ago

★★★☆☆ We all wonder how momentous individuals came to be: what Hitler or Stalin were like as children; what happened to them. Did we know anyone like that? How far were any of us from becoming something similar? Brady Corbet's debut feature The Childhood of a Leader, shoots for this target with all the subtlety of an artillery barrage. The opening scene paints the mood of the time, World War I, with a concussive score accompanying black-and-white war footage. It's a little like Man With a Movie Camera, only devoid of humour or optimism. This is not industry as a boon to revolution, but industrial slaughter. It shows mankind’s frightening, newfound power - the sort of power great leaders can, and did, come to harness.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: David Brent: Life on the Road

20 hours ago

★★★☆☆ It may not come as too much of a surprise to learn that David Brent can't quite carry an entire feature film all on his own - but there's humour enough in Life on the Road to justify the project, even if it falls considerably short of the ensemble excellence that made The Office so beloved and lionised. Anyone who felt that Swindon's king of cringe deserved another visit will be sated without feeling the real delight of Brent at his worst and - yeah - his best. Gervais is shrewd enough to realise that Brent's song-writing was the greatest untapped resource of his entertainment-with-a-message credo.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Special Feature: Buster Keaton 1917-1923

23 August 2016 1:21 AM, PDT

"This fellow Keaton seems to be the whole show." So says Buster on a visit to the titular playhouse in a 1921 short where the stony-faced actor-director appears simultaneously as spectator, conductor, performer and musician on a programme with only one name - his own. Revelling in the union of cinematic invention and the inner workings of life on the stage, multiple exposures allow for jaw-dropping replications of his figure before an ingenious deployment of backstage mirrors achieves the same effect by more traditional means.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Swallows and Amazons

23 August 2016 1:13 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Going back to basics is never a bad thing. The 2016 blockbuster season has been littered with a procession of woefully incoherent, poorly acted, CGI-dominated offerings whose money-spinning intentions have forgone one essential element of filmmaking: a good story. Those useless scurvy dogs. Mercifully, some still fly the flag for substance over style and plucky British contender Swallows and Amazons is a charming, old-fashioned adventure yarn that soars high above and away from the wreckage of vacuous, high-spending millennials. With a wealth of TV experience behind her British director Philippa Lowthorpe has set sail with Arthur Ransom's beloved children's novel and achieved a heart-racing, consistently funny and enchanting film that builds upon the original story.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Criterion Review: The In-Laws

23 August 2016 12:31 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Alan Arkin and Peter Falk send up their dramatic personae to great effect in Arthur Hiller's 1979 The In-Laws, a wonderfully balanced and often hilarious comedy that benefits from the formidable talents of its leads. Sheldon Kornpett (Arkin) is a successful dentist excited about his daughter's impending wedding. Little does he know that the father of the groom (Falk), is waist-deep in organised crime, having recently pulled off the heist of the century. Invariably, Sheldon quickly becomes tied up with his new in-law Vince's nefarious dealings, forcing the pair to go on the lam in Honduras and attempt to hawk Vince's stolen Us Mint imprints to loopy military dictator General Garcia (Richard Libertini).

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Stalker

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★★★ Stalker is, without a doubt, Russian auteur Andrei Tarkovsky's masterpiece. Based on the short novel Roadside Picnic by brothers Boris and Arkady Strugatsky (who also wrote the screenplay), the story offers a basic almost clichéd science fiction premise. A meteor has landed, a mysterious visitation of some kind, and the now forbidden Zone surrounding the event has become a place of illicit pilgrimage. It is rumoured that within the Zone there is a room in which whoever enters has their deepest wish granted. The catch is that - being your deepest wish - you don't actually know what the wish is until it is granted.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Weiner

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ "Why did you let us film this?" Josh Kriegman asks Anthony Weiner towards the end of Weiner, which Kriegman directed alongside Elyse Steinberg. It's a question that a documentarian should never ask. It goes against the fly-on-the-wall ethos and is dangerously self-defeating to the filmmakers. It's testament to the incredible scenes played out in this behind-the-scenes portrait of the implosion of Weiner's 2013 New York mayoral campaign that the filmmakers themselves are baffled by what they're being allowed to witness. This is a political documentary which out-satires comedies such as The Thick of It and Veep; proving that, even at the highest levels, politics can be more ludicrous and bizarre than anything mere comedians can think up.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: The Bloodstained Butterfly

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Duccio Tessari's 1971 film The Bloodstained Butterfly opens with scrolling text that paraphrases Kuki Shūzō's A Philosopher's Poetry and Poetics, stating that the present only exists in the shadow of the past and future. By twisting time through a combination of superb editing and the judicious withholding of crucial information, The Bloodstained Butterfly creates a labyrinthine world in which truth is frustratingly elusive and meaning is reflected, distorted and decontextualized out of existence.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: The Shop on the High Street

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★★★ The creeping grip of fascism has been a regular source of inspiration for filmmakers for decades, both in explicit reference to the Second World War and in more nuanced portrayals of corruptive ideology. It could be argued that the current political climate, across Europe and in the USA, illustrates with alarming perspicuity the continued urgency of such work. In a world of condoned bigotry and the rise of right wing groups, the slippery slope of quiet acceptance that ensnares Tóno (Josef Kroner) in Ján Kadár and Elmar Klos' The Shop on the High Street is of lamentable but undeniably pertinence.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Microwave Massacre

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★☆☆☆☆ Boutique home entertainment label Arrow Video has made a name for itself as a purveyor of premium cult schlock, specialising in the rediscovery and restoration of semi-forgotten video nasties and trans-Atlantic exploitation cinema of the 1970s and 80s. The films in Arrow's collection may be cheap, nasty and even offensive, but they are nevertheless important, occupying their place in the canon of alternative cinema: a grimy, popular antidote to the self-regarding film school history of Godard, Tarkosvky and Bergman.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Conversation Piece

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ A 'conversation piece' is an informal family portrait painting, primarily from 18th century Britain. Such a genre of artwork forms a perfect inspiration for Luchino Visconti's penultimate film, Conversation Piece, which echoes both its painterly beginnings and transposes its title more literally into the cinematic medium. It fascinates and stultifies in unexpectedly equal measure, quoting the visual splendour, and arrangement, of the canvases it refers to and settling into recurrent - and on occasion tiresome - dialogue scenes.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Where to Invade Next

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆ Where to Invade Next is a collage of Michael Moore's favourite progressive ideas from across the globe. From generous state-mandated holidays in Italy to debt-free education in Slovenia, Moore picks the policies and practices he believes America should be expropriating for itself - a kind of neo-colonialism the veteran documentarist is more comfortable with than the current Middle-Eastern variety. Unfortunately, although Moore picks an interesting mix of countries and policies, he crams far too many of them into a single documentary, resulting in a hodgepodge of generalisations and cherry picking likely to annoy and at times even infuriate the intelligent viewer. Let's start with Italy, where Where to Invade Next begins.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: Cry of the City

23 August 2016 12:30 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ The supporting promotional blurb around Robert Siodmak's 1948 New York-set crime yarn, Cry of the City mentions its influence over one the city's favourite cinematic sons, Martin Scorsese. The grimy depiction of the mean streets of Little Italy might be a surface comparison, but the themes of catholic guilt and the symbiotic relationship between cop and criminal certainly feel somewhat ingrained in the director's psyche. Siodmak's strong directorial style (he cut his teeth on a number of B-films prior to this feature) offers up a heavily atmospheric vision for the time. While categorised under the noir label, the director manages to flip many of the genre archetypes on their head.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Behemoth

22 August 2016 4:42 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ China is the largest coal consumer in the world. The electricity derived from the coal-fuelled power stations drives the huge economic growth of the past decades. At the current rate of consumption it looks unlikely that the coalfields, which contain 13% of the coal in the world, will last much longer. The environmental and human cost of coal mining and burning is almost incalculable. Chinese documentarian Zhao Liang returns with an impressionistic poem of a film centred on coal. Behemoth is a stunning and moving denunciation of the situation in Inner Mongolia, where the mining industry is permanently changing the landscape.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Tickled

22 August 2016 3:33 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ It's unlikely you're going to come across too many documentaries this year with a yarn to spin as tangled and twisted as Tickled. Following the investigations of New Zealand pop culture journalist David Farrier, it is essentially an expose of a particular media company who specialise in online videos of Competitive Endurance Tickling (Cet). And yes, that is as weird as it sounds. From stumbling upon a bizarre video of the 'sport' in action, Farrier and his co-director Dylan Reeve quickly find themselves prodding at the dark underbelly of a seedy practice, uncovering unnerving power games and trying to unravel an elusive mystery.

»

- CineVue

Permalink | Report a problem


17 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners