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Snapshots of New Footage Emerge in Latest ‘Twin Peaks’ Trailer; Watch a Video Essay on the Mystery of Laura Palmer

1 hour ago

About twenty minutes ago I stepped onto 32nd between Madison and 5th Ave for all 15 seconds, during which time I caught sight of an Mta bus bearing something I once never thought I’d see: an advertisement for new episodes of Twin Peaks. (It was this poster in a scaled-down form.) Then I return indoors and, voila, the latest teaser. As if I weren’t already excited enough, the universe is now sending a signal of some kind.

You’re only getting exterior shots herein, though fans will no doubt dig through them for clues. Why is the Palmer home being photographed so ominously? (Answers other than “this is a David Lynch production” need only apply.) Why do we return to Fire Walk with Me‘s Fat Trout Trailer Park? Who might be playing inside the roadhouse? And that’s about it, save for some notice that the cars are »

- Nick Newman

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NYC Weekend Watch: John Ford, Jean-Pierre Melville, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Coppola & More

3 hours ago

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Five of John Ford’s best pictures play in a special edition of “Welcome to Metrograph.”

Filmmaker Tanya Hamilton will present her feature Night Catches Us on Sunday.

Quad Cinema

The series “Four Play” and “Further Research” offer films by Coppola, Kubrick, Mel Brooks and more.

The Lina Wertmüller series continues.

Film Forum

A Jean-Pierre Melville series is underway. »

- Nick Newman

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New Trailer for François Ozon’s Cannes-Bound Psychosexual Thriller ‘L’amant double’

5 hours ago

After his black-and-white period romance-drama Frantz recently got a release here in the United States, the prolific François Ozon (Swimming Pool, In the House) is returning once again to Cannes Film Festival, this time in competition, with his new thriller L’amant double.

Re-teaming with his Young & Beautiful star Marine Vacth, the film follows her as Chloe, a fragile young woman, who falls in love with her psychotherapist, Paul. A few months later, they settle down together, but she discovers that her lover, played by Jérémie Rénier, has hidden some of her identity.

A new trailer has now arrived and although it’s without English subtitles, one can glean the provocative intensity on display. Check out the trailer and poster below for the film also starring Jacqueline Bisset.

L’amant double premieres in competition at Cannes Film Festivals and opens in France on May 26.

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- Jordan Raup

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First Teaser for Sundance Winner ‘Gook’ Brings a New Perspective to the L.A. Riots

5 hours ago

Winner of the Audience Award at this year’s Sundance Film Festival in the Next section where it premiered, Justin Chon‘s Gook takes an intriguing perspective when it comes to depicting Los Angeles on April 29, 1992, when the Rodney King verdict was handed out and the riots began. Specifically, it follows two Korean-American brothers who own and run a fledging shoe store. Ahead of a release this August, Samuel Goldwyn Films have now released the first teaser.

“Warts and all, Gook serves as a perfect example (and reminder) of why the Next Section at Sundance is well worth exploring and reviewing and reacting to, perhaps more than any other slate,” we said in our review. “Chon has a vision and a voice and a good story to tell, full of social relevance and fiery emotion. Something this energetic and cared for is hard to criticize all that much. It’s »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Casting JonBenet’ Offers a Troubling Mosaic of Perspectives

6 hours ago

When it comes to documentary filmmaking, the issue of perspective is often of paramount importance. A great deal of sensitivity and tact is required in telling any true story, especially one as fraught and horrifying as the unsolved murder of JonBenét Ramsey, the six-year-old pageant queen who was murdered in 1996 in Boulder, Colorado. Kitty Green opts for a peculiar and altogether unsettling approach in her new documentary Casting JonBenet, one that utilizes a wide canvas of perspectives to approach some measure of understanding. Like a great deal of worthwhile documentaries, it offers numerous suggestions without ever providing any concrete answers, and leaves the viewer to sift through the evidence, so to speak.

Said evidence is provided by various actors — mostly consisting of Boulder residents — who are ostensibly auditioning for a filmed reproduction of the murder and unsolved investigation. This ersatz movie is, as may be surmised, a mere pretense to »

- The Film Stage

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New to Streaming: ‘The Age of Shadows,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Small Crimes,’ and More

8 hours ago

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Age of Shadows (Kim Jee-woon)

Eyebrows were raised when it was announced that South Korea will submit the as-yet-unreleased espionage thriller The Age of Shadows for Oscar consideration instead of Cannes hits The Handmaiden and The Wailing. Premiering out of competition at the 73rd Venice Film Festival, writer/director Jee-woon Kim’s return to Korean-language cinema after a brief stint in Hollywood with the Schwarzenegger-starrer The Last Stand »

- The Film Stage

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The Film Stage Show Ep. 238 – Your Name.

