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17 articles


Film Review: 'Kajaki'

2 hours ago

★★★★☆Consciously attempting to remedy British cinema’s dirge of contemporary war films, outshone as they usually are by the superior American model, Kajaki (2014), the feature debut of Paul Katis, is a retelling of a harrowing true story that is notable both for its brutality and outstanding bravery. With a script developed by Katis and screenwriter Tom Williams, and based on extensive interviews with the surviving soldiers involved in the events, the film is an expertly crafted commemoration that focuses on the War on Terror in nightmarish microcosm. Set in 2006, the film sees a group of soldiers from the British Army’s 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment [3 Para], who are stationed at the Kajaki Dam in Afghanistan.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Horrible Bosses 2'

3 hours ago

★★☆☆☆Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis reunite for Horrible Bosses 2 (2014), a predictably bland and entirely unnecessary sequel to the 2011 comedy in which three mistreated employees conspired to murder their managers. While that film suceeded in at least partially delivering on its amusing premise, its follow-up does not. Fed up of being used and abused by their employers, Nick (Bateman), Kurt (Sudeikis) and Dale (Day) start their own business. Their first product attracts the attention of rich investor Bert Hanson (Christoph Waltz), who places a big order. Unexpectedly, though, he pulls out of the deal and steals their idea, leaving the trio in thousands of dollars of debt.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Paddington'

13 hours ago

★★★★☆

Originally conceived in 1958 by Michael Bond, Paddington Bear is given new life in Paul King’s quintessentially British family comedy. Packed to the rafters with a stellar cast that boasts Sally Hawkins and Ben Whishaw, Paddington (2014) is a tale of delights. Opening with the click of a black and white newsreel, a mustachioed explorer, Montgomery Clyde (Tim Downie) hacks through deepest, darkest Peru and encounters a rare species of talking bear with a penchant for the sticky orange stuff. Fast forward to the present day where we meet the pint-sized bear (Ben Whishaw) collecting oranges for his furry Aunt Lucy and grizzled Uncle Pastuzo, voiced by Imelda Staunton and Michael Gambon. »

- CineVue UK

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Film Review: '2001: A Space Odyssey'

14 hours ago

★★★★★ There are certain films that define the experience of what cinema is, and because of this they become hard to create a discourse around. Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is such a film. The idea of contemplating and theorising Kubrick's iconic film and then having to put these thoughts into words which will become sentences which will become paragraphs and eventually a published review are as hard as a simple explanation as to why one should go see 2001. To coincide with the BFI’s Sci-Fi season: Days Of Fear And Wonder, we have upon us the reissue of this unsurpassed conjunction of image, music and philosophical awe that becomes more of a puzzle the more you see it.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Stations of the Cross'

26 November 2014 5:16 AM, PST

★★★★☆Rigidity is both alpha and omega in Dietrich Brüggemann's stark and startling new religious drama, Stations of the Cross (2014) which arrives in British cinemas this Friday on the back of much festival praise. With form echoing function it is aesthetically austere and structurally meticulous in telling the story of a young girl whose saintly altruism is predestined to end in tragic martyrdom. Built around an exceptional lead performance from débutante Lea van Acken, Stations of the Cross is a captivating and visually arresting catastrophe designed as a series of fourteen almost entirely static shots in which characters movements must shift and shape the elegant compositions.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Concerning Violence'

26 November 2014 5:15 AM, PST

★★★★☆In answer to what he would do to follow 2011's multi-layered collage The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, Göran Hugo Olsson has settled on the fight against Colonists in Africa by its indigenous people by again raiding the archives of Swedish Television for Concerning Violence (2014). This time he is using as the contextual device the words of Frantz Fanon spoken by Lauryn Hill, from Fanon’s book The Wretched Of The Earth. With a filmed introduction by postcolonial theorist Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, the film is split into nine chapters that delve into different perspectives on the African uprising that sprung up all over the continent from 1975 onwards.

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- CineVue UK

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Competition: Win 'Ida' on DVD

26 November 2014 12:52 AM, PST

From acclaimed director Paweł Pawlikowski (Last Resort, My Summer of Love) comes Ida (2013), a poignant and powerfully told drama about 18-year-old Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska). A sheltered orphan, Anna is preparing to become a nun when she discovers that her real name is Ida and her Jewish parents were killed during the Nazi occupation. This revelation triggers a journey into the secrets of a repressed past evoking haunting legacies and the realities of post-war communism. To celebrate the DVD and Blu-ray release of Ida this Monday (24 November), we have Three DVD copies to give away. This is an exclusive competition for our Facebook and Twitter fans, so if you haven't already, 'Like' us at facebook.com/CineVueUK or follow us @CineVue before answering the question below.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Ida'

25 November 2014 2:44 PM, PST

★★★★☆Making his return to filmmaking after the groggy adaptation of Douglas Kennedy’s novel The Woman in the Fifth (2011), Polish filmmaker Pawel Pawlikowski’s latest, Ida (2013), is a spare and outstandingly minimalist drama very much in keeping with his cinematic fixation with outsiders who find themselves out of their depths. Set in 1960s Poland and starring Agata Trzebuchowska in her acting debut, the film sees her playing Anna, a sheltered 18-year-old novitiate nun who’s been raised in a convent all her life. On the verge of taking her vows, Anna makes a variety of life-changing discoveries: her real name is in fact Ida and her Jewish parents were killed during the Nazi occupation.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'You and the Night'

25 November 2014 1:07 PM, PST

★★★☆☆ After causing a stir on the Croisette where it premiered last year in the Critic's Week Sidebar You and the Night (2013) is the debut feature from Yann Gonzalez and it is as infuriating as it's spectacular. With a wholly original score from the director's brother, M83, it seems unsure of what it wants to be. To say it's confused would to an understatment, and no matter that it's moments of wonder make one imagine what could have been, ultimately we are left with a failure, which stems from the risible unintentionally laugh-out-loud first half. The opening forty-five minutes create problems that leaves the film in a place that no matter how great the last forty-five are, it cannot save the film from it's own petard.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Dawn of the Planet of the Apes'

25 November 2014 2:43 AM, PST

★★★★☆Memories of Tim Burton's woeful 2001 Planet of the Apes remake were thankfully replaced with far fonder recollections in 2011 following the release of Rupert Wyatt's Rise of the Planet of the Apes. An earnest entry in the flagging sci-fi franchise and a surprise hit at the international box office, a sequel was quickly green-lit with Wyatt once again penned in to direct. After dropping out of the project due to a conflict in vision with 20th Century Fox, Wyatt was replaced by Matt Reeves (Cloverfield, Let Me In) who, with Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014), not only carries on the torch of series rejuvenation but has also crafted an eminently darker, grey matter-stimulating post-apocalyptic follow-up sure to please fans. »

- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Winter Sleep'

24 November 2014 11:48 PM, PST

★★★★★ A sprawling, almost empty hotel ensconced in the Anatolian steppes plays host to inhibited and isolated souls in Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s captivating, slow burner, Winter Sleep (2014). A deserved winner of this year's Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival, Ceylan's latest is a claustrophobic chamber piece spun out into a vast, rich and beautifully intricate tapestry. Woven at its centre is Aydin (Haluk Bilginer); a grey, bearded, landowner who dispenses hortatory with relish, but whose own moral authority may be somewhat questionable. Driven by discourse on conduct and self-deception, a series of conversations form the narrative, resulting in a majestic and subtly rendered multi-character study.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

24 November 2014 11:46 PM, PST

★★★★☆When Marvel announced that the next characters they were going to introduce in Phase Two of their ongoing saga would include a walking tree and a talking raccoon, eyebrows were raised. With Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), a substantial punt is being taken not only on characters less familiar to the public, but in firing their universe into the unknown cosmos. Fortunately, the gamble has well and truly paid off. Helmed by James Gunn, this intergalactic yarn is not only a refreshing addition to the space opera sub-genre, but also one of the studio's most enjoyable films to date. Abducted from Earth as an orphan, Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) has grown into the swaggering 'Star-Lord' out in deep space.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'The Thief of Bagdad'

24 November 2014 8:00 AM, PST

★★★★☆In the early 1920s, Douglas Fairbanks was transformed from comedy star into swash-buckling heartthrob via The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921) and Robin Hood (1922). Arguably one of the high-notes amongst his sensational ripping yarns is 1924's The Thief of Bagdad, a reworking of the Arabian Nights that gave ample opportunity for his charisma to burst from the screen. His performance is complemented by lavish production design and unparalleled special effects in what was one of the decade's most expensive features. Now released on a terrific blu-ray transfer as part of the Masters of Cinema collection, this silent fantasy epic is well worth revisiting.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'White Reindeer'

24 November 2014 6:06 AM, PST

★☆☆☆☆Even as far back as 1843, when Charles Dickens penned his illustrious novella A Christmas Carol, the materialism of Christmas was already apparent. Dickens wrote “Christmas is a poor excuse every 25 December to pick a man’s pocket” and it’s a cynical, yet astute statement that resonates even to this day. Fast-forward 171 years and we have Zach Clark’s pitch-black Christmas comedy White Reindeer (2014) – a film that appropriates the distilled essence of contemporary consumerism and the gauche spectacle of the holiday season and examines it through an excruciatingly pretentious and emotionally detached tale of grief and forced self-discovery.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'Spirited Away'

24 November 2014 5:36 AM, PST

★★★★★There is a scene part of the way through Hayao Miyazaki's exceptional Spirited Away (2001) in which the young girl, Chihiro (voiced by Rumi Hiiragi) helps to bathe an odorous spirit that frequents the bathhouse in which she is forced to work. Her tenacity in serving a customer that everyone else has shunned is rewarded when the spirit is revealed to have been a polluted river spirit in need of cleaning. The sequence echoes the entire film's perfect blend of Miyazaki's recurrent themes in a beautifully realised world of traditional Japanese myth. This is a magical, joyous, complex and heartstring-tugging masterpiece of cinema.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'Diary of a Lost Girl'

24 November 2014 2:06 AM, PST

★★★★☆A new restoration of G.W. Pabst’s 1929 masterpiece Diary of a Lost Girl, demonstrates the luminosity of his iconic star, Louise Brooks, in what was their final of two legendary collaborations, the other being Pandora’s Box in the same year. Having left Paramount studios to work for the celebrated German director in 1928, Brooks had been back in the Us for six months when Pabst called upon her to again take the lead in his latest production. Like Lulu in Pandora’s Box, her character, Thymian Henning in Diary of a Lost Girl was one of questionable morality, occupying, throughout the film, positions in both ‘respectable’ and ‘sleazy’ society.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Mood Indigo'

24 November 2014 1:48 AM, PST

★☆☆☆☆After having his expressive wings clipped in exchange for genre formula with The Green Hornet (2011) and relinquishing his creative control to a group of Bronx school kids in his collaborative teen comedy The We and the I (2012), Michel Gondry returns to the land of the fantastical with comic drama Mood Indigo (2013). Pitting together two of contemporary French cinema’s most prominent actors – Audrey Tautou and Romain Duris, Gondry attempts to fashion a visual representation of the golden period that immediately follows falling in love, yet in abandoning rhyme or reason in his construction of such a vivid world Gondry has made something almost entirely incomprehensible.

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- CineVue UK

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17 articles



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