Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 29 items   « Prev | Next »


Giveaway: Win ‘The Big Sick’ on Blu-ray

1 hour ago

Arriving on Blu-ray this week is one of the year’s most heartfelt films, Michael Showalter’s The Big Sick, starring Kumail Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan. We’ve teamed with Lionsgate Home Entertainment to give away five (5) copies. See how to enter below and all entries must be received by 11:59 Pm Est on Sunday, September 24th.

To enter, do the first three steps and then each additional one counts as another entry into the contest.

1. Like The Film Stage on Facebook

2. Follow The Film Stage on Twitter

Follow @TheFilmStage

3. Follow The Film Stage on Instagram

4. Comment in the box on Facebook with your favorite romantic comedy this century so far.

5. Retweet the following tweet:

We're giving away #TheBigSick on Blu-ray. Rt this + follow us to enter. See more ways to enter: https://t.co/zSmEnuimmg pic.twitter.com/LXpPzc7Jth

— The Film Stage »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: ‘Elizabeth Blue’ is a Dark, Yet Hopeful Study of Mental Illness

1 hour ago

It’s highly disconcerting yet unsurprising that many Baby Boomers now in their sixties and seventies still see mental illness as a weakness. Talk about the scenarios that young people of today face and they dismiss them as a generational thing, a liberalization of society wherein strength and stoicism have been replaced by laziness and excuses. Try and tell them that very viewpoint is what stigmatized psychological ailments for so long and they scoff. It’s easier for them to believe nothing was wrong in their day than to admit the silence was a product of cultural oppression. The former hails them as tough Americans who never lost themselves. The latter colors them as unwitting villains bullying those in need, a label their systemic disregard for complex truths deems slander.

This is a template used for many social issues (see racism, sexism, homophobia, et al). The disconnect bred in these »

- Jared Mobarak

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Review: ‘Sheikh Jackson’ Revolts Against Religious Duality

1 hour ago

The thing I could never wrap my head around, religious-wise, is the idea of strict right and wrong. As a Catholic it’s somewhat easy as far as sin and repentance. You’re allowed to do a lot as long as you feel remorse and guilt enough to learn your lesson. But other religions are more stringent than Ten Commandments and more vehement in how each version of its worship follows its specific edicts. There’s no better place than the Middle East to see this in action—and I don’t mean Isis versus Islam. I’m talking traditional versus modern. Both exist simultaneously in a country such as Egypt. You have the latter’s westernized clothing and attitudes alongside the former’s veil and prayer. To choose one is to forsake the other.

This revolt against duality is behind Amr Salama’s Sheikh Jackson and the young imam »

- Jared Mobarak

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Review: ‘Mademoiselle Paradis’ Captures the Cruel, Elite World of 18th Century Europe

1 hour ago

Maria Theresia von Paradis was the daughter of Empress Maria Theresa’s Court Councilor and thus a young woman of standing despite the blindness that took her eyes before the age of five. Her father Joseph Anton and mother Maria Rosalia had the means to therefore teach her the finer things such as piano — a vocation to which she found expertise. The Empress allowed her a disability pension as financial assistance to help offset the strain of raising a daughter in the eighteenth century without prospects for marriage. But the pain in her eyes grew and every doctor hired to alleviate it only made matters worse. Franz Anton Mesmer became their last hope with his laughable method of healing via an invisible, odorless, and weightless magnetic “fluid.” It worked.

Paradis (Maria-Victoria Dragus) would eventually become a touring musician and composer who may have also been an inspiration to Mozart (she »

- Jared Mobarak

Permalink | Report a problem


NYC Weekend Watch: Samuel Fuller, Czechoslovak New Wave, Warner Bros. Criminals & More

5 hours ago

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

The retrospective of Samuel Fuller’s war films continues.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

The great Czechoslovak New Wave is highlighted in a series of banned films.