15 hours ago

Welcome, one and all, to the newest episode of The Film Stage Show! This week, I am joined by Michael Snydel and Bill Graham. First, we discuss the death of director Jonathan Demme. Then, we talk about the anime film Your Name. by Makoto Shinkai.

Subscribe on iTunes or see below to stream download (right-click and save as…).

M4A: The Film Stage Show Ep. 238 – Your Name.

00:00 – 04:22 – Introductions

04:23 – 13:33 – Remembering Jonathan Demme

13:34 – 36:42 – Your Name. Discussion

36:43 – 1:20:07 – Your Name. Spoiler Discussion

The Film Stage is supported by Mubi, a curated online cinema streaming a selection of exceptional independent, classic, and award-winning films from around the world. Each day, Mubi hand-picks a new gem and you have one month to watch it. Try it for free at mubi.com/filmstage.

Subscribe below:

 

E-mail us or follow on Twitter and Facebook with any questions or comments. »

- Brian Roan

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Watch: Tilda Swinton Imparts an Important Message in Video for Bong Joon-ho’s ‘Okja’

16 hours ago

“Pigs deserve happy dreams, just like the rest of us.” That’s the message imparted by Lucy Mirando, aka Tilda Swinton, in a new viral video for Bong Joon-ho’s Okja. The highly-anticipated new film from the Snowpiercer director will drop on Netflix in June, featuring a cast that includes, in addition to Swinton, Ahn Seo-hyun, Jake Gyllenhaal, Giancarlo Esposito, Paul Dano, Steven Yeun, Lily Collins, Devon Bostick, Byun Hee-bong, and Shirley Henderson. Ahn Seo-hyun plays Mija, a young girl from South Korea who has devoted her life to caring for a giant animal named Okja. Unfortunately, the multi-national Mirando Corporation, lead by Swinton’s Lucy Mirando, wants to sweep in and steal Okja for their own nefarious purposes.

In this delightfully bizarre, falsely chipper viral ad, Swinton’s pink-haired Lucy Mirando describes with wide-eyed glee the various products and activities her company is engaged in, from organic harvesting and »

- The Film Stage

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Review: ‘The Circle’ is a Surface-Level, Cartoonish Examination of Technology

16 hours ago

Like an extended episode of Black Mirror but without a dark sense of humor or bleak horror, The Circle wails about how technology is affecting society with little grace or flair. The script, by director James Ponsoldt and author Dave Eggers (adapting his own 2013 novel of the same name), approaches the business of allegorical warning by displaying a parade of soundbites from any alarmist op-ed you can think of. Social media is causing us to overshare! Data collection threatens our privacy! Tech companies have too much power! These, mind you, are all completely true, but The Circle is less likely to make the viewer gravely consider than to get them briefly tut-tuting and then not think any further.

Emma Watson stars as Mae, a new hire at tech giant The Circle, which is not entirely defined so as to better stand in for literally every Silicon Valley company you can think of, »

- Daniel Schindel

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Watch a Paul Thomas Anderson-Directed Music Video for Haim’s ‘Right Now’

27 April 2017 6:27 AM, PDT

His upcoming film won’t be the only directorial work we’ll see from Paul Thomas Anderson this year. After creating three music videos for Radiohead last year, he’s back in the short-form realm with a new music for Haim‘s new single “Right Now.”

Filmed last November in North Hollywood, California, like his last two music videos, this one is all about capturing the performance. Utilizing a gorgeous single take, the beautiful, blue-tinted video finds PTA peering around the recording studio. Check it out below, along with a snap from the set, ahead of the release of their new album, Something to Tell You, on July 7.

This is where we start… live in the studio. We were so lucky to work with the amazing Paul Thomas Anderson on capturing just us. One take, live, at Valentine Studios during the recording of our second album. There’s more to come, »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Rupture’ is a Half-Cooked Body Horror Tale

27 April 2017 5:23 AM, PDT

It’s taken ten years, but Secretary director Steven Shainberg has finally followed-up Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus. The result is Rupture, a body horror-lite tale about a woman held captive as part of an experiment meant to unlock humanity’s hidden potential to evolve beyond our current state. Written by Brian Nelson (the two share story credit), its script seeks to mess with our expectations as it does its prisoner Renee (Noomi Rapace). We’re to cultivate a sense of paranoia with surveillance dominating the first act to a point where we must scratch our heads at act two’s distinct lack of it to facilitate Renee’s actions. Is this shift an unfortunate plot-hole or merely deflection to distract us? Is it hallucination or reality, trick or mistake?

These are the questions we should ask because they allow us to dig deeper into the events surrounding »

- Jared Mobarak

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Tribeca Review: ‘The Lovers’ is Well-Acted, Unaffecting Farce

27 April 2017 5:16 AM, PDT

When a film is labeled as being a marriage drama, it is usually without question that it will contain some aspect of infidelity, and while The Lovers indeed begins with this premise, it presents the rather rare situation of “re-fidelity.” Featuring superb performances from Tracy Letts and Debra Winger, writer-director Azazel Jacobs has assembled an impeccable ensemble, but his script doesn’t quite have the dramatic acumen to make his Terri follow-up much more than an amusing farce.

For many years, the relationship between Mary (Winger) and Michael (Letts) has been going through the motions, to put it kindly. Their dormant union is one where even a moment of eye contact is rare, best exemplified when Michael is in the bathroom, pretending to be brushing his teeth, but he’s actually on the phone, as his wife is doing the same in the bedroom. An evening when they are both »

- Jordan Raup

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First Images from Hong Sang-soo’s Cannes-Bound ‘Claire’s Camera’ and ‘The Day After’

27 April 2017 5:09 AM, PDT

After bringing one of the year’s best films so far to Berlinale with On the Beach at Night Alone, Hong Sang-soo is returning to Cannes with not only his second of 2017, but his third as well. Premiering as a Special Screening is a film he actually shot at the festival, Claire’s Camera, which stars Isabelle Huppert and Kim Min-hee, following a part-time high school teacher and writer. Also starring Shahira Fahmy and Jung Jin-young, one can see the first images above and below.

As for his other film, The Day After, it will be premiering in competition at the festival. Also starring Kim Min-hee, along with Kwon Hae-hyo and Kim Sae-byeok, not much is known about the project, but judging from the first still, it looks to be in black-and-white. Check out the images below and return for our reviews of both films in the coming weeks. »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Below Her Mouth’ is an Exhilarating, Erotic Tour de Force

27 April 2017 4:31 AM, PDT

Destined to be one of the year’s most provocative releases, April Mullen’s Below Her Mouth is an erotic tour de force of uninhibited filmmaking exploring the nature of intimacy, sexuality, and the female gaze led by two extraordinary performances by Erika Linder and Natalie Krill. Dallas (Linder) is a young roofer making her living in Toronto; early in the film she proves to be emotionally unavailable as she abruptly breaks up with her yuppie girlfriend Joslyn (Mayko Nguyen) and moves out into a studio apartment. While on a job in an upscale neighborhood she encounters Jasmine (Krill), a young fashion editor that’s about to be engaged to Rile (Sebastain Pigott), who by all measures seems to be a decent man, invested in their relationship even if he’s unable to offer the kind of connection and emotional support she longs for.

Out one evening on the town with a friend, »

- John Fink

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David Fincher Will Officially, Actually Direct a ‘World War Z’ Sequel as His Next Film

26 April 2017 6:00 PM, PDT

Around the release of Gone Girl, I recall someone asking David Fincher why he wanted to adapt a pulpy best-seller instead of perhaps a more original project. His response was that he wanted people to actually show up to the multiplex to see his work, hinting at the rather cold initial response to his masterpiece. One has to imagine that’s a substantial reason for how he decided on his next project as he’s pushing that notion to extreme.

After various stages of attachment, Variety is reporting that The Social Network director has actually closed a deal to direct a sequel to World War Z. Although he did do a remake with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, this would mark his first direct sequel since his infamously bungled debut, Alien 3. Paramount is moving fast on the project as well, with production aiming to begin early next year, »

- Jordan Raup

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M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Unbreakable’-and-‘Split’ Sequel ‘Glass’ Will Arrive in 2019

26 April 2017 5:46 PM, PDT

For seventeen years, fans of M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable have wished for a sequel to the moody superhero drama. Now it looks like the filmmaker is making their wish come true: Shyamalan announced today on Twitter that his next film will be Glass, a sequel to both Unbreakable and his most recent film Split. This news gives away a twist involving Split: a brief ending scene reveals it’s set in same universe as Unbreakable.

“My new film is the sequel to #Unbreakable And #Split. It was always my dream to have both films collide in this third film,” Shyamalan tweeted, confirming that Unbreakable’s Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson would both return, along with Split’s James McAvoy and Anya Taylor-Joy.

Unbreakable focused on depressed security guard David Dunn (Willis) who, after surviving a deadly train crash, realizes he’s never been sick or injured in his entire life. »

- The Film Stage

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Tribeca Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ is a Quietly Moving Character Study

26 April 2017 5:35 PM, PDT

Faith-based cinema is as diverse a genre as there is, from the extreme, often violent portraits of devotion from established directors like Martin Scorsese and Mel Gibson, to the attacks on logic in the God’s Not Dead and Left Behind pictures. Angus MacLachlan, a great storyteller of the not-too-deep south, offers a nuanced example of what this genre can bring, returning with the moving Abundant Acreage Available. The title may signal a light-hearted film, and given MacLachlan’s previous feature (the charming sex comedy Goodbye To All That) and writing credits (which include Phil Morrison’s masterpiece Junebug), you might be forgiven for having that expectation. However, MacLachlan’s latest is a departure from his previous work: a quiet, powerful portrait of two families at a crossroads, featuring the middle-aged Ledbetters — including the reformed alcoholic Jesse (Terry Kinney) and his adopted sister Tracy (Amy Ryan) — and three aging brothers (Max Gail, »

- John Fink

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Watch: Video Compilation Evokes the Power of Jonathan Demme’s Close-Ups

26 April 2017 1:09 PM, PDT

The news of Jonathan Demme‘s death, while remarkably sad, has had at least one positive effect: across the film world and on social media we’ve seen an outpouring of love for one of our most versatile and effective filmmakers, one that’s unique for commending the artist and person. Take a quick look at the films and you’ll start to understand why. His treatment of people, how he photographed actors and allowed them to express a range of emotion that’s rare in any kind of art, would overpower viewers, and not always in the most obvious ways. How many of us saw Silence of the Lambs at a young age and were particularly moved by a series of close-ups whose place and effect we’d fail to describe? How much more easily could Beloved or Philadelphia just been social-issue movies if they weren’t such direct »

- Nick Newman

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First Teaser for Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Crime Drama ‘The Third Murder’

26 April 2017 6:15 AM, PDT

“The story is about an attorney, a murderer, and the family of a victim,” director Hirokazu Kore-eda told us earlier this year, referencing his upcoming feature The Third Murder. Following his stellar drama After the Storm, the Japanese director is shifting gears to more genre-focused fare, while seemingly still retaining a human core at the center, for his next film.

While it wasn’t ready for Cannes as editing is still underway, his next feature will arrive in Japan this September and the first teaser has arrived. Starring Masaharu Fukuyama and Koji Yakusho, the film centers on a crime trial about a homicide 30 years ago in which a president of a factory was killed, but now a lawyer has doubts about his client.

Check out the trailer below, courtesy of Cine Maldito, and see the director’s 10 favorite films.

»

- Jordan Raup

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Locarno in L.A. Review: ‘Destruction Babies’ Subverts the Action Genre

26 April 2017 6:03 AM, PDT

If Sion Sono directed the “Pick a fight with a stranger” sequence from Fight Club without any fantastical flourish, it’d come out something like Destruction Babies. That one sentence might be enough to turn certain people off ever watching this film – and fair enough, since there’s a minimal chance they’d even remotely like it. Hell, even if that description intrigues you, this movie might still not be for you. It is willfully, aggressively unpleasant, a domino string of violent scenes that are deliberately anti-entertaining.

Think about the usual mechanics of cinematic fight scenes, and Destruction Babies does the opposite. The camera spectates from a cold, steady remove. There’s zero feeling of choreography, as combatants flail about messily, missing their punches and kicks as often as they hit. There are few fancy moves – men dance around one another until one of them pins the other and then proceeds to pummel him mercilessly, »

- Daniel Schindel

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