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12 articles


Film Review: 'The Overnighters'

2 hours ago

★★★★★More American nightmare than American Dream, Jesse Moss' Sundance award-winning documentary The Overnighters (2013) looks at the crisis at the centre of the economic collapse within the post-Empire confines of contemporary America. Coming at this point through the prism of Lutheran Pastor Jay Reinke, Moss is free to portray many positives within a tirade of negatives. Williston, North Dakota is America's 21st century equivalent of gold rush-era San Francisco. The average rent in the town has spiralled to post-New York and Los Angeles levels, but work in the fracking industry is apparently easy to find and six-figure salaries are the norm amongst employees.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Ghostbusters'

6 hours ago

★★★★☆Whether young or old, the 1984 classic Ghostbusters - directed by Ivan Reitman and starring Bill Murray (seemingly confirmed for the upcoming Ghostbusters 3 on IMDb), Sigourney Weaver and Dan Aykroyd - will always be enjoyable viewing. Rereleased in cinemas across the country this Halloween weekend, countless kids of the 80s will be able to relive their childhood and enjoy Peter, Ray, Egon and Winston don their proton packs and do battle with a gaggle of ghouls across New York City. For those unfamiliar with the story (there must be someone, somewhere), three unemployed parapsychology professors decide to set up a company that offers the unique service of removing ghosts for a price.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Horns'

6 hours ago

★★★☆☆ Daniel Radcliffe takes another unexpected step in his capricious metamorphosis, transforming from iconic boy-wizard Harry Potter, to a man-turned-devil in Alexandre Aja's uneven adaptation of Joe Hill's fantasy novel Horns (2013). Falsely accused of raping and murdering his childhood sweetheart Merrin (Juno Temple), Ig (Radcliffe) is outlawed by his friends and family, sinking into a hazy slumber. After a night of particularly heavy drinking, Ig awakens to discover two horns protruding from his temples. This monstrous development throws Ig off course at first, as these peculiar appendages unwillingly expose him to the unspoken thoughts of others - from his doctor's drug addiction to his parents' hatred of him. »

- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Nightcrawler'

20 hours ago

★★★☆☆The inaugural directorial effort of The Bourne Legacy (2012) screenwriter Dan Gilroy, Nightcrawler (2014) is a nocturnal exploration of media sensationalism and the individualistic entrepreneurialism that is so often perceived as an attainable escape route from social inequality. Boasting a noteworthy performance from Jake Gyllenhaal, Gilroy's debut finds itself lost in an inescapable maze of sound and rhythm, colours and lights, as it attempts to navigate the fine line between taste and morals. The American actor stars as Lou Bloom, a driven young man desperate to carve out a professional niche for himself in today's incredibly competitive world.

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- CineVue UK

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Film Review: 'Mr. Turner'

20 hours ago

★★★★★We see a long shot of two maids - rapt in their whispers - walking down the length of an embankment. The first flickers of dawn are in the air; the promise of a new day. The camera pans to the left and we see our artist at work, magnificently silhouetted against the horizon in a quietly euphoric panorama. This glorious opening is the perfect summation of Mike Leigh's excellent J.M.W. Turner biopic Mr. Turner (2014), his first period piece since 1999's Topsy-Turvy. This perfectly controlled shot prefaces the unusually rough beauty of the picture. We're naturally stunned by its evocative depictions of the bucolic glory around us, but we're equally touched by the small detail of life's currents beating in its midst.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'God Help the Girl'

28 October 2014 10:44 AM, PDT

★★★☆☆ The filmmaking debut of Stuart Murdoch, frontman of indie pop band Belle and Sebastian, God Help the Girl (2014) is a wistful modern-day musical structured around tracks from the band’s album of the same name. Starring rising Australian actress Emily Browning, Murdoch’s film is an interesting passion project infused by the musician’s own brand of upbeat and lyrical amiability. Browning plays Eve, an aspiring singer-songwriter trapped in a psychiatric hospital where she's being treated for anorexia nervosa. After escaping the hospital, Eve absconds to Glasgow in the hope of making her dreams of becoming a musician real.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'Blacula: The Complete Collection'

28 October 2014 10:43 AM, PDT

★★☆☆☆The Blaxploitation movement was renowned for bringing its own unique cultural spin to many well-trodden genres, and the world of classic horror proved to be no exception. Now Eureka Classics have brought their considerable restorative skills to a couple of arguably lesser-known films from the era, Blacula (1972) and its sequel Scream Blacula, Scream (1973). While the film's pun-leaden titles may immediately suggest an out-and-out horror parody, what we're actually presented with are largely straight-faced reinterpretations of the myth. The first film in particular remains surprisingly thematically faithful to Stoker's original story amongst the more oblivious contemporary appendages.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'Animal Farm'

28 October 2014 10:43 AM, PDT

★★★★☆Celebrating its sixtieth anniversary, the classic animated interpretation of Animal Farm (1954) by British studio Halas and Batchelor, captures perfectly the timeless message of George Orwell's bestselling political satire. Voiced by Maurice Denham, with a sparse, minimalistic style of hand drawn animation, the film is as magical today as when it was first released. Having endured a lifetime of mistreatment at the hands of the tyrannical landowner Mr Jones, the animals of Manor Farm stage a revolution, taking the ownership and running of the farm into their own hands. It's not long however before the pigs, led by the authoritative Napoleon, begin to take over, heading a regime even harsher than before.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Gomorrah'

28 October 2014 2:23 AM, PDT

★★★★★Narrative is the base from which elemental passages are forced upon our gaze. In recent years the very idea of watching narratives unfold over 8-12 hours had been the preserve of formalist cinema and its adherents, whether that be the likes of Béla Tarr (Sátántangó (1994), 7h12m) or Lav Diaz (Evolution of a Filipino Family (2004), 10h47m). Now the norm within Television is using narrative akin to the great Victorian novels and allowing characters to grow and breath, existing outside the prism of the forced hegemony of a Western narrative that is breathing its last breath and is forced to rehash tropes of action and romantic cinema for the masses.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'I Clowns'

27 October 2014 4:25 PM, PDT

★★★☆☆"Clown acts have to be short and make people laugh in ten minutes - give it some rhythm!" These are the words of wisdom bestowed during the first interview Federico Fellini conducts in his made-for-television pseudo-documentary, I Clowns (1970). This advice is taken to heart throughout much of the film's mischievous structure as (with the exception of the film's opening and closing set pieces), the hijinks is restricted to short bursts of colourful frivolity. It's fitting, if not inevitable, that such a subject should provide an inspiration for a director whose work was perennially imbued with a carnivalesque spirit. Whilst something of a minor work for the Italian Master, I Clowns arrived at the peek of Fellini's influence.

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- CineVue UK

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Blu-ray Review: 'Youth of the Beast'

27 October 2014 4:25 PM, PDT

★★★★☆There's a great deal to admire about Seijun Suzuki’s idiosyncratic, jazz-infused gangster thriller Youth of the Beast (1963). Released shortly after the return of the director’s hallucinatory Branded to Kill (1967) to UK screens, this sui generis Yakuza caper arrives courtesy of Eureka’s excellent Masters of Cinema Collection. Even in charge of what is ostensibly straightforward genre fare Suzuki wears his disdain for the formulaic firmly on his sleeve. With Youth of the Beast he lands somewhere between Yojimbo (1961) and its alleged source, Red Harvest, yet sets the narrative alight with his distinct brand of frantic energy.

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- CineVue UK

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DVD Review: 'Godzilla'

27 October 2014 1:04 PM, PDT

★★★★☆It was sixty years ago that a gigantic and terrifying lizard first lumbered out of the Pacific Ocean and proceeded to leave its indelible footprint on cinematic history. Since Ishiro Honda's Gojira (1954), the scaly titan has been repurposed on the silver screen dozens of times - often having to battle critics as ferociously as its need to contend with gargantuan insects, oversized primates or humanity's military prowess. Now it's the turn of British director Gareth Edwards to breathe new life into a decades old conceit with Godzilla (2014). Fortunately, he nails it, crafting a fresh motion picture whilst still managing to embrace the genre's rich heritage.

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- CineVue UK

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12 articles



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