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Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller, and Dustin Hoffman are Family in Trailer for Noah Baumbach’s ‘The Meyerowitz Stories’

39 minutes ago

In a particularly adept piece of casting, Noah Baumbach has brought together Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller, and Dustin Hoffman as a family in The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). The latest film from the director of Mistress America and Frances Ha follows the family as they regroup ahead of a celebration of their father’s work as an artist. Also starring Emma Thompson and Elizabeth Marvel, Netflix has now released the full trailer following its Cannes premiere earlier this year.

Adam Sandler has acted in nearly 50 feature films, the majority of which he’s played the lead. It won’t come as any great surprise to learn that The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) is amongst the best works of his career, comfortably scaling the lower denominators to reach those sparse upper peaks,” we said in our review. “Director Noah Baumbach draws from the 51-year-old’s main talents as both »

- Jordan Raup

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Rooney Mara Experiences Romance and Hardship in U.S. Trailer for ‘The Secret Scripture’

14 hours ago

Rooney Mara may not have any new premieres this year, but a pair of films from last year’s Tiff will finally be hitting U.S. theaters. Just a week after Una arrives, The Secret Scripture, directed by Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot, In the Name of the Father), will get a release. The story follows Vanessa Redgrave as an older version of Mara’s character, reflecting on her traumatic life in Ireland through writing a diary alongside a cast including Jack Reynor, Theo James, Aidan Turner, and Eric Bana.

We said in our review, “The result falls flat and all too conventional for the talent involved. The problem lies more in Sheridan’s direction than in Mara’s acting, which is to say that she does deliver another good performance here, but everything else does her talent a major disservice. Redgrave is also a stand-out, but the film feels »

- Jordan Raup

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Todd Haynes Returns in Magical Full Trailer for ‘Wonderstruck’

14 hours ago

“To go back and look at the cinema of 1927 is to look at a period that we all too often discard as something that is naïve and that we have improved upon,” Todd Haynes recently told us. “In fact, it may be one of the most sophisticated moments in the history of film, before sound came in, at the height of the silent era. So it’s an opportunity to be humbled by what came before me, and that you find radicality in places that we think are naïve or finished or that we have superseded or that we are much too jaded and cynical to open ourselves up to, and in fact, if you look back, we will be humbled by what has come before us, and it should keep raising the stakes of what’s possible.”

The director has now returned with Wonderstruck, an adaptation of the book by Brian Selznick. »

- Jordan Raup

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U.S. Trailer for Alain Gomis’ Berlinale Winner ‘Félicité’

14 hours ago

Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at Berlinale earlier this year, after a festival tour including Tiff, Nyff, and London, Alain Gomis’ Félicité will be getting a theatrical release next month thanks to Strand Releasing. Following a woman in the Congo who sets out on a journey to save her son after an accident, the first trailer has now landed.

“A wild and adventurous fourth feature from French-African director Alain GomisFélicité find ourselves in Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, one of the world’s most dangerous places and a hard place in the best of times to make a living,” we said in our review. “Gomis, alongside cinematographer Céline Bozon, photograph the city as a wild, confused metropolis, unspooling over new-money concrete blocks, dirt tracks and a make-shift hazardous slums. It’s where Félicité, played with style and jazz by Congolese theatre actor Vero Tshanda Beya, »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: Christopher Doyle Visually Dazzles, Narratively Disappoints in ‘Hong Kong Trilogy’

15 hours ago

An often serenely meditative exploration of sociopolitical life in contemporary Hong Kong, Christopher Doyle’s Hong Kong Trilogy is a stunningly-photographed blend of documentary and fictional narrative, following real locals playing themselves. We can’t tell where real life ends and fiction begins, and ultimately, we don’t care. The film marks Doyle’s first directorial effort, crowdfunded via a Kickstarter campaign in 2014. Doyle, the self-proclaimed Keith Richards of cinematographers, is one of the most beloved and provocative DPs in the world, endowed with an exquisite eye for composition. His new film, however, meanders around for a merciful 85 minutes before fading to black, never fusing together into anything impacting, beyond a fleetingly casual interest in the characters. Other than that, we’re left with just a handful of dazzling visuals to recall, and little more.

The film is divided across three chapters. The first, titled Preschooled, follows the students of a local private school, »

- Tony Hinds

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Review: ‘Thirst Street’ is a Wryly Funny, Vivid Entry into the Stalker Genre

16 hours ago

The stalker genre gets a wryly funny indie treatment in Thirst Street, an experience of sustained worms-under-your-skin horror (with some dark laughs). Sometime after her boyfriend’s suicide, flight attendant Gina (Lindsay Burdge) apparently takes a Tarot reading way too seriously and decides that Jerome (Damien Bonnard, who also plays the boyfriend), a one-night stand during a layover in Paris, is her new soulmate. She quits her job, moves into the apartment building across the street from Jerome’s, and starts waitressing at the sleazy nightclub where he tends bar. This is not a scenario which improves for anyone as it progresses.

Writer/director Nathan Silver and co-writer C. Mason Wells aren’t content to merely wring cringes out of Gina’s increasing unhingedness. Many of the most disquieting (and funniest) bits are the small moments of weirdness and/or confusion between characters, as well as more universal details of expat blues. »

- Daniel Schindel

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Tiff Review: ‘Soldiers. Story from Ferentari’ is a Meandering Journey of Romance in Poverty

16 hours ago

Based on lead actor Adrian Schiop’s fictionalized biography, Ivana Mladenovic’s Soldiers. Story From Ferentari shows a world of poverty and futility possessing few avenues of escape for those born within. Schiop’s character Adi arrives at the Bucharest ghetto known as Ferentari to study its people’s music of choice: manele. He’s researching the sound for his PhD thesis, the recent dissolution of a relationship at the behest of his ex-girlfriend providing the room to uproot himself for the work. But while this setting provides cheap rent—thanks to sharing an apartment with young translator Vasi (Cezar Grumarescu)—it also holds the unpredictable danger of desperation. Adi finds himself surrounded by unemployed hustlers and ex-cons using fear to satiate their vices. And it risks consuming him.

The film is his meandering journey: an optimist gradually trapped within a world devoid of optimism. Adi is a soft-spoken intellectual, »

- Jared Mobarak

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Tiff Review: ‘The Wife’ Provides Glenn Close with One of Her Finest Performances

16 hours ago

Playing Joan, the wife of a newly-announced Nobel Prize-winning novelist Joseph (Jonathan Pryce) whose career she has supported while setting her own ambitions aside, Glenn Close gives one of her finest performances in Björn Runge’s latest feature. The actress is magnificent and exudes a hypnotic screen presence in the affecting drama, aptly titled The Wife.

Runge’s film opens as the couple first receive news that Joseph has won the prize. They jump up and down on the bed like giddy children as he chants “I won the Nobel Prize.” As the significance sinks in and the full implications bear down, Joan abruptly stops celebrating and leaves the room. Things don’t get any better once they arrive in Sweden in preparation for Stockholm ceremony. Joan is clearly deeply annoyed by something and we can only guess what.

As more and more troubling details gradually spill forth, we learn »

- The Film Stage

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‘Tomb Raider’ Trailer: Alicia Vikander Gets into Action as Lara Croft

17 hours ago

After winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Girl, Interrupted back in 2000, Angelina Jolie soon followed it up portraying Lara Croft in Tomb Raider. Now, Alicia Vikander is set to do the same. Following her win for The Danish Girl, the Ex Machina star will play the videogame heroine in a tentpole set for next spring and directed by Roar Uthaug (The Wave), and the first trailer has now landed.

“She has all the fierce, tough, curious, intelligent traits,” Vikander tells EW, “but we’ve stripped away all of her experience. She hasn’t gone on an adventure just yet. She thought he was a stuck up businessperson living in the modern youth culture of suburban London, but then this whole box of information. This is the beginning.”

See the trailer, featurette and poster below for the film also starring Walton Goggins, Daniel Wu, and Dominic West.

Lara Croft is »

- Jordan Raup

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Frederick Wiseman on ‘Ex Libris,’ the Democracy of Libraries, and Why His Films Would Never Work as a TV Series

19 September 2017 6:21 AM, PDT

The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, also known as the “Main Branch” of the New York Public Library, is located at 42nd Street and 5th Avenue, next to Bryant Park. Almost 150 years ago that was the setting of the Murray Hill Reservoir, which supplied drinking water for most of the city through the end of the 19th century. It’s perhaps no coincide that the Nypl’s headquarters are located there, since they have taken on the duty of supplying the city with knowledge and culture, elements which are as essential to New Yorkers as water. The iconic building is at the center of Frederick Wiseman’s Ex Libris, an enthralling documentary that chronicles the work the Nypl continues to do since its inception in 1911.

Wiseman’s enlightening, often quite moving film, explores the Nypl’s reach beyond 42nd Street, through its almost 90 branches, which provide courses, talks and, of course, »

- Jose Solís

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Kelly Reichardt on Nature, Politics, and What She’d Change About Documentary Filmmaking

19 September 2017 6:15 AM, PDT

Kelly Reichardt’s ability to capture the plight of everyday people is evident in works like Wendy and Lucy, Old Joy, and Certain Women, all of which perfectly capture the heightened feeling of isolation propelled by the modern world. Her brilliant observations on the ways in which we try to reach out to one another, and our desire to connect are at the center of a mid-career retrospective taking place at the Museum of Modern Art, where they are screening the six films she’s made since 1994. Reichardt is an American auteur in the tradition of mavericks like John Ford and John Cassavetes, who worked outside the system to make sure their visions were never compromised by studio interference.

In the two decades she’s been making films, Reichardt has also become an excellent chronicler of our times. Like the journals kept by the characters in Meek’s Cutoff, in »

- Jose Solís

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Tiff Review: ‘Marrowbone’ is a Convoluted Mystery from the Writer of ‘The Orphanage’

19 September 2017 6:12 AM, PDT

For a mystery film, Sergio G. Sánchez’s Marrowbone inspires a lot of questions, although they’re more related to what’s outside the film. Here’s a question that kept popping up in my mind: did the writer of The Orphanage – one of the more unsettling and affective horror films from this century – really make this? The family drama, ambiguously supernatural scares, and tragic undercurrent from The Orphanage are all here, but filtered through a screenplay written by someone who must have been raised by wolves. Maybe this is a different Sergio G. Sánchez making this. Maybe this impostor lied on the application form. Either way, that situation is easier to believe than almost anything in Marrowbone.

Taking place in the late 1960s, Marrowbone opens with a prologue showing siblings Jack (George MacKay), Billy (Charlie Heaton), Jane (Mia Goth), and Sam (Matthew Stagg) arrive in a Us coastal town »

- The Film Stage

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Agnès Varda and Jr Bring Joy to the World in U.S. Trailer for ‘Faces Places’

18 September 2017 7:41 PM, PDT

In a year of moral downfall in government and an overwhelming sense of despondency when looking at the dregs of humanity, leave it to Agnès Varda and Jr to bring an abundance sense of free-wheeling freedom and joy to the world. Delightful in its quaint simplicity, Faces Places captures their journey through French villages and their community building experiments with photography. Come for this jubilation and stay for a tender reflection of a life’s journey.

Following its Audience Award win at the Toronto International Film Festival, and ahead of a theatrical release next month, the first U.S. trailer for the film has now arrived. Packing just a small amount of exuberance the feature holds, it’s a perfect little tease. While our full review will arrive when it premieres at New York Film Festival, in the meantime, check out the trailer below.

89-year old Agnes Varda, one of »

- Jordan Raup

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Darren Aronofsky’s ‘mother!’ and the Insidious Effects of Explainer Culture

18 September 2017 7:07 PM, PDT

There are movies that require explanation. I would begrudge no one for Googling around to try and find out who knew what and when in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. I myself had to do some research to try and understand what was going on in Atomic Blonde. Whenever a new Marvel movie ends with a single shot that makes the rest of the crowd cheer, I have to turn to the person next to me and ask them what it meant. Without a doubt, there are films that have objective facts or truths that may escape a casual viewers ken, or even the eye of someone desperately trying to get everything straight.

That being said, the cottage industry of “explained” articles and videos has been having a rather insidious effect on film dialogue. Perhaps it started earlier than this, but it may have reached its sinister apotheosis with the release »

- Brian Roan

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Tiff Review: ‘Outside In’ is an Ex-Con Character Study Brought Down by Clichés

18 September 2017 6:39 PM, PDT

Lynn Shelton’s latest film, Outside In, offers what you might expect from a screenplay co-written by mumblecore vet Jay Duplass and the director herself. The drama follows Duplass’ Chris, who has just been released from prison after 20 years for a crime he did not commit. The struggle for an ex-con to adjust to society has been depicted countless times before, so it is no surprise to see Shelton and Duplass showing us Chris’ ineptness at adjusting with life itself. The simplest of tasks are unagreeable to him and he’s even confused by the existence of smartphones and the texting that ensues.

The reason why Chris was freed from jail is his former high school teacher Carol (the indelible Edie Falco) who made it her life’s work to have him released. The constant efforts to free Chris have, however, hampered her marriage to Tom (Charles Leggett). Carol insists »

- The Film Stage

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The Best Films at the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival

18 September 2017 5:58 AM, PDT

When a few hundred films stop by the Toronto International Film Festival, it’s certainly impossible to cover everything, but we were able to catch around 100 features — and, with that, it’s time to conclude our experience, following the festival’s own award winners. We’ve rounded up our favorite films seen during the festival, followed by a list of the complete coverage.

Stay tuned over the next months (or years) as we bring updates on films as they make their way to screens.  One can also click here for a link to all of our coverage, including news, trailers, reviews, and much more. As always, thanks for reading, and let us know what you’re most looking forward to in the comments below.

The Breadwinner (Nora Twomey)

In the Taliban-controlled Afghan city of Kabul, Nora Twomey’s debut film as sole director (she co-helmed Oscar nominee The Secret of Kells »

- The Film Stage

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Tiff Review: ‘First Reformed’ Acts as the Full Realization of Paul Schrader’s Vision

18 September 2017 5:37 AM, PDT

Paul Schrader has been open about the original intentions for his most famous work, the screenplay to Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. Writing it in the vein of Robert Bresson films like Diary of a Country Priest or Pickpocket, it was his full intention for the film to be directed in a similarly austere fashion. This writer perhaps doesn’t need to further recount what actually happened in the end result of one of the most famous American films of all-time, but nonetheless the multiple authors involved put it in a different direction.

It seems that some of Schrader’s own directorial efforts, be it American Gigolo or Light Sleeper, were certainly an attempt to complete the “Transcendental” experience to one degree or another. Yet four decades later, First Reformed — which, should be mentioned, also seems to be taking from Bergman’s Winter Light and Tarkovsky’s Sacrifice in the »

- Ethan Vestby

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Tiff Review: ‘The Disaster Artist’ is a Love Letter to Bad Cinema

18 September 2017 5:30 AM, PDT

The Room, a film produced, directed, written, and led by “entrepreneur” Tommy Wiseau, was supposed to be his grand artistic statement. What turned out instead was what many consider to one of the very worst movies of all time. In the years since 2003, however, the result was so bad that it has transcended genres to become a cult disaster comedy. The film was so fascinatingly inept that it seemed too good to be true. Were Wiseau’s intentions genuine? Did he really set out to make a good movie? The answer, we found out, was, quite certainly, yes. And that added to the allure and charm of the picture. In depicting its creation with The Disaster Artist, a love letter to bad cinema, James Franco has now created Ed Wood for the 21st century.

The Disaster Artist starts off with documentary-style montage interviews, featuring J.J. AbramsAdam Scott, and Kevin Smith, »

- The Film Stage

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Tiff Review: Wim Wenders’ ‘Submergence’ is Dead on Arrival

18 September 2017 5:21 AM, PDT

I can’t really be held accountable for believing that the combined efforts of legendary German auteur Wim Wenders, Academy Award-winner Alicia Vikander, and the fervid James McAvoy would spawn a piece of cinema teeming with heartache and intrigue, can I? Well, as their supposed romantic thriller Submergence would have it, the thought should’ve been long purged from my mind using electroconvulsive therapy. Wenders’ deep sea exploration of love and separation, doesn’t generate enough of the former for the latter to ever matter. Dabbling in topical themes like climate change and terrorism, all while attempting to execute a Bond-esque, star-crossed lovers narrative. Submergence’s commentary ultimately conveys a whole lot of nothing.

Danielle Flinders (Vikander) is a bio-mathematician prepping for a dive into the bleakest depths of the Greenland Sea to gather specimens in a submersible. James More (McAvoy), a spy about to be shipped off to Somalia on a reconnaissance mission, »

- The Film Stage

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‘Based on a True Story’ Trailer: Eva Green Weaves a Web of Deceit in Polanski-Assayas Thriller

18 September 2017 5:17 AM, PDT

“A psychological thriller directed by Roman Polanski and co-written by Polanski and Olivier Assayas – elevator pitches don’t get much more promising than that,” we said in our review of Based on a True Story from Cannes. “Sadly, the lackluster outcome proves there’s no guaranteed recipe for success.” Despite being a disappointment at the festival earlier this year, I’m still intrigued to see Eva Green star in a Polanski film, especially one scripted by Assayas.

Ahead of a release in France this December, the first trailer has now landed. We added in our review, “Based on a True Story, adapted from the prize-winning novel by Delphine de Vigan, revisits territory Polanski has mined time and again over the course of his long career. Perhaps too many times, as the film feels like the work of an author thoroughly bored with his material, a sentiment impossible not to share as a viewer. »

- Jordan Raup

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