Film Forum

An outstanding exhibition of Warner Bros. films, including two-for-ones, is underway, while A Matter of Life and Death and WB cartoons also screen. »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Wes Anderson Returns to Animation in First Trailer for ‘Isle of Dogs’

11 hours ago

Wes Anderson is back, and he’s bringing a whole lot of familiar faces (and newcomers) along with him. Starrring F. Murray Abraham, Bob Balaban, Bryan Cranston, Greta Gerwig, Jeff Goldblum, Akira Ito, Scarlett Johansson, Harvey Keitel, Frances McDormand, Bill Murray, Mari Natsuki, Yojiro Noda, Kunichi Nomura, Edward Norton, Yoko Ono, Koyu Rankin, Liev Schreiber, Fisher Stevens, Tilda Swinton, Akira Takayama, Courtney B. Vance, and Frank Wood, the first trailer for Isle of Dogs has finally arrived.

The Japan-set tale, which marks his first return to animation since the fantastic Fantastic Mr. Fox, follows “a boy’s odyssey in search of his dog.” Inspired by the films of Akira Kurosawa, according to Anderson himself, the film is set to get a release in March of next year via Fox Searchlight. By the time this debuts, it’ll be the longest break between features for the director, and it’s good to have him back. »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


The Mythic Power of ‘The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford’

15 hours ago

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

“I can’t figure it out. Do want to be like me or do you want to be me?”

From the opening frames of The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Andrew Dominik stokes »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Resident Evil: Extinction’ and Paul W.S. Anderson’s Dawn of Self-Awareness

15 hours ago

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

What happens when, even ten years on, a masterpiece still has not received its due? Well, you keep pushing for it, even in the face of a macrostructure of art evaluation that will have to collapse entirely »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Listen to Darren Aronofsky and William Friedkin Discuss ‘mother!’ in a 30-Minute Talk

23 hours ago

While we’d begrudge you from going down the rabbit hole of explainer articles for mother!,  the chance to listen to writer-director Darren Aronofsky discuss the film with his F CinemaScore brethren William Friedkin is something not to pass up. Recently gathering at the Director’s Guild of America following a screening of his divisive biblical horror film, their full 34-minute talk is now available to listen to.

They work through a number of topics, from Aronofsky’s initial inspiration of Luis Buñuel’s The Exterminating Angel, the main allegories of climate change and biblical tales (no word on the artist metaphor), writing the original script in five days, and how Paramount gave him the money (“It came down to the number and Jennifer Lawrence.”)

Being that this was at the DGA, he also touched on more technical aspects, including three months of rehearsal with the main cast, then he »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller, and Dustin Hoffman are Family in Trailer for Noah Baumbach’s ‘The Meyerowitz Stories’

20 September 2017 7:44 PM, PDT

In a particularly adept piece of casting, Noah Baumbach has brought together Adam Sandler, Ben Stiller, and Dustin Hoffman as a family in The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). The latest film from the director of Mistress America and Frances Ha follows the family as they regroup ahead of a celebration of their father’s work as an artist. Also starring Emma Thompson and Elizabeth Marvel, Netflix has now released the full trailer following its Cannes premiere earlier this year.

Adam Sandler has acted in nearly 50 feature films, the majority of which he’s played the lead. It won’t come as any great surprise to learn that The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) is amongst the best works of his career, comfortably scaling the lower denominators to reach those sparse upper peaks,” we said in our review. “Director Noah Baumbach draws from the 51-year-old’s main talents as both »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Rooney Mara Experiences Romance and Hardship in U.S. Trailer for ‘The Secret Scripture’

20 September 2017 6:18 AM, PDT

Rooney Mara may not have any new premieres this year, but a pair of films from last year’s Tiff will finally be hitting U.S. theaters. Just a week after Una arrives, The Secret Scripture, directed by Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot, In the Name of the Father), will get a release. The story follows Vanessa Redgrave as an older version of Mara’s character, reflecting on her traumatic life in Ireland through writing a diary alongside a cast including Jack Reynor, Theo James, Aidan Turner, and Eric Bana.

We said in our review, “The result falls flat and all too conventional for the talent involved. The problem lies more in Sheridan’s direction than in Mara’s acting, which is to say that she does deliver another good performance here, but everything else does her talent a major disservice. Redgrave is also a stand-out, but the film feels »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Todd Haynes Returns in Magical Full Trailer for ‘Wonderstruck’

20 September 2017 6:15 AM, PDT

“To go back and look at the cinema of 1927 is to look at a period that we all too often discard as something that is naïve and that we have improved upon,” Todd Haynes recently told us. “In fact, it may be one of the most sophisticated moments in the history of film, before sound came in, at the height of the silent era. So it’s an opportunity to be humbled by what came before me, and that you find radicality in places that we think are naïve or finished or that we have superseded or that we are much too jaded and cynical to open ourselves up to, and in fact, if you look back, we will be humbled by what has come before us, and it should keep raising the stakes of what’s possible.”

The director has now returned with Wonderstruck, an adaptation of the book by Brian Selznick. »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


U.S. Trailer for Alain Gomis’ Berlinale Winner ‘Félicité’

20 September 2017 5:31 AM, PDT

Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at Berlinale earlier this year, after a festival tour including Tiff, Nyff, and London, Alain Gomis’ Félicité will be getting a theatrical release next month thanks to Strand Releasing. Following a woman in the Congo who sets out on a journey to save her son after an accident, the first trailer has now landed.

“A wild and adventurous fourth feature from French-African director Alain GomisFélicité find ourselves in Kinshasa, capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, one of the world’s most dangerous places and a hard place in the best of times to make a living,” we said in our review. “Gomis, alongside cinematographer Céline Bozon, photograph the city as a wild, confused metropolis, unspooling over new-money concrete blocks, dirt tracks and a make-shift hazardous slums. It’s where Félicité, played with style and jazz by Congolese theatre actor Vero Tshanda Beya, »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: Christopher Doyle Visually Dazzles, Narratively Disappoints in ‘Hong Kong Trilogy’

20 September 2017 4:28 AM, PDT

An often serenely meditative exploration of sociopolitical life in contemporary Hong Kong, Christopher Doyle’s Hong Kong Trilogy is a stunningly-photographed blend of documentary and fictional narrative, following real locals playing themselves. We can’t tell where real life ends and fiction begins, and ultimately, we don’t care. The film marks Doyle’s first directorial effort, crowdfunded via a Kickstarter campaign in 2014. Doyle, the self-proclaimed Keith Richards of cinematographers, is one of the most beloved and provocative DPs in the world, endowed with an exquisite eye for composition. His new film, however, meanders around for a merciful 85 minutes before fading to black, never fusing together into anything impacting, beyond a fleetingly casual interest in the characters. Other than that, we’re left with just a handful of dazzling visuals to recall, and little more.

The film is divided across three chapters. The first, titled Preschooled, follows the students of a local private school, »

- Tony Hinds

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: ‘Thirst Street’ is a Wryly Funny, Vivid Entry into the Stalker Genre

20 September 2017 4:15 AM, PDT

The stalker genre gets a wryly funny indie treatment in Thirst Street, an experience of sustained worms-under-your-skin horror (with some dark laughs). Sometime after her boyfriend’s suicide, flight attendant Gina (Lindsay Burdge) apparently takes a Tarot reading way too seriously and decides that Jerome (Damien Bonnard, who also plays the boyfriend), a one-night stand during a layover in Paris, is her new soulmate. She quits her job, moves into the apartment building across the street from Jerome’s, and starts waitressing at the sleazy nightclub where he tends bar. This is not a scenario which improves for anyone as it progresses.

Writer/director Nathan Silver and co-writer C. Mason Wells aren’t content to merely wring cringes out of Gina’s increasing unhingedness. Many of the most disquieting (and funniest) bits are the small moments of weirdness and/or confusion between characters, as well as more universal details of expat blues. »

- Daniel Schindel

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Review: ‘Soldiers. Story from Ferentari’ is a Meandering Journey of Romance in Poverty

20 September 2017 4:07 AM, PDT

Based on lead actor Adrian Schiop’s fictionalized biography, Ivana Mladenovic’s Soldiers. Story From Ferentari shows a world of poverty and futility possessing few avenues of escape for those born within. Schiop’s character Adi arrives at the Bucharest ghetto known as Ferentari to study its people’s music of choice: manele. He’s researching the sound for his PhD thesis, the recent dissolution of a relationship at the behest of his ex-girlfriend providing the room to uproot himself for the work. But while this setting provides cheap rent—thanks to sharing an apartment with young translator Vasi (Cezar Grumarescu)—it also holds the unpredictable danger of desperation. Adi finds himself surrounded by unemployed hustlers and ex-cons using fear to satiate their vices. And it risks consuming him.

The film is his meandering journey: an optimist gradually trapped within a world devoid of optimism. Adi is a soft-spoken intellectual, »

- Jared Mobarak

Permalink | Report a problem


Tiff Review: ‘The Wife’ Provides Glenn Close with One of Her Finest Performances

20 September 2017 4:04 AM, PDT

Playing Joan, the wife of a newly-announced Nobel Prize-winning novelist Joseph (Jonathan Pryce) whose career she has supported while setting her own ambitions aside, Glenn Close gives one of her finest performances in Björn Runge’s latest feature. The actress is magnificent and exudes a hypnotic screen presence in the affecting drama, aptly titled The Wife.

Runge’s film opens as the couple first receive news that Joseph has won the prize. They jump up and down on the bed like giddy children as he chants “I won the Nobel Prize.” As the significance sinks in and the full implications bear down, Joan abruptly stops celebrating and leaves the room. Things don’t get any better once they arrive in Sweden in preparation for Stockholm ceremony. Joan is clearly deeply annoyed by something and we can only guess what.

As more and more troubling details gradually spill forth, we learn »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Tomb Raider’ Trailer: Alicia Vikander Gets into Action as Lara Croft

20 September 2017 3:22 AM, PDT

After winning a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Girl, Interrupted back in 2000, Angelina Jolie soon followed it up portraying Lara Croft in Tomb Raider. Now, Alicia Vikander is set to do the same. Following her win for The Danish Girl, the Ex Machina star will play the videogame heroine in a tentpole set for next spring and directed by Roar Uthaug (The Wave), and the first trailer has now landed.

“She has all the fierce, tough, curious, intelligent traits,” Vikander tells EW, “but we’ve stripped away all of her experience. She hasn’t gone on an adventure just yet. She thought he was a stuck up businessperson living in the modern youth culture of suburban London, but then this whole box of information. This is the beginning.”

See the trailer, featurette and poster below for the film also starring Walton Goggins, Daniel Wu, and Dominic West.

Lara Croft is »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Frederick Wiseman on ‘Ex Libris,’ the Democracy of Libraries, and Why His Films Would Never Work as a TV Series

19 September 2017 6:21 AM, PDT

The Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, also known as the “Main Branch” of the New York Public Library, is located at 42nd Street and 5th Avenue, next to Bryant Park. Almost 150 years ago that was the setting of the Murray Hill Reservoir, which supplied drinking water for most of the city through the end of the 19th century. It’s perhaps no coincide that the Nypl’s headquarters are located there, since they have taken on the duty of supplying the city with knowledge and culture, elements which are as essential to New Yorkers as water. The iconic building is at the center of Frederick Wiseman’s Ex Libris, an enthralling documentary that chronicles the work the Nypl continues to do since its inception in 1911.

Wiseman’s enlightening, often quite moving film, explores the Nypl’s reach beyond 42nd Street, through its almost 90 branches, which provide courses, talks and, of course, »

- Jose Solís

Permalink | Report a problem


Kelly Reichardt on Nature, Politics, and What She’d Change About Documentary Filmmaking

19 September 2017 6:15 AM, PDT

Kelly Reichardt’s ability to capture the plight of everyday people is evident in works like Wendy and Lucy, Old Joy, and Certain Women, all of which perfectly capture the heightened feeling of isolation propelled by the modern world. Her brilliant observations on the ways in which we try to reach out to one another, and our desire to connect are at the center of a mid-career retrospective taking place at the Museum of Modern Art, where they are screening the six films she’s made since 1994. Reichardt is an American auteur in the tradition of mavericks like John Ford and John Cassavetes, who worked outside the system to make sure their visions were never compromised by studio interference.

In the two decades she’s been making films, Reichardt has also become an excellent chronicler of our times. Like the journals kept by the characters in Meek’s Cutoff, in »

- Jose Solís

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 29 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners