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Talking Movies, Episode 2: The Lost Weekend (1945), The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), and Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)

9 April 2014 2:32 PM, PDT

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor

For the second episode of Talking Movies, we watched three Academy Award Best Pictures from the post-war 1940s. How do these compare with the anguished noir films of the same era? How were the directors of these films themselves influenced by the war? How did cinematic technique and performance communicate important social messages? Listen to a discussion of these questions and many more in Episode 2 of Talking Movies.

~ Talking Movies is a podcast series covering classic films from the 20th century. In this episode, our guest co-host is Scott Feinberg, the lead awards analyst for The Hollywood Reporter and the founder/editor-in-chief of ScottFeinberg.com.

Listen to the podcast…

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- Mark Pinkert

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Alfred Hitchcock – The 39 Steps (1935)

8 April 2014 8:06 AM, PDT

By Mark Pinkert

Contributor

Alfred Hitchcock‘s North by Northwest (1959) is his most famous rendering of the innocent-man-on-the-run thriller, but The 39 Steps (1935) is the original, and while the former is colored, cohesive, and so in a form for longevity, the latter is more eccentric, stylized, and perhaps more oddly compelling. But The 39 Steps hasn’t survived in popular memory because it is in black-and-white and is often difficult to understand (mumbling British accents and underdeveloped sound-mixing). Modern film viewers will have seen at least Psycho (1960),Vertigo (1958), and Rear Window (1954), or some combination of the Hitchcock essentials, but only the true enthusiasts–fewer and fewer they remain–will see The 39 Steps. My suggestion is to see it, regardless.

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- Mark Pinkert

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