Week of   « Prev | Next »

8 articles


Cannes Review: ‘The Rider’ is a Beguiling Docudrama Set in the American Plains

4 hours ago

What does a cowboy do when he can’t ride? Chloe Zhao’s absorbing South Dakota-set sophomore feature has its titular rider come to terms with such a fate, in a film that’s a beguiling mix of docudrama and fiction whose story echoes much of history of its actors’ own lives. Zhao’s combination of the visual palette of Terrence Malick, the social backbone of Kelly Reichardt, and the spontaneity of John Cassavetes creates cinema verité in the American plains.

A Lakota Sioux on the prairies of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Brady (Brady Jandreau) is a hard-as-nails cowboy whose dreams of becoming a rodeo champ are dashed by a brutal head injury. The first scene has Brady in a down-and-dirty bathroom removing staples from his forehead, under which a metal plate keeps his fractured skull in place. Still recovering, he’s forbidden from getting back on horseback, but »

- Ed Frankl

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: ‘The Florida Project’ is Aesthetically Rich, But Narratively Slight

4 hours ago

There are surely few sweeter delights in this troubling world of ours than seeing Willem Dafoe politely escort a group of storks off a motel driveway. It is, perhaps, the best of a number of striking visual flourishes in Sean Baker’s The Florida Project, an aesthetically rich but narratively slight film that sees the writer-director (along with cinematographer Alexis Zabe) switch from the saturated and much-celebrated iPhone camerawork utilized for his last film Tangerine to the crackle and unmistakable warmth of celluloid.

Indeed, it proves a perfect tool for capturing the bizarre imitation-Disney hotels in which the film plays out, but could it be too beautiful for its own good? Baker indulges just a little too much time shooting his young hyperactive actors in off-key locations and perhaps not enough on their character development or narrative arcs.

Newcomers Brooklynn Prince and Bria Vinaite play Moonee and Halley, respectively, a »

- Rory O'Connor

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: ‘The Killing of a Sacred Deer’ is Pure and Simple Sadism

6 hours ago

With the successive features Dogtooth, Alps, and The Lobster, Yorgos Lanthimos seemed to be going down the same route as Wes Anderson, i.e. become one of those auteurs who refines rather than expands on his idiosyncrasies, making largely interchangeable films on an ever grander scale but with diminishing returns. In this regard, The Killing of a Sacred Deer represents a departure, venturing into genre territory previously uncharted by the director. Although a felicitous turn in principle, the dispiriting results suggest Lanthimos might have been better off staying on his original course after all.

It’s a pity, too, because for its first hour or so, The Killing of a Sacred Deer is extremely promising. Lanthimos creates a gripping and steadily intensifying sense of foreboding in depicting the professional and domestic life of his protagonist Steven (Colin Farrel), a successful heart surgeon with a picture-perfect family: beautiful wife Anna (Nicole Kidman) and two teenage children, »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

Permalink | Report a problem


Montclair Review: ‘No Man’s Land’ Goes Beyond Headlines of the Oregon Standoff

10 hours ago

Documentaries such as David Byars’ fascinating No Man’s Land have an important function going beyond the headlines, memes, and talking points that prove to be difficult to make sense of in the moment. The film gets to the heart of the 41-day occupation of Harney County, Oregon’s Malheur Wildlife Refuge by militants led by Ammon Bundy. The son of right-wing hero Cliven Bundy, he makes a compelling argument at times and one that should be heard in front of Congress. The tactics, however, are a form of domestic terrorism. The protest is against the politics of the Bureau of Land Management (which unfortunately, and confusingly, shares an acronym with Black Lives Matter) which prohibit grazing on public lands, starving independent ranches and making American ranchers less competitive than their international competitors. They argue in favor of liberating federally protected lands in the west, giving back control to states and regional governments. »

- John Fink

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: ‘Promised Land’ Links the Death of the American Dream with Elvis Presley

11 hours ago

A title like Promised Land can be appreciated for its duality: primarily meaning a land of promise but also, in another sense, a land that was promised. We’re talking about the United States of course, or rather filmmaker Eugene Jarecki is in his latest documentary. It’s an abstract road movie, fueled on disillusionment and rock and roll, and one that attempts the quite ambitious task of sketching out a narrative line to link the rise and decline of the nation with the rise and decline of Elvis Presley. If Jarecki struggles a little with this alchemy at times it is because Promised Land is essentially three movies in one: a detailed account of the King’s career; a loose account of the last 80 years of American politics; and a musical performance film. It can be a little jarring to shift between those gears but the director has form »

- Rory O'Connor

Permalink | Report a problem


Review: ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales’ is an Overwrought, Unimaginative Adventure

12 hours ago

Dead men tell no tales, and the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise should really stop telling them too. Unfortunately, Disney’s been beating this dead horse for far too long, and the fifth entry into the franchise is no exception. As the coldly calculated Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales proves, it is time to let this series rest in peace, or at the very least, spend the rest of its doomed, immortal days sinking to the bottom of the ocean.

The film opens with fraudulent promise as the young son of forever-cursed Will Turner (Orlando Bloom) and Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley) is sinking himself to the depths of the deep blue, where he lands upon the deck of the Flying Dutchman. Once on board, Will Turner’s son Henry (Brenton Thwaites) argues with his barnacle-faced father, insisting that he knows how to break the curse that »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes Review: ‘Happy End’ is a Restrained Amalgamation of Michael Haneke’s Oeuvre

12 hours ago

Happy End is a perplexing title for a movie by Michael Haneke, a filmmaker not exactly known for his irony whose endings have ranged from the death of all the central characters via murder and/or suicide (this has happened on four occasions) to the inception of Nazism. Lest anyone should suspect the redoubtable Austrian of growing soft, before the opening credits of Happy End have even finished rolling, a twelve-year-old has already killed her hamster and poisoned her mom, all of which she records and sarcastically comments on with a Snapchat-like app.

The girl is Eve Laurent (Fantine Harduin) and after these fun exploits she moves in with her father, Thomas (Mathieu Kassovitz), who abandoned Eve and her mother several years prior and now lives with his new wife and child in the opulent Laurent manor together with the rest of the clan. The Laurents are quite the package: »

- Giovanni Marchini Camia

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Diving Bell and the Butterfly’: Julian Schnabel’s Profoundly Cinematic Exercise in Empathy

12 hours ago

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

Has there ever been a more perfect pairing of medium and story than Julian Schnabel‘s The Diving Bell and the Butterfly? Cinema, an optical art form whose audience views scenes that they are powerless to change, »

- The Film Stage

Permalink | Report a problem


8 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners