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15 articles


Film Review: Barry Lyndon

2 hours ago

★★★★★ Like the protagonist of his film, Stanley Kubrick's Barry Lyndon has risen from humble circumstances, but with a meticulously and glowingly remastered re-release courtesy of the BFI, it looks like the film will be more resilient in the pinnacle it has reached than its unhappy hero. Although, there will be at least one piece in a major newspaper or blog somewhere claiming to despise the film. Such is the way of the world, a weary-sounding Michael Horden might comment.

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- CineVue UK

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Venice 2016: 73rd lineup announced

28 July 2016 3:28 AM, PDT

In Rome earlier this morning, Alberto Barbera announced one of the most impressive Venice Film Festival lineups in recent years. With stiff competition from Berlin and the encroaching Toronto - which often sees Venice stripped of its North American journalists mid-week - Venice has had hard times attracting major filmmakers. Without the glitzy market of Cannes and yet an expensive price tag to premiere a film here, Venice has been going through something of an identity crisis. With a series of Oscar-winning premieres in recent years, however, the oldest film festival in the world is ready to bounce back and this year's lineup shows an exciting mix of old masters and up-and-coming talent.

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- CineVue UK

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Interview: Pixar's Andrew Stanton and Lindsey Collins

28 July 2016 1:02 AM, PDT

The good folks at Pixar have done it again. Extraordinarily, twelve years have passed since Finding Nemo won hearts and minds all over the world and long-awaited sequel Finding Dory is another sure-fire hit for the peerless production studio. Writer-director Andrew Stanton - who was part of the team to get the Toy Story train rolling, helmed the former film as well as 2008's magical robotic tale Wall-e - and producer Lindsey Collins sat down with CineVue's Matthew Anderson for a chat about Pixar's continued successes.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: Finding Dory

28 July 2016 1:02 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Taking a swim down memory lane is a tricky business when you forget things and repeat yourself every few seconds. Finding Dory is as entertaining, soul enriching and bittersweet as any Pixar production to date. Once again striking just the right balance of visual gags, crystalline clear animation, plenty of riotous hijinks both above and below water, and cracking tongue in cheek jokes for older audience members, the peerless animation studio has another success on its hands, or rather its fins. On a more serious note - and in the mould of Up and most recently Inside Out - Finding Dory continues their focus on teaching worthwhile lessons on both the limitations imposed by, and advantages to, certain physical and mental impairments.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: The Fall

28 July 2016 12:29 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Success and failure are separated by the finest of margins in all competitive sport, nowhere more so than track and field athletics. British filmmaker Daniel Gordon's enthralling, well-considered and finely-balanced sports doc The Fall takes as its centrifugal starting point an immovable fork in the road. At the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics the women's 3000m title was, to all intents and purposes, a two horse race. It would be won by either the USA's golden poster girl Mary Decker or Zola Budd, a barefoot-running young pretender of South African origin who had been granted British citizenship only weeks previously in order to compete thanks to political wrangling by the perennially unscrupulous Daily Mail.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: The Commune

27 July 2016 5:58 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆ "You lose one another in a big house." Prophetic words from the patriarch at the head of Danish director Thomas Vinterberg's The Commune. In the wake of his father's death, Erik (Ulrich Thomsen) inherits an enormous Copenhagen property and wants to cash in on the million kroner it's worth. His bored wife, Anna (a tremendously restrained Trine Dyrholm), and adolescent daughter, Freya (Martha Sofie Wallstrøm Hansen) are in need of adventure and usher in a new chapter in lives that have become humdrum by inviting a gaggle of others to make home under their expansive roof. "I need to hear other people talk," says Anna.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: Born to Be Blue

27 July 2016 5:41 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Joining other films that revel in a bygone era (Inside Llewyn Davis, On the Road et al.), Born to Be Blue is a captivating portrait of the shadowy remains of jazz musician Chet Baker. Anchored by a wistful, wincing Ethan Hawke, this film is well worth the watch. What comes through in every frame is not only loving direction from Robert Budreau but an equally loving script. There's atmosphere, music and a sharp story-within-a-story nesting doll device which helps viewers better grasp Baker. Born to Be Blue shines.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: Author: The Jt LeRoy Story

27 July 2016 5:28 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ "A created thing is never invented and it is never true; it is always and ever itself." This quote by Federico Fellini kicks off Jeff Feuerzeig's stranger-than-fiction yarn Author: The Jt LeRoy Story - and it's the perfect way to do so. Not only does it address the elusive nature of a creation, but it equally prepares the audience for a work steeped in the ambiguity, opacity and unreliable narration of the masterful Italian auteur. However, it distinctly lacks the same kind of transcendent clarity of vision, proving to be as fractured and nebulous as its subject matter - hardly surprising given that this the story is told by its protagonist.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: The Bfg

26 July 2016 5:44 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ Steven Spielberg returns to cinema screens this week with an adaptation of Roald Dahl's much-loved children's book The Bfg, and the film is an old-fashioned children's movie of sorts. Forget Pixar's mutton dressed as lamb: The Bfg eschews any nods and winks to mum and dad - except for some humour late on - and instead translates Dahl's fable to the screen with respect and invention. We begin in a twilight London's as Sophie (Ruby Barnhill), an insomniac and precocious young girl, prowls the orphanage while the other children sleep, sorting the mail and enjoying the run of the place.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: Jason Bourne

26 July 2016 12:40 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ When The Bourne Ultimatum was released in 2007, star Matt Damon felt that the story of his amnesiac-assassin protagonist had been told. "The story of this guy's search for his identity is over" he said, before stating that only a reconfiguration of the character at some future point could persuade him to return. So to 2016 and Jason Bourne, the fourth instalment in this particular hero's saga (excluding spin-off sequel The Bourne Legacy), in which things have slightly changed, but not all that much. The popular killing-machine must go on another covert and pulse-raising search for another missing piece of his psychological jigsaw.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: Ming of Harlem

25 July 2016 6:21 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆ Ming of Harlem: Twenty One Storeys in the Air could have been a stellar documentary given its subject. Alas, it's not. The film's principle voice - and limited success - lies with the eminently watchable, animal-loving Antoine Yates, who, in 2003, was arrested and charged with reckless endangerment for housing a Bengal tiger (Ming) and alligator (named Al) in his spacious twenty-first floor Harlem apartment. The presence of said predators only came to light when Ming took a fancy to, and chomped down on, his master's leg and a 911 call had to be made. It is a story that sounds almost too bizarre for fiction, let alone a factual expose.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: Zootropolis

25 July 2016 3:19 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ Zootropolis is an absolute delight from first to last. With the kind of thought-provoking depth as seen in Inside Out, albeit not quite as emotionally stirring, it is packed full of charm, a riveting adventure and a number of valuable lessons for humankind by way of the animal kingdom. It is a triumphant, big-hearted return for Disney after the colossal commercial success of Frozen. Front and centre is the intrepid, resolute and fearless rabbit, Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin). Determined from a young age to become the first of her kind to make the police force, she becomes the city's newest recruit alongside her more fearsome colleagues.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: Poor Cow

25 July 2016 3:08 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ 1967 was the year of Carry On Doctor, Quatermass and the Pit and two James Bond movies. It also saw the feature debut of acclaimed television director Kenneth Loach with Poor Cow, starring Terence Stamp, fresh from his first brush of Hollywood fame and Carol White, who had starred in the television drama Cathy Comes Home that had propelled both its star and director into the national limelight. Based on Nell Dunn's novel - Loach had used her work before in another Wednesday Play Up the Junction - Poor Cow tells the story of Joy (White), a working class young mother whose progress through life seems beset with woes.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: Play On! Shakespeare in Silent Film

25 July 2016 2:53 AM, PDT

★★★★☆ In the ten-minute intro to Play On! Shakespeare in Silent Film, we're told that between 1899 and 1927 roughly 250-300 silent films were produced based on William Shakespeare's plays. Why so many wordless productions for history's greatest man of words? Yet the value of these early silents is delivering another perspective on the plays to discover. Marking the 400th anniversary of the Bard's death, the BFI can naturally only include a certain amount of the films on one DVD, and even then they wisely don't leave viewers to guess at the films' significance by themselves.

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- CineVue UK

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Criterion Review: Dr. Strangelove

25 July 2016 12:57 AM, PDT

★★★★★ The premise of Stanley Kubrick's 1964 unassailable Cold War satire, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, is deceptively simple: Russia and the Us, deadlocked in the threat of mutually-assured- destruction, are a hair's breadth away from obliterating each other in a nuclear holocaust. What could possibly go wrong? The answer lies in the brilliantly insane Brigadier General Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) who, his mind addled with conspiracy theories of Russians (and women) stealing his precious bodily fluids, has decided unilaterally to kick off World War III by sending orders to attack Russia.

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- CineVue UK

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15 articles



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