Week of   « Prev | Next »

16 articles


Film Review: 'Jimi: All Is By My Side'

17 hours ago

★★☆☆☆ John Ridley’s Jimi: All Is By My Side (2013) is an intriguing shambles of a film. Denied rights by the Hendrix estate, the film looked doomed from the get go. This legal imposition turns out to be by the by, and the fact Jimi doesn’t bang out tune after tune from Hendrix's greatest hits collection is the least of Ridley's worries. Nonetheless, there is some enjoyment to be harvested in the notable performances of a cast that includes former Outcast member André Benjamin in the title role. Ridley decides to focus on Hendrix in his pre-fame years between 1966-7. Hendrix is 23, and making a living playing in New York's numerous back-alley bars and music halls as a backing guitarist.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'This Is Where I Leave You'

23 October 2014 12:35 PM, PDT

★★☆☆☆

Shawn Levy, director of Night at the Museum (2006) and Date Night (2010), takes a break from his usual comedy-heavy fare to direct the sparse family drama This Is Where I Leave You (2014). After catching his wife in bed with his boss, radio producer Judd Atlman (Jason Bateman) sinks into a hazy depression, only for it to be exacerbated by the unexpected news of his father's death. Upon venturing back to his childhood home for the funeral, Judd is forced to reconnect with his mother Hillary (Jane Fonda), and each of his three siblings - Wendy (Tina Fey), Paul (Corey Stoll) and Phillip (Adam Driver) - who are all experiencing some form of disruption in their own lives. »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Competition: Win 'Godzilla' on DVD

23 October 2014 7:28 AM, PDT

Normal 0 false false false En-gb Zh-cn Ar-sa

The arrogance of man is thinking nature is in our control. To celebrate the release of Godzilla (2014) on Blu-ray 3D™, Blu-ray™ and DVD on October 27th, out now on Digital HD™ we are giving you the chance to win a copy on DVD. In this gritty, realistic sci-fi action epic, Godzilla returns to its roots as one of the world's most recognized monsters. Directed by Gareth Edwards (Monsters) and featuring an all-star international cast, this spectacular adventure pits Godzilla against malevolent creatures that, bolstered by humanity's scientific arrogance, threaten our very existence.  »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'The Book of Life'

23 October 2014 6:14 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆Experienced animator Jorge R. Gutierrez teams up with fan-favourite producer Guillermo Del Toro for his directorial debut The Book of Life (2014), a visually dazzling but regrettably stale spin on the colourful Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead. Manola (Diego Luna), the sensitive son of a prized bullfighter, and Joaquin (Channing Tatum), an adventurous risk-taker, are childhood best friends with one thing in common: their love for Maria (Zoe Saldana). As the boys grow older, they vie for Maria’s affection in different ways - one with soft songs of undying love, and the other with the point of a sword - hoping to emerge the victor.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'The Babadook'

23 October 2014 1:35 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Since Australian director Jennifer Kent’s debut feature, The Babadook (2014) premiered at this year's Sundance Film Festival there has been a tremendous hubbub of excitement from both critical and horror circles . Much like Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining (1980) before it The Babadook, appropriates the trappings of the horror genre and employs them in a terrifying exploration of the psychological scarring a fractured parental bond can cause. Widow Amelia (Essie Davis) is struggling to cope with the demands of her young unhinged son Samuel (Noah Wiseman) who, like many young boys his age, possesses an unhealthy obsession with monsters, magic and making weapons out of household utensils. »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: 'Two Days, One Night'

22 October 2014 2:28 PM, PDT

★★★★☆After the critically adored The Kid With a Bike (2011) saw celebrated Belgian filmmakers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne take a softer approach to telling yet another tale of urban struggle, the brothers return with Two Days, One Night (2014), an agonisingly realistic story about the lengths to which one woman goes to preserve her mental stability. Having avoided casting big-name stars in their previous eight films, the pair go against expectation and install Academy Award-winning French star Marion Cotillard, who gives perhaps her most perfectly realised performance to date. She stars as Sandra, a young mother recouping after the debilitating effects depression has had on her mental and physical wellbeing.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'Time Is Illmatic'

22 October 2014 8:16 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Rolling off New York's F line, 21st Street you find yourself in the maltreated bosom of North America's largest public housing development. Paved in the warren of great geometric brickwork, residents of Queensbridge lived in cost efficient Y-shaped complexes. It was said the area's abnormal design was the cheapest solution to permitting its inhabitants enough access to sunlight. And yet, in the bridge's shadows was the place where the Dream Team pushed, where only 'Shorty Doo-wop' stayed out all night, where the D's on the roof dwell and where pulling triggers brought fame to your name. Furthermore, the Projects has also been deemed one the most common geographical location to be eulogised in song.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'Fury'

22 October 2014 6:33 AM, PDT

★★★★☆The second film of director David Ayer's increasingly prolific career to be released this year following groggy Arnold Schwarzenegger shoot em' up Sabotage (2014), Fury (2014) is an epic Second World War action drama that - like each of his previous works - looks to examine the inner workings of violent men in violent circumstances on an even grander historical scale. Executive produced by leading star Brad Pitt and written by Ayer himself, the film is a bravura depiction of the harsh brutalities of war that, though monotonous, is an entirely rousing entry in the annals of great WWII cinema. Set in the spring of 1945 during the last month of the European Theatre of war, Pitt plays sergeant Don "Wardaddy" Collier.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review: 'Withnail and I'

22 October 2014 4:58 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Since it's bow in 1987, Bruce Robinson's semi-autobiographical black comedy, Withnail and I, has become a bona fide cult-classic. For years audiences have revelled in its depictions of drunkenness, drug addiction and camp debauchery. Subsequently, Robinson's most well-remembered film has garnered a great deal of mythologising and alcohol-fuelled hyperbole. However, scythe through its now legendary status,  and the alcohol-fuelled tale still endures as a timeless comic masterpiece, capturing Britain in the fading frenzy of the tale-end of the Sixties, with Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann starring as our thespian anti-heroes.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'Love, Rosie'

22 October 2014 4:42 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆Etching another notch on the bedpost of the already crowded ‘will-they-won’t they?’ vein of romantic comedy, Love, Rosie (2014) boasts a fresh-faced cast whose star power will inevitably be bolstered by appearing in this heinious exercise in ignoble triviality. Directed by Christian Ditter and adapted from Cecelia Ahern’s 2004 novel ‘Where Rainbows End’, Love, Rosie is ostensibly the iPhone generation's When Harry Met Sally (1989) - a saccharin-drenched drama that rarely merits the chemistry its central cast ably displays. The film sees Lily Collins plays the titular Rosie opposite Sam Claflin’s Alex, two best friends who’ve grown up together side by side. »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


London 2014: 'A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night' review

22 October 2014 2:09 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ 

For much of the past decade, creatures of the night have had to stand by and watch as their charisma was leeched by toothless tween angst franchises. Fortunately, attempts are now being made to give succubi their credibility back. First came the droll literary ennui of Jim Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive (2013) and now, in what has been billed as Iran's first vampire film, we has A Girl Who Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) the striking and achingly cool feature debut of America-based Iranian director Ana Lily Amirpour. Sprinkled with notes from genres both gothic and western, Amipour's expansion of her eponymous 2011 short film is a fantastic undead rebuke to Middle-Eastern patriarchy. »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


London 2014: 'It Follows' review

22 October 2014 1:11 AM, PDT

★★★★★With It Follows (2014), David Robert Mitchell has delivered one of the best horror films of the decade. A beautifully rendered vision of the teenage psyche in the 21st century, it’s a stylish, intelligent and densely textured masterpiece. While there are traditional scares and a familiar antagonistic force, the fear at the heart of the picture is terrifyingly human. We not only see the fragility of our younger selves reflected in its myriad horrors, we are confronted with the realisation that the nightmare of our teenage years is not ephemeral – it will haunt us throughout our lives. It Follows is the very essence of horror; sex, death and the bruising shackles of youth. »

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


London 2014: 'Dear White People' review

21 October 2014 10:05 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Writing about Justin Simien's barnstorming debut feature Dear White People (2014), critic Armond White drew a line between the film and the Hollywood gatekeepers' usually self-congratulatory cinematic response to race in America: "Simien's humorous sensibility must deal with the fact that the racial...attitudes of American film culture are controlled by a social class that demands its own recognition first." It's a searingly prescient jab that gets to the heart of race in American film in the 21st century. Dear White People cuts straight through prejudice, identity hang-ups and guilt complexes, laying out its thesis with such raw intelligence that nobody, regardless of background, will come away unruffled.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: 'Palo Alto'

20 October 2014 1:28 PM, PDT

★★☆☆☆Adapted from James Franco's novel of the same name - a reflection of the hometown ennui he managed to transcend, Palo Alto (2013) is another creative misfire from the talented multi-hyphenate. Franco's novel is a series of loosely connected vignettes that focuses on a group of teenage high schoolers and their inter personal relationships. The film is directed by 25-year-old Gia Coppola and suffers from the internal problems of a wannabe creative unsure of what outlet to use. Coppola has admitted that she was drifting through life: "I wasn't sure what my passion was. I never paid attention to movies until fairly recently." How lucky she is to be the granddaughter of Francis Ford Coppola and niece of Sofia Coppola.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


Blu-ray Review: 'Shivers'

20 October 2014 3:23 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Almost forty years after its first release, Shivers (1975) is still difficult to watch. Even for a director as renowned for his bizarre visions as David Cronenberg, his first big budget production - known under several alternative titles including They Came from Within and Orgy of the Blood Parasites - this film is weird. Starring 'Queen of Horror' Barbara Steele and actor/singer Paul Hampton it is not for the squeamish, or easily offended dealing as it does with several taboo subjects. Welcome to Starliner Towers, an ultra-modern apartment block where residents can live in peace and harmony, with their every need catered for.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


DVD Review: 'Cold in July'

20 October 2014 3:23 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆After dabbling satisfyingly with horror in his three features so far, director Jim Mickle adopts a decidedly different pace with Cold in July (2014), a violent crime thriller adapted from Joe R. Lansdale's novel of the same name. In his first major role since TV's Dexter plunged his knife for the final time, Michael C. Hall makes a welcome return to the big screen, demonstrating how his collected and effortlessly engaging manner can lift even the most average material. Set in East Texas in 1989, Hall plays Richard Done, a mulleted, mild-mannered everyman and devoted husband and father, whose moderate life takes a dramatic turn when, after being awoken one night, he fatally shoots a burglar in his home.

»

- CineVue UK

Permalink | Report a problem


16 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners